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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:31 AM   #1541
quashlo
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Tōkyū to open final phase of Tama Plaza Terrace on October 7
http://www.tokyu.co.jp/contents_inde...ws/100707.html

Quote:
At Tōkyū Corporation, we will open the new Tama Plaza Terrace Gate Plaza (Phase 3) open-air retail facility featuring 49 specialty stores on October 7, 2010 as the final phase of our redevelopment plan for the area around Tama Plaza Station on the Den’en Toshi Line. With the opening of this facility, the Tama Plaza Station Area Redevelopment Project which broke ground in November 2005 will be complete, and Tama Plaza Terrace (139 stores total) will make its grand opening.

Tama Plaza Terrace is constructed atop an artificial deck built above the train station, and is a facility serving both transport and commercial functions. Building height was kept to two to three stories above the ticketing hall, designed to be harmonious with the open streetscape that is a defining characteristic of the Tama Plaza neighborhood.

Gate Plaza (Phase 3) is an open-air mall where all stores have an outdoor entrance, and is designed to be a space that allows visitors to experience the changing seasons and gives them reasons to stay. In addition, by undergrounding the bus rotary and vehicle parking garage, cars and pedestrians are segregated, allowing for safe and comfortable excursion through the area surrounding the station. The details of Gate Plaza (Phase 3) are summarized below:
  • Based on a design concept of a “lifestyle community center,” the retail facility attracts stores with services designed towards children in order to meet the needs of families and parents in their 20s and 30s—the target demographic of the Tama Plaza Station Area Redevelopment Project.
  • Together with cable provider its communications, Inc. serving neighborhoods along the Tōkyū network, we have established the Plaza Hall by iTSCOM community hall and the iTSCOM Tama Plaza satellite studio, strengthening communication functions with residents through media.
  • We have constructed the Festival Court, a lawn and fountain square with the capacity to host concerts and events, at the center of the Tama Plaza Terrace, and constructed the adjacent Terrace Kitchen food court with an open and airy design.
  • In order to meet the demands of residents and support a diversity of lifestyles, we will secure gourmet foods stores, lifestyle goods stores, fashion shops, cafes, and restaurants with a high degree of specialization.
The Tama Plaza Station Area Redevelopment Project represents the compilation of the Tōkyū Tama Den’en Toshi (Tōkyū Tama Garden City), in which Tōkyū Corporation has been working to build neighborhoods and communities over the course of over half a century. We at Tōkyū Corporation will continue to advance attractive urban planning at the neighborhood focal points along our rail network, working to build the prestige of our trackside communities.



Terrace Kitchen



Festival Court



Open-air mall

Pictures of station and construction (2010.07.29):
Source: http://pooh0819.cocolog-nifty.com/

Station:







Under construction:





Some kind of rooftop garden, I think:

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:34 AM   #1542
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Designs for new underground Odakyū Line stations finalized
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...902000049.html

Quote:
Odakyū Electric Railway has finalized the station building designs to be constructed at Shimo-Kitazawa, Setagaya Daita, and Higashi-Kitazawa Stations (all located in Setagaya Ward, Tōkyō) as part of the undergrounding of the Odakyū Line. The undergrounding project includes both a continuous grade separation project to eliminate grade crossings that rarely open and a quadruple-tracking project aimed at increasing capacity.

In autumn of last year, the railway published design proposals for the three stations. The local Setagaya Ward government canvassed public opinion from residents along the line and modified parts of the proposals based on approx. 600 of the public comments received. The majority of comments were in regards to exterior design such as the glass roof (approx. 150 comments); passenger convenience, such as by increasing the number of faregates (approx. 140 comments); universal design (approx. 70 comments); and, environmental measures such as solar power generation and greening (approx. 30 comments).

Shimo-Kitazawa Station will feature a bright and modern interior space, incorporating natural light through via a roof that uses wire glass, which has a proven safety record after the Great Hanshin Earthquake. After receiving comments to design “open and unconfined” interior spaces, the walls proposed on either side of the entrance were removed, and the design now feels more airy and easier to navigate. Another ticketing entrance is also now planned at the Odawara end of the station.

