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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:32 AM   #1661
quashlo
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 1): Umi-Shibaura Station, JR Tsurumi Line
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100819tt01.htm

Quote:
Just as the train doors open, the scent of the tides wafts towards us. Just beyond the platform is the endless blue ocean. Basking in the midsummer sunlight, it’s almost as if we can reach out and touch the water’s surface, glistening like silver.

“What a view!” shouts Takimoto Takako (36), who came all the way from Kawagoe City in Saitama Prefecture after reading a magazine article about the place. It’s an early Sunday afternoon, and beyond a buzz of fishing boats and cargo ships, the Shuto Expressway Bayshore Route’s Tsurumi Tsubasa Bridge (Wing Bridge) cuts across the water. “Who knew the water was this close?” Her husband Akihiro (44) couldn’t hide his surprise either as he stared out across the windless ocean, wiping the sweat from his neck.

To railfans, Umi-Shibaura Station is known as “Japan’s closest station to the ocean.” Located inside Tōshiba’s Keihin Plant, non-employees can’t exit the station. But even so, on weekends the platform is abuzz with families and young children. To cater to the fans gathering at the station, the plant constructed a park adjacent to the station 15 years ago.

When the weekday evening rush hour rolls in, the platform is packed with Tōshiba employees hurrying home. On the other hand, more than a few employees let the sardine-can trains pass, taking a short rest in the park as they stare out across the water. Itō Masato (58) was among them.

After graduating from middle school, Itō joined Tōshiba. Since then, he has been getting on and off at this station for over 40 years. After a hard day’s work, the cool ocean wind recharges him on the commute home.

“One time when I arrived at the station for the night shift, I could see fireworks going off right before my eyes, part of a fireworks display they were doing nearby. In reality, this location is to die for,” said a smiling Itō, as he looked out to the sunset over the waters. The ocean, glowing orange, showed another of its faces, a serenity apart from the hussle of the midday.

===================

Stations we use regularly without thinking twice have their own expressions and stories to tell. This summer, we’ve gone on a journey to visit Kanagawa Prefecture’s stations.

Umi-Shibaura Station
Opened 1940 as a station on the Tsurumi Harborfront Railroad. The name of the station comes from Tōshiba’s predecessor Shibaura Plant and the fact that the station borders the ocean. Daily average station entries and exits are 6,550 passengers, most of whom are employees for Tōshiba and associated companies. Umi-Shiba Park is open between 9:00 am and 8:30 pm and is free to the public.
Arriving at Umi-Shibaura Station and taking a walk down the platform. Some of the cars used on the Tsurumi Line are former Yamanote Line cars.


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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:35 AM   #1662
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 2): Gohyakurakan Station, Izu Hakone Railway Daiyūzan Line
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100820tt51.htm

Quote:
The single track leaving Odawara Station and weaving its way through residential neighborhoods forks into two tracks at Gohyakurakan Station, where inbound and outbound trains pass each other.

Small three-car trains glide into both sides of the island platform, and a moment after moving off, an Odakyū Romancecar limited express with red beltline passes on the elevated viaduct right before us. Two different trains pass each other in an elegant crossing—part of what makes this station so popular among railfans.

More than a few railfans visit the station to take pictures. “Another high-school railfan club visited the station last month to take pictures,” said Assistant Official Kurihara Takeyoshi (48).

Today’s visitors, about 10 in all, were from the Kanagawa Prefecture High-School Cultural Alliance Railfan Club composed of railfan clubs from high-schools across Kanagawa Prefecture. “It’s extremely rare to see trains passing each other at a grade-separated crossing like this,” said a smiling Professor Endō Yoshihisa (57) (Hiratsuka Engineering High-School), the club’s advisor.

Endō has been photographing scenes along the Daiyūzan Line with his students for over ten years. He takes care to not just photograph trains, but also to capture pictures of the trains with the old houses and other scenes of daily life. His masterpieces decorate the advertising spaces on all the trains on the line for about one week every autumn, showing off the charm of the line to passengers.

Near the faregates on one of the station building’s concrete walls is engraved the name of the station in Roman alphabet: “500 RAKAN STATION.” Endō makes a photo suggestion: “It’s rare to find numbers in station names. Why don’t you try taking a picture of a train together with the display on the wall?”

===================

Gohyakurakan Station
Opened 1925. The station’s name comes from the adjacent Gyokuhōji Temple, known as Gohyakurakan (lit. “The Five Hundred Arhats”). Inside the main temple is arranged a display of 526 arhat statues, each 24 to 60 cm tall. Daily average station entries and exits are 1,590 passengers. The station building was completely rebuilt in 1989, and the station now occupies the first floor of a four-story apartment building. The project gained fame as real estate “zero minutes walking distance from the station.”

The Daiyūzan Line and Odakyū Odawara Line cross each other near Gohyakurakan Station.

A short journey along the Daiyūzan Line. Gohyakurakan Station makes an appearance at the end.


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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:37 AM   #1663
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 3): Yumegaoka Station, Sōtetsu Izumino Line
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100821tt51.htm

Quote:
A domed canopy completely encapsulates the platform. Amidst an open interior space without a column in sight, trains glide into the station, the light glinting off their silver bodies.

Yumegaoka Station, which opened in 1999 with the extension of the Sōtetsu Izumino Line, is somehow reminiscent of the near future. A few steps outside the faregates, however, is a sea of cropfields. The number of houses can be counted by hand and bell pepper and corn plants dominate the area.

“In keeping with the scenery, the station is designed to be reminiscent of a greenhouse,” explains Stationmaster Kaneko Toshirō (53). The station almost seems like a miniature house built in the middle of a garden—enough to earn it a designation as one of the “Top 100 Kantō Region Stations to Visit” from the Kantō District Transport Bureau.

Daily average station entries and exits for last fiscal year were 2,006 passengers. While relegated to the worst ridership among Sōtetsu’s 25 stations, the station is abuzz during the winter with school students who are preparing for their exams. The students are after the special “Yumekibo tickets” (lit. “Dream-Hope tickets”) for trips between Yumegaoka (lit. “Dream Hill”) and Kibōgaoka (lit. “Hope Hill”) Stations. The tickets are popular as good-luck charms for students hoping to be accepted to their first-choice school.

