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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:02 AM   #1521
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JR East to open parent-child cafe and station afterschool daycare
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20100707.pdf

Quote:
At JR East, we are proceeding with development of “station nursery schools” that make living along the JR East rail network an attractive choice. So far, we have opened 35 locations (as of July 2010), providing our services for approx. 2,000 students (based on school capacity). In addition, through the expansion of parenting support functions, we will continue striving to become a local “parenting safety net.”

As part of the expansion of our parenting support functions, we will now open a “parent-child community cafe,” a local community space for parenting uses. Going beyond just nursery schools, we will establish a place for community exchange for parents—both mothers and fathers—and spread the joy of “gathering” together. By expanding the scope of our parenting support services, we aim to further improve the attractiveness of neighborhoods.

In addition, to meet the need for daycare outside of school and daycare for sick or recovering children—a recurring request from users of our existing station nursery schools—we will open our first “station afterschool daycare center.” By combining a comfortable and pleasant place for children with content that builds basic academic skills and fosters curiosity, we will provide a safe and secure “afterschool experience.”

We will also open new nursery schools at the new parent-child community cafe and station afterschool daycare center.

Parent-child community cafe (Kagohara Station Station Building (temporary name), opening 2011)
Based on a concept of providing a place where even parents with children can relax and comfortably spend time together, we will open a parent-child cafe centered on “food,” but providing additional services and functions for “development,” “learning,” and “life.”

In particular, with regards to “food,” we will provide tasty and safe food items, placing the environment, preparation, and ingredients as our top safety concerns.

In addition, we will also provide clean children’s restrooms, a nursing room, and diaper-changing space open for use to everyone in the neighborhood.

With our “parent-child community cafe" as one piece of parenting infrastructure in this age of declining household size, we hope to capitalize on the synergistic benefits of the program by developing the cafe together with station tenant building functions.

Station afterschool daycare (Hachiōji Station South Exit Building (temporary name), opening December 2010)
In response to requests from customers using JR East’s station nursery schools, we will open a safe and secure afterschool daycare center that has a comfortable living room space for children and security systems, similar to our nursery schools.

In addition, we are aiming for an afterschool daycare center that offers optional program that places emphasis on the development of basic academic skills such as reading and writing—which many of our customers have also requested—and a wide variety of content such as a science laboratory.

JR East is aiming to expand its parenting support facilities to a cumulative total of 60 locations by April 2018, and by actively pursuing to achieve this goal ahead of schedule, we will build connections with local neighborhoods.

Parent-child community cafe:



Hachiōji Station South Exit Building:

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:03 AM   #1522
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Last days of the Keikyū 1000 series: Part 1

While this series has been decommissioned for several weeks now, I figured I would share some photos of its last days in service. All of these are taken on the Daishi Line. As usual, all the credit goes to the original blogger.

First up is Part 1:
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

“Daily life.” The 1000 series operated all across the Keikyū network and on all types of runs, and was part of “daily life” for many Keikyū riders.





At Suzukichō Station. The Daishi Line is currently being undergrounded as part of a grade-separation project.



Temporary (?) station building.









Around 7:00 am on weekdays, this special exit opens for commuters, including workers at the adjacent Ajinomoto factory. There is a simplified card reader and station staff at hand—just in case someone comes bearing a paper ticket.





Another snapshot of “daily life.”

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:05 AM   #1523
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Dbl post

Last edited by quashlo; August 8th, 2010 at 03:05 AM.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:05 AM   #1524
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Last days of the Keikyū 1000 series: Part 2

Part 2 (2010.06.24), following the 2010.06.23 Keikyū press release that formally announced the retirement of the series.
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

Sign at the convenience store at Kawasaki Station announcing special 1000 series goods for sale.



More of the “daily life” series.





Two-handle controls are getting rarer and rarer…







At Kojima Shinden Station.















Many riders use the Daishi Line to commute to and from work in the factories and plants along the Keihin corridor.