The new Setagaya Daita Station is designed with a gentle and modest feel to harmonize with the quiet residential neighborhoods surrounding it, while the new Higashi-Kitazawa Station will feature a simple but modern design fit for a neighborhood that is a breeding ground for new culture. Comments received on both stations called for “distinctive” designs to help distinguish the two. As a result, Setagaya Daita Station will feature simple colors, while Higashi-Kitazawa Station will feature bright colors. The new designs are introduced in Shimochika Navi, an informational magazine on the undergrounding project available at the Ward Office and the three stations.

The undergrounding and three new station buildings are scheduled to be completed in FY2013.
Renderings:
Source: Setagaya Ward

Setagaya Daita Station





Higashi-Kitazawa Station





Shimo-Kitazawa Station





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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:35 AM   #1543
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Noborito Station photos

As part of the grade-separation and quadruple-tracking work going on up and down the Odakyū Line, Noborito Station was converted from two tracks, two side platforms to two tracks, one island platform, and one side platform on March 8, 2009. The design is such that it can further be expanded to a full four tracks with two island platforms.

Here’s some recent photos of the station (2010.07):
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

This is Platform 2 (outbound platform for Odawara and Katase Enoshima). The inbound island platform is Platform 3 and Platform 4, so they have actually saved Platform 1 for when they get the fourth track in operation.



An arched roof covers parts of the station.





Platform 2 departure board. They use some playful cartoons of Mt. Fuji and gondolas for Hakone-bound Romancecar limited express trains.



Romancecar Vault Super Express (VSE) 50000 series, the second newest Romancecar series after the Multi Super Express (MSE) 60000 series.



The inbound direction is already double-tracked. Congestion is worse in the morning heading to Shinjuku and central Tōkyō, so the second track in that direction was probably given priority.



The track is a “floating ladder” design that helps reduce vibration and noise. You can see Track No. 1 (the second outbound track) ends abruptly here.



Approximately the same location as above, but on October 26, 2008. They basically expanded the existing elevated structure outwards on both the west and east sides for the new tracks. Beneath and slightly ahead of us is the Tama River (the closest building is actually on the opposite bank).



The north end of Platform 2. To the left is the unused Platform 1, protected by a barrier.



Approximately the same shot as above, from October 26, 2008. They’ve since removed the gray section of the platform, which now holds the Track No. 2.





Space reserved for Track No. 1.



The south end of Platform 2, closer to Mukōgaoka Yūen. This is currently only triple-tracked, but is scheduled to be quadruple-tracked up to Mukōgaoka Yūen sometime in the future.



Noborito is the transfer station with the JR Nambu Line. The two stations are connected by covered pedestrian deck and public passage.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:38 AM   #1544
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Inokashira Line + hydrangea photos

The Keiō Inokashira Line is somewhat known for the ajisai (hydrangea) flowers that bloom along the track right-of-way, making it a popular spot for railfans to take pictures. Here’s a solid set from one of the blogs I regularly visit (2010.06):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

At Higashi-Matsubara Station. When the flowers are in bloom, Keiō sets up special lighting for the flowers for use in the evening (the green poles to the left are the lighting supports).







This train is decorated with a headmark advertising the flower “illumination.”









Moving to Shin-Daita Station…





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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:39 AM   #1545
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Ekoda Station construction updates

Some pictures of the construction going on at Ekoda Station on the Seibu Ikebukuro Line (2010.06.30). They are elevating the concourse at this station, constructing a public passage over the tracks, and making the station barrier-free.
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

They’ve now constructed a steel frame spanning both directions of track and platform on the west end of the station (they already had one of the east end), probably to support a roof.



Closer to the already-elevated part of the station concourse, the steel frame above the platform switches to a flat canopy design.



The west end of the North Exit is also starting to take shape. It’s a little constrained, but they will construct a small station plaza here.



Looking down from the station concourse…



They installed two of these large fans at the South Exit temporary stairwell because the circulation inside the station was poor.



Exiting from the South Exit and walking west towards Sakuradai. The stairwell peeking in from the right is the north-south public passage.



Sign warning about transport of steel members for the station building. I swear I’ve seen that cartoon guy everywhere…



The station has been downsized from four tracks, two island platforms to a smaller, more conventional two tracks, two side platforms. A more ideal set of passing tracks for limited-stop trains was constructed at Higashi-Nagasaki Station, so downsizing this station was not a problem operationally.