Of the approx. 13,000 total tickets sold between the two stations from January to November of last year, over 90 percent were purchased between the New Year’s period and March, when test-taking season is in full swing. “We were only looking to bring a little joy to local residents living along the line, but it appears the tickets have spread among students taking tests who think of them as good-luck charms,” explains administrative manager Hikawa Kazunori (36). “Some of the children even come to let us know that they were accepted. We’re lucky to be working at the station,” remarks a grinning Stationmaster Kaneko.

On clear days, passengers can see all the way to Mt. Fuji from the platform, and on New Year’s Day, railfans gather to take photographs of the scene. Even among the countless number of stations in Kanagawa Prefecture, this is one station whose “luck” stands head and shoulders above the rest.

===================

Yumegaoka Station
“Yumekibo tickets” (adult: ¥260; children: ¥130) are also popular as good-luck charms for easy childbirth or marriage. The tickets are on sale at the ticket counters at both stations throughout the year, and from year’s end through to March, buyers also receive ema (votive plaques). During this period, it’s become a tradition for ema stands to be set up at both stations, with the ema eventually burnt at Samukawa Shrine (Samukawa Town).
Couple pictures:

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Ema stand

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Sōtetsu Izumino Line window view from Futamatagawa to Shōnandai. Yumegaoka Station appears at 13:00.


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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:40 AM   #1664
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 4): JR Kawasaki Station
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100822tt52.htm

Quote:
Trains with a colorful array of different beltlines—from a double-stripe yellow-and-orange to a solid sky blue—arrive one after another at the station, and then leave. The view of the station looking down from 20 stories above the ground is almost like the railway models I used to play with as a child.

“Look! There’s a blue train coming now!” “Four trains running at the same time!” Hoshino Yūki (8) and his younger brother Takuya (6), foreheads glued to the glass windows, continue with their “live reports” to their father Masafumi (47) from inside a double room in the Kawasaki Nikkō Hotel outside JR Kawasaki Station.

Masafumi, who had come from Numata City, Gunma Prefecture to stay at the hotel, watched fondly over his two sons giddy with excitement: “Neither of them has much chance to see trains, so I wanted them to spend some time and enjoy this.”

A special railway guest plan that allows guests to stay in the top floors of the hotel with views of the trains below is popular. In June of last year, the hotel began offering the special stay plan, allowing guests to enjoy views of the three lines that serve Kawasaki Station: the Tōkaidō Line, the Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and the Nambu Line.

The idea was implemented in an effort to break through the economic malaise that kicked in two years ago, and the rate is ¥9,000 a night for a single room. “I was really skeptical whether they would sell or not,” said marketing manager Miyazaki Manabu (45) as he looked back to when the plan was in its infancy.

After the doors opened, though, the plan has become a hit, with 30 to 40 reservations a month. There is no shortage of railfans who say they don’t want even to stay, but just come to take pictures.

In December of last year, the hotel began offering a new campaign offering views of Keikyū Line trains arriving at Keikyū Kawasaki Station. “Thanks to the trains, we’ve broke through into a whole new customer demographic,” remarked a satisfied Miyazaki.

===================

JR Kawasaki Station
Hotels offering various types of railway plans have recently been debuting. At the Hotel Associa Shin-Yokohama outside Shin-Yokohama Station (Kōhoku Ward, Yokohama City), guests are even offered a special service where children can dress up as a Shinkansen crew member and take souvenir pictures. And at the Akihabara Washington Hotel (Chiyoda Ward, Tōkyō) outside Akihabara Station, room interiors are decorated with train models.
Tōkaidō Main Line during the busy morning commute period (7:30 to 9:45 am), sped up 7x. Trains on the Tōkaidō Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and Yokosuka Line / Shōnan-Shinjuku Line. Also the Tsurumi Line on the truss bridge above and the Keikyū Main Line barely peeking in from the left.


Source: genki100bai1969 on YouTube
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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:44 AM   #1665
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 5): JR Yokosuka Station
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100823tt01.htm

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JR Yokosuka Station, surrounded by military bases for the United States Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Forces—the station building, still with vestiges of the Taishō Era, is known as one of the few stations in Japan without any stairwells.

The journey from the platforms to the station plaza is entirely level, without bridges or underground passages. Stationmaster Kosaki Eiichi explains, “Yokosuka was a former military epicenter. I’ve heard that they designed it this way to handle goods and personnel transport, and for the Imperial family when they came to visit to see the christening and launch of ships.”

The Yokosuka Line itself opened during the Meiji Era at the request of military authorities—mainly because Yokosuka was so isolated, despite all the military installations scattered everywhere. After opening, special Imperial trains carrying His Majesty the Emperor would be run every so often, and even now, “reserved (for the Emperor)” signs are still preserved at the station.

On the side of the station facing the water remains part of a concrete wall (about 2.5 m tall and 40 m long) shielding the military facilities from passengers’ eyes. “One time, one of the older folks came to encourage me, saying, “A long time ago, there was one stationmaster who lowered his saber (and let down his guard). You be careful now,’” joked Stationmaster Koseki.

The days of soldiers running about the station are over, and nowadays, the majority of passengers are commuters heading to and from work and school. If only by chance, the step-free design of the station is a precursor to today’s barrier-free stations, and passengers in wheelchairs have been a common sight at the station for many decades now. “After weaving your way through the mountains of the Miura Peninsula, you’re greeted with the scene of military ships out in the harbor. Nothing says ‘Yokosuka’ like this,” says Kitahara Ichirō (51), who has been commuting from Zushi City to his job as a Yokosuka City municipal employee for a little over 20 years.

Looking at Zushi from the steam train
We’ve already arrived at Yokosuka
Feast your eyes on the splendor of our vessels
Assembled at the docks

(“The Railway Song”)

===================

JR Yokosuka Station
The Ōfuna – Yokosuka section of the Yokosuka Line opened in 1889, the Yokosuka – Kurihama section in 1944. Daily average station entries and exits at Yokosuka Station are approx. 12,000 passengers. The current station building was constructed in 1940.
E217 series in “Yokosuka” colors of navy blue and cream. The E217s are the main trains used on the Yokosuka Line, although there are E231 series from the Shōnan-Shinjuku line, as well as Narita Express trains and others, on other parts of the line. Basic formation is 11 cars, with additional four-car sets that can be tacked on to make 15-car trains.


