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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:37 AM   #1581
quashlo
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 1

Another series of photos from another railfan.

First is a simple photo report (2010.07.18):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

The starting point of our journey is Keisei Ueno:



We are about to board Skyliner No. 7, departing at 7:32 am.



Time to board the train…





Arrival at Airport Terminal 1 Station.



Purchasing a ticket to go visit the new Narita Yukawa Station…



The new line has a bit of a premium, so going just two stations to Narita Yukawa is already ¥500 one way.



On the way over to Narita Yukawa, we make a quick stopover at Airport Terminal 2 Station to see how they’ve dealt with the overlap between Keisei Main Line and Sky Access trains.



This is the display on the overlap section, showing the train type (Access express) and destination (Haneda Airport via the Hokusō Line) when passengers may board.



Now, when a Keisei Main Line train comes into the station…
Apparently, the doors will still open—no door cut here.



However, the overhead display warns Sky Access passengers not to board.



Stopped at Shin-Nekoya to give priority to an airport-bound Skyliner.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:39 AM   #1582
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 2

Part 2 of the simple photo report (2010.07.18):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

At Narita Yukawa Station. This was taken the day after opening day, so things had cooled down a bit, but apparently there were still many railfans and families hoping to get pictures of the new train. This station is pretty much out in the boondocks, and the train schedule isn’t the best, so it will be interesting to see how things go. The original photographer says there was some activity out in the rotary from private vehicle pick-up and drop-off and a few bikes parked in the parking facility.



We’re going to take a Chiba Kōtsū (Chiba Bus Lines) bus to central Narita City. There are stops for three Chiba Bus Lines routes immediately outside the station. The former routes that traveled between the West Exit of JR Narita Station and Yukawa Yard have been extended to also serve the new station, and the frequencies are pretty decent (3-5 buses per hour per line off-peak, more frequent during the peaks) and actually much better than the train service.



Traveling from the station down Chiba Prefectural Road No. 18, where construction of the roadway and sidewalk is largely complete.



Arrival at the West Exit of Narita Station. Apparently, there were even a few standees on this podunk bus right before arriving at the last stop, mostly in and around Narita New Town but not close enough for walking. It will be interesting to see if a commuter culture will develop at Narita Yukawa Station…



At Keisei Narita Station, where we will make our way back to Airport Terminal 2 Station.



Disembarking at Airport Terminal 2 Station to take a look around… Here, an outbound Sky Access train is entering the station, passing the Main Line half of the platform. For safety reasons, they’ve placed one of those “train passing” signs on the Keisei half together with the typical announcements. Since there’s next to no one who boards here bound for Airport Terminal 1, there’s no need for departure boards or other amenities.



On the inbound platform, but this time they use the departure board like at most other stations to warn passengers of approaching trains. Here, a Narita Sky Access train is passing. Apparently, they also deadhead a lot of trains here, replacing trains at Sōgo Sandō—perhaps why the first departure is actually kaisō (“deadhead” or “not in service”).



An inbound Cityliner jutting way into the Sky Access side… The AE100 trains are actually longer than the regular commuter EMUs, so about two-and-a-half carlengths stick out—more like three, though, since the door is only on one end of the car. Unlike the commuter EMUs, though, it appears that they use door cuts here to prevent Sky Access passengers from boarding these cars.



The new AE trains also jut a bit into the Keisei Main Line side of the platform.



Trying to buy a Cityliner ticket at Airport Terminal 1 Station, but there’s a line…



So we cheat and head to the Arrivals Lobby at the airport to get them.



Also purchased the ¥1000 regular fare to get back to Ueno.



Boarding the Cityliner…



Arrival back in central Tōkyō.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:40 AM   #1583
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 3

Now, a more detailed look at the station facilities after the new line opened.
First up is Airport Terminal 1 Station (2010.07.19).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Sky Access LCD departure boards are up and running, side-by-side with Keisei Main Line departure boards:
9:09 Access limited express for Haneda Airport via the Hokusō Line
9:19 Skyliner No. 4 for Ueno via the Hokusō Line
9:49 Access limited express for Haneda Airport via the Hokusō Line
=========
8:56 Limited express for Ueno via Funabashi
9:13 Limited express for Ueno via Funabashi
9:35 Limited express for Ueno via Funabashi



Station entrance.