One shot from the morning of 2010.07.01:

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:41 AM   #1546
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Isesaki Line marks 100th anniversary of opening of full route
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/gu...502000073.html

Quote:
On July 13, the 100th anniversary of the opening of the full length of the Tōbu Railway Isesaki Line, the Ashikaga City Tourism Association in Tochigi Prefecture donated six commemorative headmarks to the railway. Between July 15 and the end of August, the railway will place the headmarks on its Ryōmō limited express trains.

The headmarks, 90 cm in diameter, were designed by members of the Ashikaga City Tourism Association. Inside a border of red and black—the line colors for the Isesaki Line—are images of the under-construction Tōkyō Sky Tree, Mt. Akagi, and the Watarase River.

At a presentation ceremony held at Ashikaga-shi Station, Tourism Association chairman Shinzato Genji greeted the audience, calling the Isesaki Line “an irreplaceable line.” Yoshizawa Hiromichi, a director for the railway, remarked, “I hope we can work to contribute to the betterment of areas along our line.”

The Isesaki Line first opened in 1899 between Kita-Senju (Tōkyō Prefecture) and Kuki (Saitama Prefecture). After several extensions, the section between Shin-Isesaki (Isesaki City) and Isesaki (Isesaki City) opened on July 13, 1910, marking the completion of the full length of the 113.1 km route from Asakusa.
A couple pictures (2010.07):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

One of the limited expresses with the headmark stickers parked near Narihirabashi Station. Tōkyō Sky Tree is under construction in the background.





Tōbu Spacia limited express



Tōbu 10000 series

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:42 AM   #1547
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Tōbu Railway selected for publicity award for Tōkyō Sky Tree efforts
http://www.asahi.com/business/update...007280475.html

Quote:
On July 28, the Keizai Kōhō Center (Economic Publicity Center) (Chairman: Yonekura Hiromasa (Japan Business Federation (Nippon Keidanren) chairman)) awarded its Corporate Publicity Award, given to corporations that have excelled at public relations efforts, to Tōbu Railway, project lead for the Tōkyō Sky Tree broadcast tower currently under construction. The Center recognized the railway’s efforts to improve the public image of the neighborhood and areas along its rail network by accepting interviews and holding special tours.

For Employer Awards, the Center selected Daiwa Securities president Suzuki Shigeharu, Takeda Pharmaceutical president Hasegawa Yasuchika, and JX Holdings chairman Nishio Shinji and president Takahagi Mitsunori.
As sort of a PR stunt, Tōbu actually built a 1/25th scale replica of the Tōkyō Sky Tree at Tōbu World Square, a theme park owned by the railway that features 1/25th scale replicas of famous buildings and architecture from around the world. The park is located out in Nikkō in Tochigi, so the stunt is obviously designed to get people to do daytrips or full-on vacations out to Nikkō, which is famous for natural beauty, ancient Japanese architecture, and hot springs. The replica debuted in late April and cost a handsome ¥2 million to complete.


Source: tokyoskytreemovie on YouTube

Tōbu trains passing by the constuction site:


Source: shinkyuvideo on YouTube


Source: tb8000fan on YouTube
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:43 AM   #1548
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Connecting passages between Tōkyō Metro and Toei Subway at Nihonbashi, Asakusa now open earlier
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...007250206.html

Quote:
In the early morning of July 24, in an effort to improve the convenience of transfers between Tōkyō Metro and the Toei Subway at Nihonbashi (Chūō Ward) and Asakusa (Taitō Ward) Stations, the opening time for the shutters on the transfer passages connecting the two subway networks was pushed earlier. As the operating entity is different despite being at the same station, the shutter opening time isn’t early enough to make transfers among the first few trains that arrive at the station, and passengers have needed to take the long detour out onto surface streets.

At Nihonbashi Station, to transfer from the first Tōkyō Metro Tōzai Line train (originating from Tōyōchō Station, arriving at Nihonbashi Station at 5:07 am) to the 5:11 am Toei Asakusa Line train bound for Oshiage and beyond, the shortest-distance path would be to climb the stairs and exit the faregates at Basement Level 2 of the station. Since the shutter is closed, however, passengers have needed to exit from the faregates at Basement Level 3 and take a slightly longer detour. At Asakusa Station, it takes only about one minute on foot from the Toei Asakusa Line faregates to the Tōkyō Metro Ginza Line when the shutter is open, but up until now, passengers have needed to climb to the surface first and then down, a journey that takes about five to six minutes total.