At Higashi-Monzen Station.





Keikyū decorated this unit with a special commemorative signboard.





Back at Keikyū Kawasaki…



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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:06 AM   #1525
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Last days of the Keikyū 1000 series: Part 3

Part 3 is the following day (2010.06.25), and the final installment.
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

Interior shot.











New signs inside the train advertising the farewell run. Time flies fast—these signs went up around June 24 or so, the tickets went on sale the following day, and the farewell run was the day after.



At the Keikyū convenience store inside Higashi-Monzen Station. The station staff also do cash register duties at the store.



Classic in-station grade crossing.



More of “daily life” on the Daishi Line.



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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:06 AM   #1526
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Keikyū Line grade-separation construction updates: Part 1

Some photos of the construction work a little over a month after the switchout, taken 2010.06.25.

First is Part 1, between Heiwajima and Keikyū Kamata:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Switchout point between Heiwajima and Ōmorimachi.



Not a whole lot of change here since after the switchout. The old inbound track is now being used to temporarily store sacks of ballast.



Diving underneath the elevated viaduct, there hasn’t been much movement here, either. They don’t appear to be in a rush to remove the old inbound track. They’ve converted the grade crossing at this location to a single-track crossing only.



Approaching Umeyashiki Station, where they’ve given the same treatment to this crossing.



The south end of the station closer to Keikyū Kamata, where they’ve completely severed part of the old inbound track.



You can see they’ve completely removed the old inbound track inside the station itself, probably to allow them to construct some of the necessary facilities for the new elevated platforms.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:07 AM   #1527
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Keikyū Line grade-separation construction updates: Part 2

Next is Part 2, covering the Keikyū Airport Line:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

You can see the disused old inbound track beginning to get rusted. The overhead has also been removed, but it doesn’t appear that removing the track itself is all that critical to the construction schedule, so they may wait on that.





Approaching Kōjiya Station, where they’ve removed the old inbound track, and like on the Main Line, converted the grade crossing to a one-track crossing only.



At the ground-level platform, they’ve fenced off the area beneath the new elevated viaduct. Apparently, since there are some beams sticking out from the side of these columns, the current ground-level track is still “in the way” and they can only finish this part until after they elevate the second track.



Moving to the other end of the platform closer to Ōtorii Station. From this view, it’s easier to see that the ground-level track is likely in the way of the ultimate design. Perhaps they will relocate this track to the location of the former inbound track, freeing up space to construct the permanent columns to support the elevated station.



The switchout point. In order to construct the outbound ramp, they’ll need to remove the old inbound track, but it appears they haven’t yet started.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:08 AM   #1528
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Keikyū Line grade-separation construction updates: Part 3

Next is Part 3, covering Keikyū Kamata Station:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

On the Zōshiki end of the station, they’ve quickly removed the old inbound platforms and other station facilities to free up the space beneath the new elevated station.



Looking southwest towards Zōshiki. To speed up the grade-separation across Kanpachi-dōri, it appears they will have the outbound trains use the temporary inbound elevated track (on the right here).



Moving closer to the ramp. Inbound trains previously used this temporary elevated structure and came down the ramp to enter Keikyū Kamata Station, but it seems not too complicated to convert this into a temporary outbound track. Since it doesn’t appear that they have touched this crossing much at all, they’ll probably just redesign the existing switch and this switchout point should be good-to-go.



Continuing on the ground-level outbound track…



Temporary ground-level track. This is directly below what will be the permanent tracks, so this section is on the critical path and must be removed before they can construct the rest of the permanent structure.



In the distance ahead, half of the permanent elevated viaduct ends abruptly.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:11 AM   #1529
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Keikyū Line grade-separation construction updates: Part 4

Next and final part is Part 4, covering the Main Line between Keikyū Kamata and Rokugōdote:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

The track to the right is the temporary (former) inbound track. This is the other switchout point for when the outbound trains switch to use the former inbound track. You can see that the overhead is still in place in preparation for this.