More orange and blue. This set of departure boards has a different treatment. Instead of being split between Sky Access vs. Keisei Main Line, its split between Skyliner and non-Skyliner, as the large orange gate a little distance ahead is for the Skyliner platforms (Platform 4 and Platform 5).



Non-Skyliner half of the departure board. Platform 1 for regular-fare Sky Access trains is grouped with the Main Line trains.



The side platform (Platform 1) is off to the left.



Making our way to Platform 1…



The original photographer hypothesizes that they may at some point add a Narita Sky Access “express” service, since the stopping pattern as shown on this LCD board seems to be based on a Hokusō Line express service, with some stops removed. Of course, who knows what will really happen in the future with Narita Sky Access service.



The fairly wide concourse for Platform 1. There are two up and two down escalators and one elevator.



The new side platform seems to be pretty wide.



The platform narrows and curves where the track needs to join the Main Line track.



Intemediate faregates for Platform 2 and Platform 3 for the Keisei Main Line.



The new directional signage for the Keisei Main Line. The temporary stickers for the old “Skyliner” have been peeled off to reveal “Cityliner”

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:42 AM   #1584
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 4

Next is Airport Terminal 2 Station (2010.07.19).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Gate for the new Sky Access platforms. Only Platform 1 is shown because Platform 2 is the outbound direction back towards Airport Terminal 1.



Down to platform level.



Coming down the escalator, it looks like this. Passengers are directed through the connecting passage on the right to Platform 1.



Elevator to Sky Access platforms.



Sky Access Platform 1. Items here and there have been changed to orange for the Sky Access, by there doesn’t appear to be any major changes since when this space was temporarily used by the old Skyliner trains.



The overlap zone. Some of the wall panels in this section have been converted to orange, stressing that this the Sky Access half of the platform, even though parts of Main Line trains will end up stopping here.



In addition to the overhead display from before, the orange wall panels have warnings on them as well.



Dividing barrier, with an emergency gate for station staff.



Sky Access platform destination boards.



Intermediate faregates for the Keisei Main Line.



Like for the Sky Access platforms, passengers must turn and use the connecting passage to reach the inbound platform.



Keisei Main Line Platform 3.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:44 AM   #1585
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 5

Next is Narita Yukawa Station (2010.07.19).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Exterior. From the outside, it looks fairly extravagant being three stories up, but the track is completely elevated through this section due to the terrain and the need to avoid the ground-level Abiko Branch Line of the JR Narita Line. Buses come right up to the station entrance via the station rotary.



Station entrance. Four faregates (two regular, two extra-wide).



Ticket vending machines and fare chart. The blue TVM is for regular tickets and commuter passes, the pink is for regular tickets only. Just looking at the fare chart, Keisei seems to have built themselves a decent-sized empire.



Station concourse. Since the platforms are two stories above, there is a mezzanine level in the middle. Vertical access to / from the mezzanine is the bare minimum only: one up escalator, one down escalator, and one elevator, and both escalators are narrow-type, one-person wide.



Mezzanine level. The elevator to the right is from the concourse level—there are two additional elevators, one to / from each of the platforms, off to the left and right in the direction of the guidance tiles.



Underneath Platform 2, the outbound platform for trains bound for Narita Airport. The station exterior uses plenty of glass, bringing in a lot of natural light and reducing the need for interior lighting.



Station layout is a typical minor station on a Shinkansen line, with turnouts for stopping trains, but straight track for passing trains. Just like the Shinkansen, the Sky Access line is standard gauge.



Platform waiting room—could be pretty useful given the train schedule (once every 40 minutes midday), although these are pretty much standard in new outdoor stations now. Thankfully, there is what looks to be an excellent vista, especially given the elevation of the station platforms above ground level.



Simple LED departure boards—three rows, with the center row for special train information.



Tunnel portal on the Inba Nihon Idai Station end.



Airport Terminal 2 Station end. A little ahead, the track becomes single-track on the approach into Narita Airport.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:45 AM   #1586
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 6

Next is Keisei Ueno Station (2010.07.19).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Near the faregates: These are new signs, not a whole lot different from before, but with an orange underline for the new Narita Sky Access. Perhaps they went with an underline instead of orange text because of readability concerns against a white background.