Source: RAILWAYMOVIES on YouTube

Due to a geography that sometimes forces stations to be squeezed in between hills and cliffs, the southern end of the Yokosuka Line has some peculariaties, including this door cut at Taura Station. The station is hemmed in by tunnels at both ends and the platforms aren’t quite long enough to serve a full-length eleven-car train (the four-car units don’t go south past Zushi).


Source: karibajct on YouTube
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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:47 AM   #1666
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 6): Nebukawa Station, Tōkaidō Line
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100824tt02.htm

Quote:
Mountains encroach to the very edge of the coastline along Sagami Bay. Passing through the tunnel and crossing a steel bridge, a rustic station comes into view nestled between the ocean and the mountain slopes.

The station building, one of the few remaining still made of wood, was completed in 1924 (Taishō 13). The old station building was swallowed up by a landslide in the Great Kantō Earthquake a year before, sinking into the depths of the ocean together with a train.

As peculiar as it might seem, there is no “Platform 1” at the station. The side facing the mountains opposite inbound Platform 2 is empty; Platform 3 and Platform 4 are on the other side facing the ocean.

Aoki Takanori (56), manager of a nearby orange grove, unravels the mystery: “It used to be a platform exclusively for freight trains carrying oranges. Delivery by truck has become commonplace now, so it disappeared.”

The area around the station was one of the top orange-producing areas in Kanagawa Prefecture. When Aoki was still going to elementary school, he frequently saw his father carrying wooden crates full of oranges to the station. “Platform 1 disappeared around 1970 or so,” recalls Aoki.

Starting in 1980s, the number of orange groves decreased with the relaxation of regulations on importing oranges, and fields near the station were transformed into resort hotels. With population aging proceeding apace, the local middle school also closed its doors in March of this year.

Aoki and other growers are currently pouring their efforts into increasing production of a new cultivar of orange known as the “Shōnan Gold.” Yellow like a lemon and with a refreshing sweetness, Aoki is hopeful: “I want to make it into a brand that will bring prosperity back to our town.”

The ocean spread out beneath the station is a secret hotspot for diving. The area features underwater shoals with fish including chicken grunts and amberjack, and portions of the platform that sunk in the earthquake have become homes for leopard moray eels and nudibranchs.

Okada Kazuya (37) of Nebukawa Diving Center, where visitors from Tōkyō and Yokohama can enjoy a day-trip out diving, says, “There’s a lot of diving enthusiasts who get addicted to diving here, but eventually move off to the Izu area, where the waters are more beautiful.”

===================

Nebukawa Station
Opened in 1922 as a station on the former National Railways’ Atami Line, simultaneously with Hayakawa and Manazaru Stations. Two years later, the line was extended to Yugawara Station. Daily average station entries and exits are approx. 1,300 passengers—lowest of all stations on the Tōkaidō Line through Kanagawa Prefecture, and the only unmanned station on the line. A monument commemorating victims of the Great Kantō Earthquake stands next to the faregates.
Nebukawa Station is close to the outermost extents of JR East’s jurisdiction over the Tōkaidō Main Line (the boundary is at Atami).

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Nice rustic platform bridge

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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:50 AM   #1667
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 7): JR Tsurumi Station
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100825tt01.htm

Quote:
Wooden benches stand silently on Platform 4, while in one tucked-away corner, an old clock quietly marks the passage of time.

Words are engraved onto a plate underneath the clock: “We wish you the best. From the Tsurumi area repatriates.” The clock was a gift to Tsurumi Station from Koreans returning to North Korea under the repatriation program that began at the end of 1959.

Yokohama City’s Tsurumi Ward was where the majority of Koreans commandeered from their homeland during the wartime years lived, working in the factories along the waterfront areas. The deceased husband of Kwon San-ho (88) was one of those working in the factories, and in 1948, Kwon crossed the strait to join her husband in Japan. It’s estimated that about 30 percent of all the Koreans (North and South) in Yokohama City in 1959 lived in Tsurumi Ward.

“Despite the recent end of the war and the difficult living we all had to make, some of the Japanese shared their bread rations with us. Everyone was kind,” says Kwon. When the repatriation program to North Korea was finalized, her Japanese neighbors were happy for her.

The orchestrator of the fundraising campaign to purchase the clock was a Japanese person from the Tsurumi Repatriation Cooperation Association. Newspapers from that time record the words of a grateful stationmaster: “It’s wonderful… There’s no clocks in the station.”

Ethnic Koreans in Tsurumi boarded trains from Tsurumi Station, and after meeting up at Ueno Station with their countrymen from all across Japan, returned to their homeland on boats departing from Niigata. On a spring day half a century ago, Kwon recalls seeing off to Ueno Station one woman who was the chair of the local ladies’ association. The woman frequently invited Kwon to eat out with her and was much like an older sister to her. On a platform that echoed with cries of joy, Kwon clasped the woman’s hands until it was time for the train to depart. The image of her friend’s tears at that moment are engrained in Kwon’s memory.

Kwon’s younger brother (by three years) returned to North Korea in the 1960s. When she met with him in Pyongyang last year, they both knew that they could well be meeting for the last time. And yet, Kwon still hopes to one day visit her parents’ graves in South Korea with her brother.

Her “older sister” and brother, who returned home full of hopes and dreams. And Kwon, who chose to stay behind in Japan with her family. Kwon stared at the old clock, gently touching the clockface.

===================

JR Tsurumi Station
Opened in 1872. The Tsurumi Harborfront Railroad, which expanded together with the development of the Keihin Industrial Belt, reached Tsurumi Station at the beginning of the Shōwa Era, transforming the station into the gateway to the waterfront area. In 1943, the Tsurumi Harborfront Railroad was nationalized, becoming the Tsurumi Line, but vestiges of the railroad’s history remain: Even now, passengers transferring from the Keihin-Tōhoku Line platforms to the Tsurumi Line platforms have to exit through the faregates first.
A short journey on the Tsurumi Line. The line consists of multiple branches and serves almost exclusively the factories and industrial uses on the waterfront. The start of the video is Tsurumi Station, where you can barely make out the clock from the article hanging on the wall.