The first grade crossing on this section, which has been given the same treatment as the others.



Passing the second crossing on this section. You can see that the overhead on the temporary inbound track has been removed starting here, so from here on out, it will be just one track until they switchout completely to the permanent elevated outbound track.



Approaching Zōshiki Station.



Between Zōshiki and Rokugōdote. Based on how much space is available, they probably won’t need to do any additional relocation of the outbound track in this section before the switchout to the elevated viaduct. They will need to remove the old inbound track near the switchout point though.



Ramping up. Not a whole lot of movement at this location. Here, the old track is already elevated in order to cross the Tama River (the blue steel truss bridge in the distance)… It’s just a matter of connecting to the new elevated structure behind us.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:13 AM   #1530
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Keikyū Line platform extension construction updates

A small update (2010.06.25) on the platform extension work at Nakakido and Sugita Stations on the Keikyū Main Line to accommodate eight-car Airport express trains:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

At Nakakido Station, the work looks completely done, including installation of the fences.



In conjunction with the platform extension work, it appears they replaced some of the platform edge and guidestrip tiles on the existing platform sections and did some resurfacing.





Moving to Sugita Station, where the platform extensions are already in use, but they have yet to finish the canopies. They’ve placed the ubiquitous white construction panels on this section for the time being.



They have some scaffolding set up behind the platform to assist in the construction of the canopy.



Like at Nakakido, the guide detection tiles appear to have been upgraded on the already existing platform sections.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:15 AM   #1531
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JR East to open new travel service center for foreign visitors at Haneda Airport International Terminal Station
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20100715.pdf

Quote:
JR East will open a new “JR East Travel Service Center” inside Tōkyō Monorail Co., Ltd.’s Haneda Airport International Terminal Station in coordination with the opening of Runway D and the new International Terminal area at Tōkyō International Airport (Haneda Airport) on October 21, 2010.

Focusing primarily on services to foreign customers visiting Japan, we will provide assistance in ensuring a pleasant journey in Japan for everyone arriving from overseas.

Store details
Name: JR East Travel Service Center
Location: Inside Tōkyō Monorail Co., Ltd.’s Haneda Airport International Terminal Station (Level 2)
Hours of operation: 11:00-18:00 (open all-year)
Languages: English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese (Note: Depending on day, we may not be able to provide service in some languages)
Operating structure: Contracted operations to JR East View Travel Service Co., Ltd.

Opening day
October 21, 2010

Service details
Voucher exchange of Japan Rail Pass
Voucher echange and sale of JR East Pass
Sale of JR train tickets
Transport information, focusing on JR

Other details
  • We will accept cash as well as various credit cards for payment.
  • We will begin distribution of the information above to customers coming from overseas starting in late September through JR East’s multilingual homepage.
  • Additional JR East Travel Service Centers are also located inside Narita Airport Station and Airport Terminal 2 Station.

Rendering:

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:17 AM   #1532
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MLIT announces comprehensive access plan in preparation for expanded Haneda Airport
http://haneda.keizai.biz/headline/606/

Quote:
On July 21, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) assembled its plans with regards to improving the convenience of ground transport access to Haneda Airport, which will be expanded to serve international flights in October.

The report summarizes the status of efforts to “improve convenience and comfort to meet the needs of passengers of international flights” and “secure transport access for airplanes departing or arriving in the late evening or early morning periods” across all transport modes. The Ministry’s Civil Aviation Bureau and Kantō District Transport Bureau have been working with transport operators, airport terminal operators, and other companies to make arrangements to this effect.

The details of the report are below.

With regards to railway and monorail access, Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū) and Tōkyō Monorail will both open new stations together with the opening of the new International Terminal on October 21, improving convenience and comfort for passengers of international flights. To deal with growing luggage size, passengers will be able to take luggage carts into the paid areas of the new stations, and information and signage will be provided in four languages (Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean). For passengers transferring between international and domestic flights, use of the railways for travel between terminals will be free. With regard to access during the late evening and early morning periods, Keikyū has increased its trains with schedule changes taking effect on May 15, and Tōkyō Monorail is considering having its first trains of the day depart earlier.