Inside the paid area concourse, where the second pair of LCD destination boards is in service. Before the opening, only one pair was in service, but now the second is up and running. However, instead of splitting Hokusō Line / Sky Access vs. Main Line, they have split it premium-fare (right pair) vs. regular-fare trains (left pair).



Closer look at the destination board for premium-fare trains—i.e., liner trains (Skyliner, Cityliner, Evening Liner). The stopping pattern displays on the right seem to work quite well at helping passengers distinguish which train to take. The former Skyliner on the Main Line has been converted to a new "Cityliner" service (shown here with a purple box on the screen), with additional stops at Aoto and Funabashi.



Closer look at the destination board for regular-fare trains, where they show both Main Line and Sky Access trains. At the very top of the sign, the words "Narita Airport" appear bigger on the Sky Access row than on the Main Line row, perhaps to emphasize that the Sky Access is the primary route to Narita Airport.



Directional signage. Before the opening of the Sky Access, there was a general pattern for platform usage by train type, but now, all four platforms have been marked for the Main Line and the Sky Access. There still is some pattern, however, as Cityliner trains don't stop at Platforms 1 and 2, as shown by these signs.



Platforms 3 and 4, where the Cityliner is called out.



Platforms 1 and 2. Since Sky Access and Main Line trains can stop on either island platform, the leftmost column on each platform departure board identifies which line the train will run on—"Keisei Main Line" in green text, or "Narita Sky Access" inside an orange box. Here, the departure boards show Skyliner and Main Line limited express trains side-by-side, back-to-back.



Somewhat unusual, a schedule for only Platforms 1 and 2.



LCD departure boards outside the station concourse. Here, they've been a little more frugal and opted not to go with the stopping pattern displays.



Liner ticket machine next to the staffed liner ticket counter. For whatever reason, the yellow sign asks passengers to purchase Cityliner tickets from the counter... Not really sure why. The LCD board above shows the next four liner or regular-fare limited express trains:
15:27 Limited express for Narita Airport via Funabashi
15:40 Skyliner No. 43 for Narita Airport via the Hokusō Line
15:47 Limited express for Narita Airport via Funabashi
15:50 Cityliner No. 93 for Narita via Funabashi

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:45 AM   #1587
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 7

Next is Nippori Station (2010.07.21).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

JR-Keisei transfer gates.





Five-row LED departure board that shows all outbound trains, regardless of route. For Narita Airport-bound trains, however, they provide information on the route ("via the Hokusō Line" for the Narita Sky Access and "via Funabashi" for the Keisei Main Line). This also pushes the words "Narita Airport" out to the right, making it easier to pick out train options for Airport-bound passengers.
14:41 Local for Usui
14:45 (Narita Sky Access) Skyliner No. 39 for Narita Airport via the Hokusō Line
14:49 Local for Tsudanuma
14:51 (Keisei Main Line) Limited express for Narita Airport via Funabashi
14:55 Cityliner No. 91 for Narita Airport via Funabashi



Skyliner information counter. In the background is another large LCD installation, three-wide, with the one on the far right for general announcements.



Directional signage for Platform 1, the liner-exclusive platform. The Skyliner takes the spotlight, but the Cityliner and Evening Liner also make it on there.





Directional signage for Platform 2, the regular-fare trains. Like at Ueno, they shrunk the words "Narita Airport" for the Keisei Main Line, as the Narita Sky Access now offers a more direct route.
The bottom sign informs passengers that the first car of four- and six-car trains will stop behind them. With the changes on July 17, Keisei also shifted the stopping locations for the six-car trains because of heavy platform congestion near the up escalator.



Said escalator, which cuts into the platform area.



Local for Chiba Chūō on the Keisei Chiba Line rolls into the station. There's still a bit of platform congestion here near the stairwell, but there's more queuing space here than at the escalator.



Platform LED departure boards. The lefthandside of the board for keiyu ("route") is not used during this time of the day, as regular-fare Narita Sky Access trains only come here during the mornings and evenings. At other times, they travel via the Oshiage Line to / from the Toei Subway Asakusa Line.