Changing the shutter opening times was a proposal by the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government, the majority shareholder in Tōkyō Metro that has been advocating for a merger between Tōkyō Metro and the Toei Subway. Opening times for the shutters, which had been preventing passage between the two stations, were pushed forward about 15 minutes to around 5:00 am. At Nihonbashi Station on July 24, a Tōkyō Metro station employee opened the electric-powered shutter at 4:57 am. On male office worker (28) from Edogawa Ward who used the passage said he was happy that the transfer was “so effortless.”

Regarding the shutters, Governor Ishihara Shintarō spared no words: “It’s extremely inconvenient for passengers transferring between systems. How stupid can it get?” Last month, Vice-Governor Inose Naoki proposed improvements at a Tōkyō Metro general shareholders meeting.
Tōkyō MX news report (2010.07.22):



Looks like this is the first step towards improving transfers between the two systems, although I have to agree with Governor Ishihara and wonder why something simple like this hasn’t already been done.

Asakusa Station
Diagram of Asakusa Station with my doodles on it.
Pink platforms are Asakusa Line, orange platforms are Ginza Line. Yellow ellipse is the shutter location. Green path is shortest distance, red path is the detour when the shutter is closed.


Original source: Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:45 AM   #1549
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Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and National Government will meet for first time on Tōkyō Metro / Toei merger
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...1246006-n1.htm

Quote:
In the debate surrounding the proposed merger of Tōkyō Metro and the Toei Subway, it was revealed that on July 29 through interviews with the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) and others that the National Government and the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government will hold their first working session to discuss a merger on August 3.

In the debate surrounding the merger, Vice-Governor Inose Naoki has already proposed a merger to the National Government at the Tōkyō Metro General Shareholders’ Meeting in June. MLIT minister Maehara Seiji remarked on July 6 that the “MLIT would be more than happy to participate,” ordering his administrative officials to draft a plan in preparation for the discussion.

The National Government owns 53.4 percent of the shares in Tōkyō Metro, while the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government owns 46.6 percent of the shares. Tōkyō Metro was established in 2004 when the Eidan Subway was dissolved in accordance with the Act on Tōkyō Metro Co., Ltd. In order to convert the company to a fully-privatized entity, the same law has required the sale of shares owned by the National Government and Tōkyō Metropolitan Government as early as possible.

The Tōkyō Metropolitan Government has been lobbying for a merger with the Toei Subway before Tōkyō Metro becomes listed on the stock exchange, in order to improve user convenience. Meanwhile, the National Government has not only asked the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government to sell its shares in the company, but has also expressed some reserve about a merger, citing among other things the Toei Subway’s long-term debt, which exceeds ¥1 trillion.

Governor Ishihara Shintarō has repeatedly said that “not merging the two systems is a slap in the face to the user. If the National Government sells its shares, we will buy them. We have no intention of selling them separately.” Meanwhile, Minister Seiji has said, “There are a fair amount of merits and demerits to merging the two systems. We have to be cautious and think things through.”
Tōkyō MX news feature (2010.07.30):

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:46 AM   #1550
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First Tōkyō Metro 16000 series train delivered

Full video documentary of the transport from the Kawasaki factory in Kōbe up to Ayase Yard in Tōkyō:


Source: krfj8000 on YouTube

Snaps by the same cameraman:
Source: http://www.krfj.net/kasukabe/

Yoyogi Uehara end.





Transported by diesel locomotive to Suita.



Transport was carried out five cars at at time to Kōbe Freight Terminal, where the full 10-car consist was assembled.











From Suita, the transport was handled by electric locomotive.



At Moriyama.



Between Hayakawa and Nebukawa.



Near Koshigaya Freight Terminal.



Near Ayase Yard, a 6000 series was tasked with moving the new unit into its new home.







Delivery complete.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:46 AM   #1551
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Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation becomes first to offer iPad, iPhone apps
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/trend/...0032000-n1.htm

Quote:
With the increasing public interest in railways, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government has jumped ahead of the national government and other jurisdictions across the country, and will become the first to provide exclusive apps for the iPad and iPhone produced by Apple in the United States. The news was revealed on July 28.

Outside of passenger information such as axonometric maps of train stations, in August the Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation will also begin streaming priceless photos and video content that can’t be obtained elsewhere, hoping to capture the hearts of railfans.

The Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation has already signed contracts with a content production company, and through the company, will sign a contract with Apple, Inc., aiming to open the service in mid-August. The contract will expire at the end of March 2011, but there are options to renew.