In regards to buses, all existing buses currently serving the domestic terminals will also serve the International Terminal area. The stops and directional signage will be designed to be easy-to-understand, and in order to meet the needs of airline operations in the late evening and early morning periods, the MLIT is also considering the possibility of adding new service or expanding service hours earlier in the morning and later in the evening.

In preparation for an increase in passengers using international flights, taxis will take up efforts to “provide special services for foreign visitors.” Taxi companies will coordinate to improve customer service at taxi pickup areas and provide for directions in foreign languages, and a new taxi sticker system will be introduced identifying drivers that have received lectures and other training and have achieved “an established standard for level of hospitality.” The MLIT will also conduct instruction and guidance in providing around-the-clock service 24 hours a day.

Lastly, the report also incorporates information regarding rental cars and carsharing, calling for expanding services in foreign languages to meet the needs of foreign visitors and extending the hours of operation.

The MLIT says it plans on further advancing comprehensive efforts to establish and manage airport transport access in order to meet the needs of Haneda Airport’s “vast improvement in quantity and quality of functions” as a result of its expansion and new international services.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:19 AM   #1533
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Tōkyō Monorail announces new schedule for Haneda Airport International Terminal opening
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...007290483.html

Quote:
On July 29, Tōkyō Monorail announced its new schedule to take effect starting October 21, when the new International Terminal at Haneda Airport opens for service. The travel time from Hamamatsuchō Station (Minato Ward, Tōkyō) to the new International Terminal Station connected directly to both the departure and arrival lobbies will be as little as 13 minutes. The travel time to Airport Terminal 1 and Airport Terminal 2 Stations serving domestic flights will increase by one minute above the existing schedule.

According to Tōkyō Monorail, approx. 8,500 daily passengers are expected to use the new station, and the railway will add an additional 15 daily trains on both weekdays and Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. The fastest journey from Hamamatsuchō will be on the outbound “Airport rapid” trains, arriving at Airport Terminal 1 in 17 minutes and Airport Terminal 2 in 19 minutes. Coming from the three stations at Haneda Airport bound for Hamamatsuchō, the inbound travel time takes about a minute extra compared to the outbound direction due to track design and other considerations.

In regards to railway access between central Tōkyō and Haneda, Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū) will also open an International Terminal Station underground beneath the new terminal on the same day. The travel time from Shinagawa (Minato Ward) is planned to be approx. 13 to 14 minutes, and it’s expected that the battle between the two railways to capture passengers will heat up.
They also set up a live webcam at the new station that users can take turns manipulating:
http://www.tokyo-monorail.co.jp/movie/index.html (Click the blue box at center)
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:20 AM   #1534
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Press tour of new International Terminal Station: Part 1

A press tour of the new International Terminal at Haneda Airport was held on August 2, and included were tours of the new Keikyū and Tōkyō Monorail stations. The new terminal and stations are scheduled to open on October 21.

First up is the underground station on the Keikyū Airport Line (2010.08.02).
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

A through-servicing Hokusō 7300 series train glides through the empty station. Platform 1 at the station (for Haneda Airport Station) is close to 14 m wide at its maximum—perhaps a novelty of sorts in Japan as platforms are rarely, if ever, this wide. They've also installed waist-high platform doors—a "one off" installation as none of the rest of the Keikyū network has them.



Diagram of the Keikyū Station.



The new signage looks smart... With the recently implemented station numbering scheme, this station will become KK16.
For some reason, though, they haven't translated the station name into Chinese.



Station exit for Platform 1. Just beyond the faregates lie a row of escalators and elevators to whisk passengers up to the terminal's departure lobby.