Door location



Sky Access departure board inside the JR concourse at the station. As mentioned before, at this time of the day, the only Sky Access trains to stop here are the Skyliners.



Keisei Main Line departure board inside the JR concourse.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:47 AM   #1588
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 9

Next is Oshiage Station (2010.07.21).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

No major changes at the faregates, but they did install new LCD boards immediately behind them, complete with stopping pattern displays.



Another set deeper into the station. Left is outbound, right is inbound onto the subway line.



The outbound platform version of the boards in the first picture:
17:55 (Narita Sky Access) Access limited express for Airport Terminal 1 via the Hokusō Line
17:59 Rapid limited express for Narita
18:01 Local for Aoto
As a little detail, you can see they've designed the lines in the stopping pattern displays to bend in different directions: upwards for Hokusō Line / Narita Sky Access trains and downwards for Keisei Main Line trains.



Inbound trains.
Here, the signage in the inbound direction is much simpler than in the outbound direction, since there are no alternative route options like in the outbound direction getting to Narita Airport, atlhough there is technically a fork at Sengakuji between the Asakusa Line and Keikyū Line. There is no need for a "route" column, resulting in an extremely easy-to-decipher board.



Down on the outbound platforms.
With limited headroom, the departure boards on the platforms are only two rows tall, but effort is still given to provide "route" information consistent with the other recently-installed boards.





Directional signage to platforms on support column. The inbound Platforms 1 and 2 have a little bit more information here than the departure board on the platform.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:47 AM   #1589
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 8

Next is Aoto Station (2010.07.21).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Typical island platform LED departure board, serving both Platform 3 and Platform 4 on the third level of the station.



Closer look at the Platform 3 side:
17:14 Local bound for Inzai Makinohara
17:15 Local bound for Usui
17:18 (Narita Sky Access) Access limited express for Airport Terminal 1 via the Hokusō Line



Directional signage to Platforms 3 and 4.



Platform schedules.



The Evening Liner waiting booth has now been converted to also serve Cityliner passengers.



Liner ticket machine. Cityliner has also been added here.
Tickets go on sale 20 minutes before departure time.



Atop the door to the booth is the Cityliner schedule. There is one early morning run, but otherwise, the Cityliner trains mostly run during midday. From Aoto, the Cityliner journey to Airport Terminal 1 is about one hour. The fare to Narita Airport (either Terminal 2 or Terminal 1) is ¥920.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:48 AM   #1590
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Narita Sky Access photo report: Part 9

Next is Oshiage Station (2010.07.21).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

No major changes at the faregates, but they did install new LCD boards immediately behind them, complete with stopping pattern displays.



Another set deeper into the station. Left is outbound, right is inbound onto the subway line.



The outbound platform version of the boards in the first picture:
17:55 (Narita Sky Access) Access limited express for Airport Terminal 1 via the Hokusō Line
17:59 Rapid limited express for Narita
18:01 Local for Aoto
As a little detail, you can see they've designed the lines in the stopping pattern displays to bend in different directions: upwards for Hokusō Line / Narita Sky Access trains and downwards for Keisei Main Line trains.



Inbound trains.
Here, the signage in the inbound direction is much simpler than in the outbound direction, since there are no alternative route options like in the outbound direction getting to Narita Airport, atlhough there is technically a fork at Sengakuji between the Asakusa Line and Keikyū Line. There is no need for a "route" column, resulting in an extremely easy-to-decipher board.



Down on the outbound platforms.
With limited headroom, the departure boards on the platforms are only two rows tall, but effort is still given to provide "route" information consistent with the other recently-installed boards.





Directional signage to platforms on support column. The inbound Platforms 1 and 2 have a little bit more information here than the departure board on the platform.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:49 AM   #1591
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Keisei Oshiage Line construction updates

Some updates on the construction work near Keisei Hikifune Station, part of the grade-separation of the line between Oshiage and Aoto (2010.07.21):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Between Yahiro and Hikifune.
The temporary inbound track, under construction on the right, pulls up alongside the temporary outbound track, partially occupying space formerly used for the old outbound track.