In its first content stream, the Bureau plans to share high-quality railway images of the Toden Arakawa Line (the last streetcar remaining within Tōkyō Prefecture) and super-real video taken from the driver’s seat on the Nippori – Toner Liner, as well as axonometric maps of 106 of its train stations.

And everything is free, of course. The Bureau plans to renew its video content twice a year.

Recently, the popularity of railways among the public has been increasing, and the phrases “Tecchan” and “Tetsuko” are becoming more and more common in mass media when referring to male and female railfans. “By taking the content we’ve been distributing through paper media up until now and distributing it digitally, we can definitely increase the efficiency of information provision. We hope to capture railfans and increase our users,” says the Bureau.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:47 AM   #1552
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Dbl post

Last edited by quashlo; August 8th, 2010 at 05:13 AM.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:49 AM   #1553
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Keisei Kanamachi Line: Videos

A handful of videos on the Kanamachi Line elevation. Switchout was the weekend of July 3-4.
Source:karibajct on YouTube

First, a short introductory tour of the Kanamachi Line, pre-elevation (2010.05.28):



A farewell to the through-service Kanamachi Line trains to / from Keisei Ueno (2010.07.02):



Immediately before the switchout (2010.07.04). Some shots of the construction, as well as inside the trains.



Immediately after the switchout (2010.07.05).

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:51 AM   #1554
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Keisei Kanamachi Line: Before the elevation, Part 1

Now some pictures… First, some shots from the days before the big weekend.

First up is Part 1 (2010.07.01):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

On the outbound island platform at Keisei Takasago, where the new departure boards are being tweaked in preparation for the opening of the Narita Sky Access.



The 6:12 departure from Takasago bound for Keisei Kanamachi, a four-car 3500 series train, rolls into the station from the nearby Takasago Car Yard.



The plates on the front of the door identifying the train type (local, express, etc.) are a rarity nowadays.



The new elevated viaduct overshadows this busy grade crossing just east of the station. The ridiculous size of the aerial structure belies the fact that only one line and one track is being elevated.



An array of signals on the primary outbound track. I believe the left-most one in the righthandside trio was for the Kanamachi Line, but I think they had already switched the Kanamachi Line trains to only depart from Platform 4, which may be why its already crossed out. The middle is for the Keisei Main Line and the right one for the Hokusō Line.



Signals for the secondary outbound track on opposite side of the platform.



The first through-service from Keisei Ueno is one of the three trains painted in historic Keisei liveries. This is the Aoden (“green train”) livery.



These direct-service Kanamachi Line trains to / from Keisei Ueno will be discontinued to provide scheduling slack for the new Skyliner trains.



A 3600 series Main Line train bound for Ueno, decked out in Narita Sky Access advertisements.



Apparently, they are also in the process of switching out the LED signs on 3000 series train ends to an ultra-bright design.



A 3300 series Kanamachi Line train in regular Keisei colors. The livery looks much better on white than on the metallic silver of stainless steel.



A rarity: a Kanamachi Line train bound for Oshiage. There are only two of these a day, and only one a day in the reverse direction.



Poster advertising the service changes. The Kanamachi Line not only gets its own platform, but also its own set of faregates.



Platform 4 no longer… The new Kanamachi Line platform will be Platform 5.



Outside the major grade crossing.



Again, a pretty impressive structure for only a single-track section.



Another Kanamachi Line train in historic livery—this time Akaden (“red train”)—leaves the yard and stops at the station before heading off to Kanamachi.



Apparently there were plenty of 3300 series trains out on the Kanamachi Line that day.



For trains with rollsigns, they are apparently switching out the background on the signs for train type to black.



Inside the station. Just ahead is where the new Kanamachi Line faregates will be located.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:52 AM   #1555
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Keisei Kanamachi Line: Before the elevation, Part 2

Part 2 (2010.07.02):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

The destination boards at Nippori Station. The 6:02 and 6:17 trains shown on the board bound for Keisei Kanamachi have now disappeared, as there are no longer direct-service trains from Ueno to / from the Kanamachi Line.
5:49 Local for Narita Airport
6:02 Local for Kanamachi
6:10 Local for Usui
6:14 Rapid for Narita Airport
6:17 Local for Kanamachi



Moving onto the Kanamachi Line at the second crossing after breaking off from the Main Line. This is the ramp touchdown location.