Second floor of the station. On left is the ticketing entrance to Platform 2 for Shinagawa and Yokohama. The second floor of the station will also house an information counter with "concierge" staff speaking Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean to help foreign passengers purchase tickets or plan a sightseeing program.



The ceiling of the passage down to Platform 2 features these translucent solar panels. In coordination with Ōta Ward, the station features a translucent solar panel installation that can power seven elevators while still allowing natural light in to reduce electricity load.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:22 AM   #1535
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Press tour of new International Terminal Station: Part 2

Next is the new Tōkyō Monorail station (2010.08.02).
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

A 1000 series train passing through the station on Track No. 1 bound for Shin-Seibijō Station. The new station is built on a gentle curve, but the platform door installation also features gap fillers.



Diagram of the new station, which is elevated. The check-in counters at the terminal are only one minute away from the station exit.



Station name sign. Blue seems to be the color of choice for both Keikyū and Tōkyō Monorail, but these signs appear to have less foreign translation on them than the Keikyū ones.



Looking at the station entrance from the third floor of the new Internationa Terminal. A one-minute walk down the corridor on the left leads to the terminal check-in counters.



Looking at the station entrance from the second floor of the new terminal. After passing the faregates, escalators will take passengers up to platform level, with trains for Airport Terminal 1 Station and Airport Terminal 2 Station on the left, and trains for Hamamatsuchō on the right. Similar to Keikyū, passengers will be able to use the monorail to travel between the airport terminals for free.



New JR EAST Travel Service Center to open at the station.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:25 AM   #1536
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Minato Mirai Line platform extension construction updates: Part 1

Some photo updates (2010.07.31) of the platform extension work on the Minato Mirai Line in preparation for through-servicing with the Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line to begin in 2012.

First up is Motomachi – Chūkagai Station:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Closer to the stub end of the platform, the center of the platform has been boarded up. It's generally easier to extend the platform at the opposite end, but this sealed box is about the width of a stairwell, and further down the platform is another sealed-off part of the platform about the size of an elevator. Based on this, it seems likely that they will actually extend the platform in the opposite direction, at the stub end, which will require relocation of the existing stairwell and elevator at that end.



Up one level to the B3 level at the station, there is another sealed off area, approximately directly above the stub end of Platform 1.



Looking at the yellow protective installation on the overhead catenary, it's clear this is where they will be extending the platform. Obviously, there's not enough room for two extra cars between the current stopping position and the stub end stairwell, so that will have to go.



Looking down towards the stub end of Track No. 1. There's sufficient width between the platform edge and the escalator that removing the stairwell will provide sufficient platform space after the extension.



However, moving to the opposite end of the platforms, closer to Yokohama, they've also got the yellow protection for the overhead catenary here as well, so it seems likely they will extend both ends of the platform. They will probably extend as much as they can safely at the Yokohama end, but it seems they will need at least a car's worth or so of extra platform length at the stub end.



Looking into the tunnel, we can see the giant column right at the mouth of the tunnel. They'll probably extend in this direction up to that column, with the rest of the extension coming at the stub end.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:26 AM   #1537
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Minato Mirai Line platform extension construction updates: Part 2

Next up are Nihon-Ōdōri and Minato Mirai Stations:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

East end of Nihon-Ōdōri Station, closer to Motomachi – Chūkagai:



Peering into the tunnels and the platform extension, which is shaping up nicely. It will be interesting to see just what they do with the wall originally separating the two tracks, since it is load-bearing.



The same situation for the inbound track (for Yokohama and Shibuya) side. Some thin steel elements arranged in a square here... Definitely seems like they might be trying to set up replacement supports for the tunnel ceiling, etc. that will allow them to tear down the wall.



Moving to Minato Mirai Station...
This is the east end again, closer to Motomachi – Chūkagai, where a new section of the platform has been sealed off for construction. They will only be extending this end of the platforms.



The inbound track side. We can see they are installing the precast concrete slabs that will become the platform.