A little further down the line, the temporary inbound track has been shifted out quite a ways from the existing track. As a result, they're already preparing some protective fencing for when after trains switch over to the temporary track and workers will begin constructing the permanent elevated structure.



The east end of the existing inbound platform at Yahiro Station, looking at the temporary inbound platform, which is largely finished. Because there simply isn't enough space to build a ticketing entrance in between the current and the temporary tracks, they will be keeping the existing ticketing entrances for now, but will construct connecting passages to get passengers to / from the temporary platform. The gap at center here in the protective wall along the temporary platform will likely be the mouth of this new passage.



At the west end of the platform, it's the same story, with a gap in the protective wall to connect to a new passage. On the night of the switchout, they will construct the passages simultaneously overnight and trains will be operating on the temporary platform the next morning.



Informational sign about the switchout, which will occur from the late evening of Sunday, August 6 to the early morning of Saturday, August 7.



At the switchout point west of the station, looking back from the rear end of an inbound train. Here, they've laid down all the temporary rail they can and now just have to wait until the big night.



At the closest downstream grade crossing. The temporary track will branch off from the existing track at around this location.



At the overpass above the Tōbu Kameido Line, they are working on the temporary bridge and outbound track. In fact, some of the catenary supports now jut into the construction zone in preparation for the switchover. This construction won't make it for the August 7 switches, but shouldn't be too far into the future considering the progress being made.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:50 AM   #1592
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Railways join effort to capitalize on Tōkyō’s zoos
http://www.nikkei.com/life/news/arti...EBE2E2E2E2E2E2

Quote:
The Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and the Tōkyō Zoological Park Society have teamed up with Tōkyō Metro and other railways to establish a “Visit Zoo Campaign” Promotion Committee to capitalize on the various zoos in Tōkyō Prefecture as a tourism resource. The committee will reevaluate the role of zoos and aquariums as sightseeing hotspots, and coordinate with various railway companies and local jurisdictions in developing a revitalization strategy. In the three years until 2012, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government hopes to increase visitors to its zoos.

The committee will include representatives from Taitō Ward, Hino City, Edogawa Ward, and Musashino City, as well as from East Japan Railway Company (JR East), Keiō Corporation, and other participants. The committee will work towards making active use of Ueno Zoological Gardens, Tama Zoological Park, Tōkyō Sea Life Park, and the Inokashira Park Zoo.

The committee has already held its first session, debating the design of directional signage from train stations and the reception for foreign visitors. Committee members also expressed opinions on how to capitalize on the new panda scheduled to be received from China next year as a tourism resource.

The Tōkyō Metropolitan Government has established the coming three years as a period of strengthening the zoos’ ability to attract visitors, and until now has proposed increasing the number of days the zoos are open and extending open hours.
A Keiō 6000 series in the old livery running on the Keiō Dōbutsuen Line, a short shuttle line that serves Tama Zoological Park. The train is decked out with a headmark that celebrates the 10th anniversary of Keiō Rail Land, a small museum and railfan facility set up by Keiō in the zoo (2010.03.21). The train features the letters "K.T.R." representing the former name of the railway: Keiō Teito Railway (lit. Keiō Imperial Capital Railway), a holdover name from before the war that only disappeared in 1998. Also featured are some photo sessions with special headmarks: Takao, Jinba, and Geikō.


Source: azusaline on YouTube
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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:51 AM   #1593
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Tōkyū’s newest CMs

I was kind of hoping these would pop up on YouTube, but for now I’ll just post the Tōkyū website links.

Tōkyū Group CM (2010)
http://www.tokyu.co.jp/group/cm/

Three versions (two 30-second versions and a 60-second version) which you can select using the three buttons at left. Like the previous Tōkyū Group CM (see here), this one advertises family living along the Tōkyū network. Composer is Hisaishi Jō.

Tōkyū Corporation (2010)
Ano machi e, Tōkyū-sen de.
“To that place (from before), on the Tōkyū Lines.”