Source: jh1kss on YouTube
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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:52 AM   #1668
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Kanagawa station tours (Part 8): Kodomo no Kuni Station, Kodomo no Kuni Line
http://otona.yomiuri.co.jp/trip/railnews/100826tt51.htm

Quote:
Children with large swim rings and inflatable water toys shaped into fish run out of the faregates shouting in anticipation—ultimately destined for the outdoor pool inside Kodomo no Kuni (Children’s Land) theme park.

The crowding outside the station, reminiscent of the morning commute rush, is an all-too-familiar sight on weekends during summer vacation.

Kodomo no Kuni opened in 1965, and the Kodomo no Kuni Line opened in April 1967 as the public transport access to the park. The line is the only single-track line in the Tōkyū network, and covers a mere 3.4 km from Nagatsuta Station to the terminal at Kodomo no Kuni Station. The scene of small two-car trains passing through a rich green landscape somehow hearkens to a familiar time from the past.

Kodomo no Kuni, a mere two minutes from the station faregates, is a giant natural playground that takes advantage of the Tama Hills geography. Children play to their heart’s content in public squares and ranches and amidst the forest.

In the midst of a struggling economy, the park is gaining popularity because it’s cheap, it’s nearby, and it’s short and sweet, and many families with children come from Tōkyō Prefecture to visit the park by train.

Office worker Uchiyama Tatsunari (28) and his wife Akane (29) were visiting the park with their son Ōsei (2) from Meguro Ward. Akane appeared thoroughly pleased: “It’s great that they have a pool that even small children can safely play in. And even if they get tired of the pool, there’s plenty of playground equipment to last an entire day.”

While the station might be small, daily average station entries and exits are over 10,000 passengers. And when summer vacation ends, the autumn hiking season begins. The station is filled with children’s smiles all seasons of the year.

===================

Kodomo no Kuni Station
Kodomo no Kuni opened on Children’s Day (May 5) 1965, funded by money donated to commemorate the marriage of the Emperor. The combination fee for park entrance and use of the outdoor pool is ¥1,100 for adults, ¥450 for elementary and middle school children, and ¥350 for young children (3 years or older). The park also features a shallow pool for younger children. The park is open from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm (until August) every day, but closed Wednesdays.
The Kodomo no Kuni Line is mostly known for its access to the theme park, but as a feeder line to the Den’en Toshi Line, it also sees its fair share of commuter traffic.


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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:54 AM   #1669
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Tōkyū opens new “community cafe” along Setagaya Line
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...802000029.html

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Next to Yamashita Station on the Tōkyū Setagaya Line in Gōtokuji, Setagaya Ward, Tamaden Cafe Yamashita, a community cafe housed in formerly vacant retail space, will open on September 1. The new cafe was established by Machicollabo, a local nonprofit dedicated to building community, in an effort to revitalize neighborhoods along the rail line. An open house was held on August 27.

Tamaden (lit. “Tama Train”) is the nickname of the Tamagawa Line, the predecessor of the Setagaya Line. The new facility features gallery and cafe space in approx. 40 sq m. The cafe will offer coffee, green tea, and other beverages for sale, and locals can enjoy conversation while sipping tea.

The cafe will also offer several locally-themed goods for purchase, including maneki-neko ecobags drawing from legends about cats at the nearby Gōtokuji Temple; Tamaden yōkan; cookies; and coloring sets. The cafe will also lease conference and display space.

For the opening, the cafe displayed pictures of the Setagaya Line and its neighborhoods on the walls as well as a model train diorama.

The property is owned by Tōkyū Corporation, and remained empty for many years after a cafe vacated the space. Director Shibata Maki (48) of Machicollabo, also a resident of the neighborhood, was hopeful: “This is the entrance to the Yamashita retail corridor, and more than anything, we wanted to light up the storefront. I’m hoping we can hold events that will allow us to advertise the alleyways in this retro retail corridor.”
The Setagaya Line is a small tram line operating in an exclusive right-of-way through Setagaya Ward, Tōkyō. It’s only 5.0 km long, with 10 stations. This and the Toden Arakawa Line are the last tram lines operating within the boundaries of Tōkyō Prefecture.

Yamashita Station:

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Setagaya Line window view. This must be the slowest speaking conductor I’ve ever heard.
Source: seigen120kaihin on YouTube

Sangenjaya to Kamimachi



Kamimachi to Shimo-Takaido

__________________

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Old September 15th, 2010, 10:58 AM   #1670
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Open house sessions for elevation / undergrounding of Sasazuka – Tsutsujigaoka section of Keiō Line
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...502000025.html

Quote:
In the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government’s proposed grade-separation (undergrounding and elevation) of the Keiō Line through Setagaya Ward and Suginami Ward between Sasazuka and Tsutsujigaoka Stations in order to eliminate problems associated with grade crossings that rarely open, Setagaya Ward officials and others will hold open house sessions to explain the project to local residents at eight locations located near each of the eight stations between Daitabashi and Chitose – Karasuyama. Residents welcome the resolution of the problems with the grade crossings that rarely open, but in regards to the elevation of the line, some have called for undergrounding all the tracks, citing issues with aesthetics and vibration.

The master plan to elevate the line was approved in 1969. The plan had initially called for taking the entire section—all double-track—and converting it to a quadruple-track elevated line, but in a draft master plan published by the Metropolitan Government in November of last year, the additional two tracks proposed in the quadruple-tracking were changed to underground tracks. Of the approx. 8 km section between Sasazuka and Tsutsujigaoka Stations, approx. 7.1 km between Sasazuka and Senkawa Stations will be elevated.

The construction costs associated with undergrounding the line are more expensive, but there is little difference in expenses when compared to the cost of land acquisition required to elevate the line, and time and effort can be saved in the negotiation for land. No stations will be built underground, and limited express trains will run from the Tama area through the two wards and into Shinjuku.