Looking north towards Shibamata Station, in the distance. They’ve lined up equipment where they can along the right-of-way in preparation for the switchout. After completion, this section of track and the ramp into Takasago Station will be single-track only.



An Oshiage-bound train approaches.





A fellow railfan from the local neighborhood. The tight curves on this section, combined with some of Keisei’s older stock in classy liveries, obviously make for some great shots.

















The grade and curves on this ramp are ridiculous…





Usually, these types of elevation projects are done to eliminate grade-crossings and the associated conflicts and safety issues… But in this case, Keisei is actually retaining one of the tracks (the closest one here), as it’s needed to gain access to and from Takasago Yard—otherwise, Kanamachi Line trains would have no way to get back to the barn. As a result, they aren’t even removing any of the grade crossings—this elevation is purely to free up capacity at Takasago Station in preparation for the Narita Sky Access.



Faded display of the project.



The new elevated structure is already complete and only awaiting the switchout.







A fellow railfan from the local neighborhood. The tight curves on this section, combined with some of Keisei’s older stock in classy liveries, obviously make for some great shots.

















The grade and curves on this ramp are ridiculous…





Usually, these types of elevation projects are done to eliminate grade-crossings and the associated conflicts and safety issues… But in this case, Keisei is actually retaining one of the tracks (the closest one here), as it’s needed to gain access to and from Takasago Yard—otherwise, Kanamachi Line trains would have no way to get back to the barn. As a result, they aren’t even removing any of the grade crossings—this elevation is purely to free up capacity at Takasago Station in preparation for the Narita Sky Access.



Faded display of the project.



The new elevated structure is already complete and only awaiting the switchout.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:55 AM   #1556
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Keisei Kanamachi Line: After the elevation, Part 1

Now some pics after the switchout:

Part 1 (2010.07.06):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

Back at Nippori Station, looking at the departure board again. The 6:02 and 6:17 departures originally bound for Kanamachi have been converted into longer Main Line runs for Chiharadai on the Keisei Chihara Line and Chiba Chūō on the Keisei Chiba Line:
5:49 Local for Narita Airport
6:02 Local for Chiharadai
6:10 Local for Usui
6:14 Rapid for Narita Airport
6:17 Local for Chiba Chūō



At Takasago, the new departure boards are now in operation, and the old ones have already been removed.



Apparently the one ground-level Kanamachi Line signal that was “x”-ed out a few days before is now back in operation. I guess they still need it for movements to / from Takasago Yard.



The platform station signs got a little less glamorous treatment with some paper or such taped on top of what was previously three prongs on the left side.



A 4-car 3300 series train leaves the barn and enters the station, bound for Ueno. Before the switch, these would have been departures from Kanamachi, but now they leave straight from the barn.



Special Kochikame-gō train, featuring posters based on the manga Kochikame. The manga takes place in Katsushika Ward’s Kameari area, which is more commonly associated with the JR Jōban Line. A good portion of Keisei’s network runs through Katsushika Ward, though.



Looking across at the new Kanamachi Line faregates on the other side. Looks like all the directional signage has been switched out as well. The green faregates here are for transferring to the Kanamachi Line. If you enter the concourse from the Kanamachi Line platform, you’ll see similar green faregates for transferring to the Main Line or Hokusō Line.



There are six faregates in this array, one of which is accessible. The shuttered opening in the wall to the right is for the new pedestrian ramp they have yet to construct from the station down to ground level. They’ve already installed the detection guidestrips, but have covered them up with a rubber mat (the thick black “strip” running left-right in the picture) for the time being.



Now up to the new Platform5 for the Kanamachi Line. A four-car train almost fills up the entire platform length, but the Kanamachi Line is a relatively minor branch of the Main Line anyways.



Although direct service to / from the Main Line was eliminated with the switchout, midday service was increased from every 20 minutes to every 15 minutes.



Another plus with the new Kanamachi Line platform is the great views. To the left is part of Takasago Yard, while the four tracks peeling off to the left are the Hokusō Line (outer tracks) and Keisei Main Line (inner tracks). Here, a six-car 3000 series train enters the station, a Takasago-departure bound for Oshiage. This replaces the former Kanamachi departures bound for Oshiage, operated as four-car trains.



Some nice views here of Kanamachi Line trains from the new platform…





Despite being a “neighborhoody” branch line, the morning rush hour is still the morning rush hour. Keisei Kanamachi has 24,700 daily entries and exits, and Shibamata adds another 10,200 daily entries and exits.