Looks like this will be a series of CMs… This one is for Yokohama, with shots of the Minato Mirai / waterfront area. I’m guessing they will probably have a Shibuya one in the future, although I don’t know what would come after that… Maybe Naka-Meguro or Jiyūgaoka? Futako – Tamagawa perhaps?
http://www.tokyu.co.jp/railway/cm/index.html
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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:52 AM   #1594
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Odakyū Romancecar CMs

This is a long-running series of CMs advertising Odakyū’s Romancecar limited express service to / from Hakone. The theme song for each is the same: Romance wo Mō Ichidō (“The Romance, One More Time”) by singer-songwriter Kuzuya Yōko.

2010
Minna Matomete (Summer)
“All Together”


Source: anpanmanson on YouTube

2008


Source: hinatabi on YouTube

2007


Source: hinatabi on YouTube

2002-2006
This is actually a fan compilation of all the older CMs, set to the music of the entire theme song like a music video.


Source: JRe209hashirundesu on YouTube
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Old August 8th, 2010, 02:54 AM   #1595
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More railway CMs

Tōbu Railway Spacia limited express
Tsuma no Omoi ("A Wife's Love")
feat. Nakano Tsuyoshi, Arai Sumire, and Tezuka Mai


Source: anpanmanson on YouTube

JR Kyūshū
Noru dake, Ecology ("Ecology by Riding")


Source: kahorex on YouTube

JR East
Chiba Destination Campaign
feat. Nishiyama Maki


Source: taitaiyaki on YouTube
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Old August 8th, 2010, 08:08 AM   #1596
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This is fun to see all the pictures and read about the first days of operation of the Skyliner! I just had the privilege of riding the Skyliner on August 7, 2010. I rode a limited express train from Narita airport terminal 1 to Ueno via the new sky access route departing at 0659 and returning the same day on a Skyliner train departing Ueno at 1100. It was quite an experience! They seem to be doing quite a bit of work along the sky access line close to the airport and Narita. Do you know what is in store, Quashlo?

I'm so glad I was able to ride it so close to the opening of the line. How much of the route was used before the Skyliner came to be?

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Old August 8th, 2010, 05:52 PM   #1597
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Hm, maybe the construction you saw is for National Route 464 / Kita-Chiba Dōro (North Chiba Roadway). This is a new national highway they are building parallel to the Hokusō Line / Narita Sky Access Line from Ichikawa City to Narita. On the elevated sections of the Sky Access Line, I believe there should already be some of the columns in place, and on the trench sections on both sides of Hokusō Line, I think they are doing excavation / grading work.

The Skyliner, as a reserved-seat limited express service between Tōkyō and Narita Airport, has been around for a long time, but it has gone undergone major changes over the years, including the latest with the opening of the Sky Access Line.

I guess the latest route could be divided as follows:
  • Keisei Main Line: Keisei Ueno – Takasago (~13 km), same route as previous Skyliner
  • Hokusō Line: Takasago – Inba Nihon Idai (~32 km), new route for Skyliner using track already in use by an existing urban rail line
  • Narita Sky Access Line: Inba Nihon Idai – Narita Airport Terminal 2 (~18 km), new route for Skyliner using all-new track
  • Keisei Main Line: Narita Airport Terminal 2 – Narita Airport Terminal 1 (~1 km), same route as previous Skyliner
In reality, it's more complicated than this because of various track sharing arrangements with other railways, but for the average passenger, this is the basic breakdown for the new route.

So there's really only about 18 km of all-new track, some of which isn't even on a new route, but paralleling JR into / out of the airport. The rest of the route uses existing track, some of which has been upgraded from 120 kph to 130 kph for the new Skyliner.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 08:36 PM   #1598
lkstrknb
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So, is the CityLiner new? Are they running the old Skyliner trains on the same tracks they've always operated on, but just re-branded the trains?

Thanks, Quashlo for all the work you do on this blog!!!!
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Old August 8th, 2010, 09:11 PM   #1599
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Yes, the Cityliner is a new service that uses the old Skyliner trains. It follows the exact same route as the old Skyliner, but with an additional stop at Aoto to better connect to through-service subway trains to / from the Asakusa Line:
  • Narita Airport Terminal 1
  • Narita Airport Terminal 2
  • Keisei Narita
  • Keisei Funabashi
  • Aoto <-- new stop
  • Nippori
  • Keisei Ueno
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Old August 9th, 2010, 03:24 PM   #1600
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I wonder how much does Narita Skyliner (new AE series) trainset cost?
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