Outbound track side, where we can see a bit of the small frame supporting what will be the new platform extension.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:27 AM   #1538
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Tōkyū Tōyoko Line platform extension construction updates: Part 1

More photo updates (2010.07.31) of platform extension work in preparation for through-service with the Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line, this time on the Tōyoko Line.

First up are Tsunashima, Musashi Kosugi, and Jiyūgaoka Stations:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Signage notifying station users of the platform extension work. Looking at the construction areas (highlighted in salmon orange), however, it seems they are doing more than just platform extension work.



The platforms will be extended by two car-lengths at the northeast end of the station closer to Shibuya. The unusual shape of the protective fencing is a good indication of how constrained the construction area is.



On the inbound platform (for Shibuya) side, they are working on the foundations for the new platform extension. Judging from this, it doesn't look like they will be able to squeeze out much space for the platform, and it will end up being fairly narrow.



Sections of platform here and there are cordoned off, but judging from the spacing and the fact that there is an existing canopy leading up to this point, it's possilble that they plan to extend that canopy as far down the platform as they can. Looking at the first picture showing the construction areas, it doesn't look they will be doing anything on the narrowest parts of the platform, which makes sense since they want to provide as they want to keep that space as open as possible for safety reasons.



Moving to Musashi Kosugi...
Here's the situation on the inbound island platform, where they are extending two car-lengths on the Shibuya end. Unfortunately, this end of the platform is a bridge spanning directly above the JR Nambu Line, so they are filling in these gaps in the bridge with new girders to support the platform extension, as well as support columns to support the girders.



The outbound platform gives a better view of the column work at either end of the short span. The space between tracks is quite narrow, so maybe they will install some sort of fencing or wall on the inner side for the Meguro Line, where total platform length only needs to be six car-lengths.



Moving to Jiyūgaoka...
Here, they need to move back the switch for the outbound tracks to free up space in the middle for the platform extension. There doesn't seem to be a whole lot of change at this station from the last update, so they're probably still working on the foundation and trackbed before they can shift over the track.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:28 AM   #1539
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Tōkyū Tōyoko Line platform extension construction updates: Part 2

The last part is Gakugei Daigaku, Naka-Meguro, and Daikanyama Stations:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

First up is Gakugei Daigaku.
Here, they are extending the platform at the Shibuya end. Most everything is complete for the new platform except for surface finishing. They also still have to install the canopy, which has been extended—possibly to facilitate better passenger distribution across the platforms during inclement weather, when passengers tend to group under shelter. Currently, the supports are in place, but nothing of the canopy itself. The extended section is quite narrow, so they obviously moved the supports out onto the sides of the aerial structure itself to keep as much of the platform open as possible.



Moving further back down the platform, showing the under-construction canopy extension.



Looking back at the existing canopy sections, they used column supports both on the platform and on the outside of the track. For the new extension, however, they don't seem to be installing the supports outside of the track except at the very end where it gets extremely narrow.



Moving to Naka-Meguro Station, the junction between the Tōyoko Line and Tōkyō Metro Hibiya Line.
Before they can really get started on the platform extension work, they are first doing seismic reinforcement of the station structure. The construction area is shown in pink here.



Down on the concourse level of the station, they have sectioned off this part to carry out seismic reinforcement. If you look closely, you can see the faregates at the far left of the picture, facing straight into this area. A less-than-ideal solution, but necessary to get the structure seismically sound. Looking through the clear panels at the corners of this section, you can see scaffolding right up agains the walls of the box, so it's clear they're using every little bit of space they can. Apparently, they were also lots of staff on hand to direct passengers and make sure things run smoothly.



Not much movement on the platforms themselves, but there is a sectioned-off area on the outbound platform. Given that it's right next to an existing stairwell, it seems unlikely to be an escalator or elevator, but perhaps maybe a temporary administrative space during construction.