Train wrapped in ads for the Tora-san Museum, dedicated to Tora-san, the main character in the popular film series Otoko wa Tsurai yo. The main character’s main home is in Katsushika Ward.



The train is mostly empty in the opposite direction…

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:57 AM   #1557
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Keisei Kanamachi Line: After the elevation, Part 2

Part 2 (2010.07.06):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

At Shibamata, where the trains pass each other. Between here and Takasago, the line is now single-track.



Bound for Takasago. The new crossover is in the distance.





The line is short, so they only need to have two trains running at any one time. The Kanamachi Line platform is deserted, but passengers crowd onto the Takasago-bound train.











On board a crowded morning rush hour 3500 series bound for Takasago.





New single crossover.



After switching over to the single-track section.



There’s still some construction equipment lying around.



They dropped the elevation of the rail a bit here, so there’s actually quite a height difference between the two tracks. Because of the height difference, they hammered in some sheet piles in between the two tracks.



The reason is this grade crossing. The ramp up to Takasago is so close that the touchdown point is actually at the grade crossing. To keep the road as level as possible, they needed to bring this side down a bit.



One hell of an S curve and grade…



Ramping up… Parts of the ramp such as the left side look temporary, probably because of the need to finish the work over the weekend. Now, they’ll probably go back and start making everything permanent.



The central part of the aerial is completely concrete.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 01:58 AM   #1558
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Nippori Station construction updates

Some pictures related to the new Keisei Nippori Station. While the outbound track at the station was updated several months ago, with the opening of the Narita Sky Access, I think it deserves a little more attention.

First, a few photos focusing on the ongoing construction at the station (2010.07.01):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

An interesting shot that shows how they’ve incorporated much of the already existing elevated structure into the new one. This is from the southeast approach into Nippori—in the past, outbound trains dived down to access the ground-level Keisei platforms, but now they continue on the new elevated structure to the third level of the station. In the approach section between the new elevated structure and the old elevated structure, you can see they’ve retained the old aerial structure but added in additional beams and columns for support.



Down to ground level and closer to the action, the structure is a strange mix of both old and new.



A little more forward, closer to Nippori.



On the other side of the viaduct, on the south end closer to Keisei Ueno. The old outbound track is gone, and only the ballast remains.



Next, a look at the station facilities, focusing on the renovated ground-level Platform 1:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Aerial. JR Nippori is the expansive structure at bottom right spanning most of the ground-level tracks. Keisei Nippori is the long white structure to the right of it, and then the guideway snaking off to the right of the picture is the Nippori – Toneri Liner.



Keisei Nippori is the de facto central Tōkyō terminus of the Skyliner and the Keisei Main Line, as everybody transfers here. Keisei Ueno is connected to JR Ueno Station, but requires a bit of a hike compared to Nippori.



Transfer gates to the Keisei Line.



Concourse. The gated-off section to the right is the liner (Skyliner, Morning Liner, Evening Liner, etc.) platform.



Third level of the station.



Now to ground level… This is the south side closer to Keisei Ueno.



From the south side, looking north. Apparently there is a “hideaway” exit here…



They’ve spruced up the ground-level platform and it’s much wider now after fencing off the far side. Since the platform numbering is consecutive with JR, Keisei was only allotted two numbers from the beginning—Platform 1 and Platform 2. Since they now have three platforms, this ground-level platform became Platform 0.





Track is gone.



From the north side of the station, looking south. The platform is pretty bare bones as next to nobody boards from this platform, since it's only to Ueno.



Looking north.



From the JR Jōban Line platforms.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:00 AM   #1559
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Local residents dissatisfied with Hokusō Line fare reductions
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00654.htm

Quote:
Starting July 17, fares on the third-sector Hokusō Line (32 km) linking central Tōkyō and the Chiba New Town area in northwestern Chiba Prefecture will drop by five percent across the entire line with the help of a total of ¥300 million in subsidies from Chiba Prefecture and six cities along the line which provide investment funding for the line. The use of public funds to reduce railway fares is rare in Japan.

The effort is designed at resolving dissatisfaction with high fares on the Hokusō Line, but some residents along the line are disappointed, saying a five percent reduction is nothing more than “a drop in the bucket.”