In addition, on the section between Daitabashi and Chitose – Karasuyama Stations, elevation of Hachimanyama Station has already been completed, but an additional seven stations will also need to be elevated. On this section, there are 25 grade crossings that remain closed for a cumulative total of 50 minutes or more during the morning rush hour, and the goal is to alleviate roadway congestion. The majority of these crossings, 23 in total, are concentrated in Setagaya Ward.

Of the total project cost of approx. ¥220 billion, about 70 percent is related to the elevation portion of the project, of which 15 percent will be borne by Keiō Corporation and the remaining 85 percent will be shared between the Metropolitan Government and the two wards using grant money from the national government. The cost of the undergrounding portion of the project will be borne by Keiō Corporation.

The Metropolitan Government plans to compile the master plan by next spring, and after approval of the plan revisions in the Urban Planning Committee in FY2012, hopes to receive project selection in FY2013. For approximately ten years after that, the line will be elevated, and another four years after that, the undergrounding will be carried out.

In regards to the draft plan, the Metropolitan Government held workshops at each of the eight stations in November of last year. While some critics called for undergrounding all the tracks, citing concerns over aesthetics and vibration, the Metropolitan Government explained that “construction of underground stations would substantially increase the construction cost and extend the construction schedule.”

Starting with a session at the Matsuzawa Community-Building Center on September 11 between 2:00 and 4:30 pm, the open house sessions will be held on weekday evenings and weekend afternoons, in the hope of also explaining the plan to residents who were unable to make the workshop sessions. Officials will introduce the project using panel displays and other tools, and representatives from both wards will comment and answer questions regarding the draft plan. With the elevation of the line, Setagaya Ward is also planning to construct connector roads to arterial roadways at Meidaimae and Chitose – Karasuyama Stations and station plazas allowing for bus and taxi pickup and dropoff, and will also explain the urban planning for the project.
Window view from a Keiō Line semi-special express from Shinjuku to Takao-san-guchi.
Source: seigen120kaihin on YouTube

Part 1: Shinjuku to Chōfu



Part 2: Chōfu to Takahata Fudō



Part 3: Takahata Fudō to Yamada



Part 4: Yamada to Takao-san-guchi

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:01 AM   #1671
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Chōfu City seeks public comment on Keiō Line station plaza designs
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...202000021.html

Quote:
Currently on display inside the second-floor lobby of Chōfu City Hall are architectural models based on the basic design proposals for station plazas at Chōfu, Fuda, and Kokuryō Stations—all in the process of being undergrounded as part of the Keiō Line Continuous Grade-Separation Project. The goal of the display is to advertise to a wide audience of city residents just how the station plazas will look when the stations are finally undergrounded.

The models had previously been on display at project informational sessions for the station plaza design proposals being held by the city until July. Based on a basic design concept of cities as “bustling gardens to be shared by all,” the station plazas are primarily structured into a “public square zone” for multi-purpose use as event space or rest space and a “rotary zone” designed for smooth circulation of buses and taxis.

There is a need to continue moving forward on the station plaza projects, with a target date of FY2012, when the Keiō Line Continuous Grade-Separation Project will be completed. Spokespersons for the city’s Urban Planning Projects Section have said, “Believing that the majority of citizens have no idea how the station areas will change, we decided to release these models. I hope we can receive a wide array of feedback from the public by the end of the fiscal year, while we’re still in the basic design stage.” Questionnaire forms are also provided next to the models. The models will be on public display until September 30.
I posted a video earlier of a presentation by Chōfu City introducing the proposed station plaza for Chōfu Station:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1295

Now, some simulation renderings for the plazas at all three stations:
Source: Chōfu City

Chōfu Station station plaza

Left to right: Fountain area; Multi-purpose square 1; South Rotary entrance



Left to right: Main station entrance; South Rotary; Multi-purpose square 3



Fuda Station station plaza

Left to right: Rotary entrance; Rotary exit



Left to right: Rotary exit; Private auto pickup / dropoff



Left to right: From main station entrance; Disabled passenger pickup / dropoff



Kokuryō Station station plaza

Left to right: From Komae-dōri (west); From rotary entrance



Left to right: From Komae-dōri (east); Disabled passenger pickup / dropoff and bus bays



Left to right: Bus bays; Taxi pool

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:05 AM   #1672
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Shibasaki Station area residents demand action to improve grade crossing
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/tok...OYT8T00146.htm

Quote:
The Committee for Improvement of Shibasaki Station and Surroundings, which calls for environmental improvements outside Shibasaki Station on the Keiō Line in Chōfu City, has been established, and committee members have been handing out flyers announcing their upcoming petition effort outside the station. The committee plans to establish a registration center outside the station in mid-September, with members set to canvass the retail districts to gather signatures, saying they hope to “gather 10,000 signatures for now and request that the city and Keiō Corporation begin implementing improvements as soon as possible.”

According to Keiō Corporation, the grade crossing at the station connecting two roadways is narrow, at approx. 7.8 m, and during the morning commute period between 7:00 and 9:00 am on weekdays, over 90 trains pass through the crossing across both directions. Committee chairman Motoki Terumasa (73) couldn’t hold back his sighs: “Day in and day out, the crossing rarely opens during the rush hour. The morning period is particularly dangerous for the elderly and the physically disabled.”

In early June, a total of 30 residents in the neighborhood founded the committee to urge Chōfu City and Keiō Corporation to improve the situation. Starting this month, committee members are now standing outside the station in the early morning, banners in place, handing out flyers announcing the start of a signature-gathering effort. The committee has prepared a total of 5,000 flyers, and plans to distribute them outside the station on the evenings of September 6 and 7 as well.

According to the city and Keiō Corporation, construction for a continuous grade-separation project on the Keiō Line and Sagamihara Line is currently underway. The Tōkyō Metropolitan Government is the project lead, and total project cost is approx. ¥115 billion. Between FY2002 and FY2012, the city is scheduled to bear approx. ¥7.5 billion of the cost.

Approx. 2.8 km on the Keiō Line spanning across the three stations of Chōfu, Fuda, and Kokuryō will be improved. With the completion of the project in FY2012, the three stations will be undergrounded, and the grade crossings outside the stations will be eliminated. Although not part of this project segment, elevation of the station concourse at Nishi-Chōfu Station is also currently underway, and the new station building will open by the end of the fiscal year.