At the Yokohama end of the station, where they are probably trying to fix up this section of the aerial struture for some reason. They already have the protective fencing set up. At the Shibuya end, they had a similar story, but parts of the existing sound walls had already been removed, with only protective fencing in its place.



Last up is Daikanyama Station.
Immediately east of Daikanyama is the approach down to the new tunnels being constructed for the Tōyoko Line to allow through-servicing with the Fukutoshin Line. As a result, they need to do some complex and time-consuming work involving realignment and grade correction of several car-lengths of track at the Shibuya end of the station. As a result, they are currently moving the track onto temporary steel frame supports underground, shown here.



Existing ballast track at right and temporarily-supported track on the left.



The Shibuya end of the platform is "Construction Central" at the station.



From the Shibuya end, looking down the platform. The station is tightly hemmed in on all sides and located in an area with hilly terrain, so there is a decent-sized network of these elevated pedestrian bridges to get passengers in and out of the station.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:30 AM   #1540
quashlo
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Tōkyū to open new tenant building at Musashi Koyama Station in September
http://www.tokyu.co.jp/contents_inde...ws/100726.html

Quote:
On Friday, September 17, 2010, Tōkyū Corporation will open a new retail facility atop Musashi Koyama Station on the Meguro Line.

This retail facility was constructed on former rail right-of-way freed up by the undergrounding of the Fudōmae Station – Senzoku Station section of the Meguro Line in 2006, and is directly connected to the station concourse on Basement Level 1.

On the roof of the new facility we will construct a garden featuring trees and greenery that will allow visitors to experience the changing of the seasons, and provide an intimate space that will be used as a playground by young children and a rest stop open to all locals in the neighborhood. The main tenants of the new facility will be Tōkyū Store and Atrio Due Musashi Koyama, a recreational facility operated by Tōkyū Sports System. In addition, ten tenants will also enter the retail facility, including restaurants and goods retailers that will offer “pleasure” and “new discoveries” to customers.

The area around Musashi Koyama Station is seeing an influx in households consisting of single residents and parents with children, thanks to mutual through-servicing of the Meguro Line with the Namboku Line and Mita Line. This retail facility places station users and housewives of family households as its main target demographic, assisting in making the return commute home, the time out shopping with the children, or other facets of daily life a more pleasant, more convenient, and more healthy experience. We hope the local neighborhood will grow to love this station tenant building.

The facility and tenant store details are below.

Musashi Koyama Station Building
  • Opening: Friday, September 17, 2010 (Note: Third-floor tenant Atrio Due Musashi Koyama will open Friday, October 1)
  • Location: 3-4-8 Koyama, Shinagawa Ward, Tōkyō (atop Musashi Koyama Station on the Tōkyū Meguro Line)
  • Building structure: Steel and steel-reinforced concrete structure, four stories aboveground + one story belowground (Basement Level 1 is station facilities, Level 4 is the rooftop garden and machine room)
  • Lot size: 4,256.68 sq m
  • Gross floor area: 6,004.60 sq m (store area only, omitting station structure, vehicular parking, and bicycle parking)
  • Tenants: 12

Tenants
  • Level 3
    • Atrio Due Musashi Koyama (fitness club)
  • Level 2
    • Tōkyū Store (supermarket)
  • Level 1
    • Tully’s Coffee (specialty coffee shop)
    • Mujirushi Ryōhin (fashion, lifestyle accessories, food product sales)
    • Bleu Bleuet (fashion accessories, lifestyle accessories sales)
    • Donq (bakery)
    • Mikuniya Zengorō (Japanese tea, black tea, Chinese tea sales)
    • Au Fin Palet (Western confectionary focusing on fruit tarts)
    • Omusubi Gonbei (omusubi specialty shop)
  • Basement Level 1
    • Juicer Bar (fresh juice)
    • Culture Agent (books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, video game software, and stationery sales)
    • LAWSON + toks (convenience store)

Last edited by quashlo; August 8th, 2010 at 07:24 AM.
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