Approx. 100,000 passengers use the Hokusō Line daily, but Chiba Prefecture’s Transport Planning Section says the fares are “two to three times as high as other lines in the Greater Tōkyō area.” A female office worker (47) from Inzai City who commutes to work in central Tōkyō complained, “The cost of commuter passes for myself, my husband, and our son who is going to high school are ¥500,000 for just half a year.”

The line has been notorious for its high fares since it opened in 1979, but if the New Town project that began in 1969 had made good progress, ridership might have increased and fares might have dropped. However, perhaps because of the high fares, the population growth in Chiba New Town stalled, and the projected resident population of 340,000 when the planning began is currently a mere 90,000. As a result, the fare hasn’t dropped and remains high. With ¥100 billion in debt with interest from construction expenses during the bubble years and other costs, the railway is ponying up ¥4 billion annually to pay off the principal.

In 2008, an advocacy group for local residents submitted a petition to the national government calling for fare reductions for the line, with 100,000 signatures in support. Governor Morita Kensaku, who was elected to office in spring of last year, established the Hokusō Line fare reductions as a major administration policy, and has been working with Hokusō Railway and local jurisdictions to finalize arrangements. As a result, of the ¥600 million in lost revenues as a result of the fare reductions, half—¥300 million—will be shouldered by the Prefectural Government and the six cities for five years.

The base fare will drop from ¥200 to ¥190, and the discount rate on school commuter passes will be expanded from 60 percent to 70 percent. According to the Prefectural Government, the only other example of public funds being directed towards reducing fares on rail lines is when Kōbe City and Hyōgo Prefecture funded fare reductions on the Hokushin Express Railway in Kōbe City.

And yet, some local residents say are still firmly dissatisfied, claiming that “five percent is just throwing bones.” In Shiroi City, which agreed to contributing ¥34.5 million in annual funding, the City Council vetoed the expenditure, saying, “Using public money to fill in the revenue gap is far from the drastic solution that we really need.”

The ¥300 million will be paid in late August. Since Shiroi City’s contribution will be postponed, representatives for Hokusō Railway have said that they “must consider reversing the fare reduction if the agreement reached with the Prefectural Government and the six neighboring jurisdictions will not be fulfilled,” and its possible that the fare reductions will be scrapped starting next year.

Hokusō Line
Operated by Hokusō Railway, a third-sector operator composed of Keisei Electric Railway and local jurisdictions. In addition to Funabashi, Inzai, and Shiroi Cities, which contain the Chiba New Town area, the line also passes through Matsudo, Ichikawa, and Kamagaya Cities. In 2000, the current full length of the line between Keisei Takasago and Inba Nihon Idai was completed. The tracks have now been extended to Narita Airport, and Keisei Electric Railway will operate its Narita Sky Access (Keisei Ueno – Narita Airport) service starting July 17.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:03 AM   #1560
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Narita Sky Access construction updates: Part 1

One last construction update pre-opening. Taken 2010.07.11.

First is Airport Terminal 2 Station, platform area.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Plan drawing of station facilities on the construction information boards. Orange arrows are exit routes for the Narita Sky Access, blue arrows are exit routes for the Keisei Main Line. If you look closely, you can see the intermediate faregates to check which route passengers are taking.



Keisei changed the stopping locations of the “liner” trains on July 3, moving them to the same spot as the regular-fare trains in preparation for the Narita Sky Access (the space where they used to stop will become the Narita Sky Access platforms).

As a result, they installed these new platform signs for “liner” trains. This is before the opening of the Sky Access, so they will peel off the top layer after the new line opens, when this platform will be for Cityliner trains. You can also see that this Platform 1 will become Platform 3.



They also installed stopping location signs across the bottom of the station walls.



The part of the platform where Keisei and Sky Access trains will overlap. For the time being, they’ve placed one of these temporary green fences, but when the permanent barrier gets installed, the last two cars on Keisei Main Line trains will jut into the Sky Access side. As a result they installed the electronic sign hanging from the ceiling above, probably to warn Sky Access passengers not to board the train.





They’ve closed off this one passage that used to connect both sides of the platform as there is a fairly large shift in the “dividing point” for Keisei and Sky Access trains depending on which side of the platform you’re on. The opposite side of this barrier is actually what will become the Sky Access half on the other side of the platform. But since they’ve already built this passage, perhaps they may do some platform extension in the future to make better use of it.



The dividing barrier is already installed here, just waiting for removal of the temporary fence.



Peering onto the Sky Access side…

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