However, Shibasaki Station is not part of the project, and the same station building has been in use since 1957, with repeated renovations and expansions. Daily entries and exits at the station are 17,753 (FY2009), but according to Keiō Corporation’s public relations department, “Although there is a future improvement plan, nothing has been specifically decided as of yet.”

In late July, committee director Watanabe Shinjirō (68) visited Mayor Nagatomo Yoshiki (57) at City Hall to demand improvements, but a detailed plan for improvements has yet to be announced. “Shibasaki Station alone is being left behind. It’s already too late to start when grade crossing accidents have already happened, so I hope they’ll do something about it as quickly as possible.”

Distribution of flyers will be completed by September 7, and the committee plans to begin gathering signatures in mid-September.
Train congestion during the morning rush hour on the Keiō Line at Meidaimae, a major interchange with the Inokashira Line. All trains stop here, but there are only two side platforms, resulting in train backups that also end up keeping the crossing arms down for extended periods of time. Makes it easier to understand why they not only want to grade-separate all this but also quadruple-track it—and why the people at Shibasaki might feel a little shafted.
Source: lukethgospelwriter on YouTube

2010 version



2009 version



2002 version

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:07 AM   #1673
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Last remaining section for elevation of JR Chūō Line to be completed in November
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...302000062.html

Quote:
In the elevation of the JR Chūō Line between Nishi-Kokubunji and Tachikawa (approx. 3 km) being carried out by the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government, JR East, and others with the goal of eliminating grade crossings that rarely open, the switchout of the remaining section of inbound track will be completed on the morning of November 7, eliminating five crossings between Kunitachi and Tachikawa.

Of the grade crossings to be eliminated, three were known as “crossings that rarely open,” staying closed for a cumulative total of 40 minutes or more during the morning commute rush. Of these, two still remain closed for a cumulative total of 30 minutes or more during the hour, even after the outbound track has already been elevated.

The switchout construction will take place between 9:30 pm on November 6 and 6:30 am November 7. A total of 101 trains across both directions will be cancelled or have their trips shortened, and it’s expected that approx. 51,400 passengers will be affected. In addition to operating replacement bus service between Nishi-Kokubunji and Tachikawa, JR East’s Hachiōji Branch Office is also calling on passengers to switch to the Musashino Line and Nambu Line: “It’s expected that congestion will be heavy, so please avoid using the trains during this period.”

Since FY1995, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government has invested a total of approx. ¥171 billion on elevating the Chūō Line between Mitaka and Tachikawa (approx. 13 km), and in December of last year, completed work on the section between Mitaka and Kokubunji (approx. 6.2 km). With the upcoming completion of the construction, 18 grade crossings will be eliminated.
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:09 AM   #1674
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GuruNavi launches interactive digital signage unit on JR Shibuya Station platform
http://www.asahi.com/digital/cnet/CNT201007260081.html

Quote:
On July 26, Gourmet Navigator (GuruNavi) announced that it has installed a “GuruNavi Board” digital signage unit on the counterclockwise platform at JR Shibuya Station, allowing passengers to use a touch-screen panel to search for information on restaurants.

The GuruNavi Board is a digital signage unit featuring a touch-screen panel and two 46 in tall vertical screens. The board will distribute various content, including top search rankings on foodie site GuruNavi and tweets about restaurants posted on Twitter, as well as overlay tweet spots on top of a map.

The restaurant information can be retrieved by placing a mobile phone atop a FeliCa port. In addition, the unit features a facial recognition camera to help determine the effectiveness of the program, as well as work in tandem with the displayed content. GuruNavi is hoping to increase awareness of its services through use of the GuruNavi Board. In coordination with NTT Docomo and NKB, GuruNavi says it will be looking to provide a content scheme that combines the display unit and mobile phones.
Couple pictures:
CNET Japan



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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:12 AM   #1675
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North-south public passage at JR Shin-Koiwa Station to break ground in FY2012
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/tok...OYT8T00144.htm

Quote:
JR Shin-Koiwa Station in Katsushika Ward, which has suffered from the inconvenience of not having a passage that cuts through the station, will now see the construction of a public passage that will connect its North Exit and South Exit. Last month, Katsushika Ward and JR East signed a memorandum of understanding. The Ward Government is aiming for a groundbreaking in FY2012, with the hope of unifying the currently-segregated retail districts north and south of the station and increasing the accessibility of the area for shoppers and others.

According to the Ward Government, the station boasts the highest ridership in the entire ward: 140,000 passengers daily. However, moving between the station’s North Exit and South Exit has required the use of a pedestrian path near the station passing beneath the elevated viaduct—a path that requires a lengthy detour and is so narrow that collisions between pedestrians and bicyclists were a common occurrence. As a result, the local town association and retail districts have been petitioning the Ward Government and JR to construct a north-south public passage at the station for over 20 years now.

In response, the Ward Government and JR have been in talks, but little headway was made owing to disagreement over how to share the burden of the expensive cost of the project and other issues. This time, JR’s share of the costs was reduced by building a portion of the public passage as a prefectural roadway, and on August 12, a memorandum of understanding was signed.

The new public passage will be constructed beneath the platforms at the station, stretching approx. 90 m long and 10 m wide. The corridor will be designed step-free, allowing the elderly and users with physical disabilities to pass through without using elevators or escalators.

A preliminary estimate pegs the construction cost at ¥8 billion. The plan is to use Special Ward Finance Regulatory Grant money and other sources to fund the project. With the construction of the new public passage, the station concourse and station administrative facilities will be replaced, and the North Exit—currently without a traffic circle, will be the home of a new station plaza (5,100 sq m) connected to the passage, with a bus terminal and other amenities.

The Ward Government will complete basic design by the end of the fiscal year and expects to complete construction in FY2015 or FY2016. On September 3, Katsushika Ward mayor Aoki Katsunori met with JR East and JR Freight, where he said, “I want to make this a catalyst for urban planning in the area around Shin-Koiwa Station, which is the face of southern Katsushika.”

Mitsuya Kenzō, chairman of the Shin-Koiwa North District Urban Planning Committee formed of the local town association and retail associations, was pleased: “We can finally begin working towards redevelopment of the north and south areas of the station as a whole.”
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:14 AM   #1676
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JR East selects illumination scheme for Tōkyō Station restoration
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20100906.pdf

Quote:
Regarding the illumination of the Marunouchi Station Building at Tōkyō Station following completion of the preservation and restoration work, we have selected a final design. Based around new concepts fitting for a restored station building, the design will contribute to the creation of a stylish evening skyline for the capital Tōkyō.

Designer and design concept
  • Following the acceptance of design proposals, Mende Kaoru was selected as designer after receiving the highest evaluation score among the proposals.
  • Design concept: “Gentle Scene”
    The concept proposed by Mende is befitting of timeless and dignified architecture and aims for a gentle expression that can be naturally received by everyone.
  • Mende Kaoru
    Born 1950. Completed a master’s degree at Tōkyō University of the Arts’ Graduate School of Fine Arts. Founded Lighting Planners Associates, Inc. in 1990 and serves as representative director of the firm. His portfolio includes the Kyōto Station Building, the Tōkyō International Forum, the National Museum of Singapore, the Kyōto State Guest House, and Meiji Shrine.
Environmental strategy
With the goal of realizing an environmentally-friendly illumination scheme, the illumination units used in the illumination scheme will consist entirely of LEDs.

Illumination start
The illumination scheme is scheduled to be implemented together with the completion of the preservation and restoration work for the Marunouchi Station Building in spring 2012.





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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:20 AM   #1677
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JR East announces renovation scheme for station retail at Tōkyō, Ueno, Shinagawa Stations
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20100905.pdf

Quote:
As part of our “Station Renaissance” program, JR East Group will conduct a renovation of our ekinaka (station retail) facilities at major terminals in the Greater Tōkyō area—namely, the first floor of Tōkyō Station inside the Yaesu-Minami Exit faregates; inside the Kōen Exit faregates at Ueno Station; and inside the Central Gates at Shinagawa Station, opening the renovations to the public in March 2011.

Details of the full-scale renovation
In order to provide the customers using our stations daily with a more convenient and more pleasant experience, we are proceeding with improvements as part of our “Station Renaissance” program.
  • At Tōkyō Station, we are proceeding with improvements as part of our Tōkyō Station City project, and now, as one element of that plan, based on the theme of a “people- and environment-friendly lifestyle,” we will renovate the passage leading from the first floor of Tōkyō Station inside the paid area at the Yaesu-Minami Exit to the Keiyō Line platforms, renaming it as “Keiyō Street.”
  • In response to changes in the environment surrounding the station, we will conduct renovations of the paid area at the Kōen Exit at Ueno Station and inside Dila and surrounding stores in the paid area of the Central Gates at Shinagawa Station, with the aim of improving the attractiveness of the station and surrounding area. The concepts for this renovation are “Co-Existence and Co-Creation with the Neighborhood” for Ueno Station, and “Always Making New Discoveries” for Shinagawa Station.
Opening schedule
All the station retail facilities are scheduled for full grand reopenings in March 2011, but some stores will open beforehand on the following dates:
  1. Renovation of the first floor of Tōkyō Station inside the Yaesu-Minami Exit faregates: October 2010
  2. Renovation inside the Kōen Exit faregates at Ueno Station: December 2010
  3. Renovation inside the Central Gates at Shinagawa Station: December 2010
Management company
All station retail facilities will be developed and managed by JR East Retail Net Co., Ltd. (President and Representative Director: Natsume Makoto).

Renovation of first floor of Tōkyō Station inside the Yaesu-Minami Exit faregates
Location: Marunouchi 1-chōme, Chiyoda Ward, Tōkyō; JR Tōkyō Station, First Floor, paid area at Yaesu-Minami Exit
Development area: Approx. 2,400 sq m
Store area: Approx. 1,400 sq m
Number of stores: 27 (scheduled)
Tenant mix: Japanese and Western sweets, prepared foods, accessories, restaurants, cafes, bakeries, bookstores, convenience stores, etc.
Estimated sales: Approx. ¥6.2 billion annually
  • Area name: Keiyō Street
    Given the size of Tōkyō Station and the difficulty in determining position within the station, we have decided to assign a name to the area. Similar to the South Court which opened in March and the North Court scheduled to open in December, we will name the area to be renovated in this latest project as Keiyō Street.
  • Renewal concept: Tōkyō Green Style
    The facility will propose and disseminate a lifestyle that is people- and environment-friendly.
  • Design concept: Park Terrace Communication
    Like relaxing in a park where you are surrounded by verdant trees and bright rays of sunlight come shining through, we will create an interior space that allows visitors a breath of relaxation, despite being in the midst of the urban metropolis.
  • Development details
    • Based on the concept that keeping things and continuously reusing them is important, at the accessories stores, we will offer goods that bring color to the daily routine and inspire affection.
    • At the prepared foods and Japanese and western sweets shops, we will adhere to local food and use seasonal ingredients.
    • We will develop bakeries, cafes, and flower shops based on the theme of vegetables. All will focus on the main element of vegetables, and provide a new way to enjoy vegetables.
    • In regards to shops directly managed by JR East Retail Net Co., Ltd., including NEWDAYS convenience stores, we will offer a new lifestyle that incorporates green thinking.
    • We will renovate the adjacent station information center, and in addition to the current directional guidance services, will provide various information, including distribution of a “Green Walking Map” and notices for eco-events.


Current and after renovation



Current and after renovation



Renovation inside the Kōen Exit faregates at Ueno Station
Location: Ueno 7-chōme, Taitō Ward, Tōkyō; JR Ueno Station, Third Floor, paid area
Development area: Approx. 10,500 sq m
Store area: Approx. 4,800 sq m
Number of stores: 78 (scheduled)
Tenant mix: Prepared foods, Japanese and Western sweets, accessories, restaurants, bookstores, cafes, bakeries, etc.
Estimated sales: Approx. ¥13.8 billion annually
  • Renewal concept: With Harmony
    At Ueno Station—a fusion of shitamachi areas historically rich in craftsman spirit with the lively cultural, historical, and natural scenes of the Bunkyō area, a concentration of art museums, history museums, and zoological parks—we will seek to unite “forest,” “station,” and “city” and develop a relationship of co-existence and co-creation with the local neighborhood.
  • Design concept: Artisan Promenade
    We will create an interior space that expresses the natural elements of Ueno’s forest and the artisan spirit of Ueno’s craftsmen, enriching customers’ hearts.
  • Development details
    • Through provision of products that advertise the Ueno area and distribution of “Town Walking Maps,” we will increase the ease of excursions from the station into the neighborhood.
    • At stores dealing in food sales, we will offer an array of Japanese confections and Western-style sweets based on the theme of animals. We will develop stores rich in individuality where customers can experience the warmth and love of the chef’s hands, such as prepared foods stores that emphasize product quality.
    • At restaurants, we will offer an array of stores where female customers can feel comfortable entering when alone, and develop ekinaka-original menus and menus that strive for the best in ingredients and culinary skill.
    • We will deploy concierge staff inside cafes, attentively responding to customers requests, such as information about area facilities.


Current and after renovation



Current and after renovation



Renovation inside the Central Gates at Shinagawa Station
Location: Takanawa 3-chōme, Minato Ward, Tōkyō; JR Ueno Station, paid area inside Central Gates
Development area: Approx. 4,700 sq m
Store area: Approx. 2,700 sq m
Number of stores: 35 (scheduled)
Tenant mix: Restaurants, cafes, Japanese and Western sweets, prepared foods, bookstores, accessories, bakeries, convenience stores, etc.
Estimated sales: Approx. ¥9.6 billion annually
  • Renewal concept: Smart Heartful Style
    We will offer high-quality original products and seasonal, time-sensitive menus that embody the hearts of their creators, constantly allowing for new discoveries even with day-to-day use.
  • Design concept: Shinagawa Sunny Gardens
    We will create a bright, open ekinaka space that offers a comfortable time and features environmental design that uses sunlight and vegetation.
  • Development details
    • In the prepared foods and Japanese and Western sweets, we will focus on ingredients and preparation, and offer many seasonal products that allow customers to experience the changing of the seasons.
    • At the NEWDAYS convenience stores, we will offer a new kind of convenience store that combines the offerings of a drugstore, with a product lineup designed with an eye towards beauty and health.
    • In order to capture those customers coming for restaurants or cafes, we will open multiple unique shops. We will develop eateries that provide authentic menus at a quick pace, as well as cafe-bars that offer unique menus for each of five specific periods a day.
    • In the accessories zone, we will offer original products that can’t be purchased elsewhere and products that combine functionality with design.


Current and after renovation



Current and after renovation

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:22 AM   #1678
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JR East may take over Seibu Yūrakuchō space
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1438013-n1.htm

Quote:
On September 8, it was revealed that JR East subsidiary and fashion building manager LUMINE (HQ: Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō) is the likely candidate to inherit the space currently occupied by Seibu Department Stores’ Yūrakuchō store (Chiyoda Ward, Tōkyō), which will close its doors at the end of December. Negotiations are underway with building property owner The Asahi Shimbun Company, and if LUMINE is selected, this will be JR East’s first major facility venture outside of station tenant buildings.

LUMINE operates retail facilities which feature a collection of specialty retail shops specializing in clothing, accessories, and other items, primarily in JR East station tenant buildings. Starting with the Shinjuku store inside a station tenant building at JR Shinjuku Station, Lumine now has 14 locations.

Seibu Department Stores’ Yūrakuchō store currently operates inside Yūrakuchō Marion, also home to a movie theater and Hankyū Department Stores. Partly because of the excellent location, the store has a strong customer attraction potential. LUMINE is looking to make an entry and expand its business in the Ginza / Yūrakuchō area, an epicenter for fashion.

Amidst expectations of stalled growth in railway revenues due to population aging, JR East has been strengthening its distribution business, including buying out gourmet supermarket Kinokuniya in April of this year.

However, given that the rents are high, the fact that discussions with LUMINE are proceeding favorably may only be a temporary situation. Asahi Shimbun’s public relations department says, “It hasn’t been finalized yet, so we cannot comment.”
Original article:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=817
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:24 AM   #1679
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JR Shimbashi Station improvements to break ground in November
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20100901.pdf

Quote:
At Shimbashi Station on the Tōkaidō Line, we will begin improvement works for barrier-free upgrades, seismic reinforcement, and congestion relief inside the station in November.

Details of station improvement works
Shimbashi Station serves a daily average ridership of approx. 250,000 passengers and is served by the Tōkaidō Line, Yamanote Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and Yokosuka Line.

However, barrier-free upgrades and seismic reinforcement are incomplete, and the narrow, confined concourse is split north and south, resulting in major congestion. As a result, we will now begin improvement works.
  • Barrier-free installation upgrades
    We will install elevators on each of the Tōkaidō Line (one island platform), Yamanote Line / Keihin-Tōhoku Line (two island platforms), and Yokosuka Line (one island platform). In addition, we will install elevators connecting the ground-level concourse and underground concourse.
  • Seismic reinforcement
    We will conduct seismic reinforcement of the Tōkaidō Line’s steel-reinforced concrete viaduct, as well as reinforcement and replacement of the Yamanote Line / Keihin-Tōhoku Line brick arch viaduct.
  • Congestion relief inside the station
    We will change the station’s interior layout and combine the north and south concourses as one, alleviating congestion inside the station.
Upcoming schedule
In regards to the barrier-free installations, we will complete construction of all escalators by FY2016.

For the seismic reinforcement work, we will complete seismic reinforcement on the Tōkaidō Line by FY2013, and afterwards begin seismic reinforcement on the Yamanote Line / Keihin-Tōhoku Line.

In regards to the congestion relief inside the station, after aiming for temporary completion of the combined north-south concourse in FY2013, we will then work on expanding the concourse.

Other
We apologize for any inconvenience to passengers during the station improvement works and ask for your understanding and cooperation during this period.
Existing:


Source: JR East

Future:


Source: JR East
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:27 AM   #1680
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JR Central plans to select Shinagawa as terminal for Chūō Shinkansen maglev
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0933000-n1.htm

Quote:
On August 8, it was revealed that JR Central has decided on a plan to have JR Shinagawa Station serve as the terminus for the Chūō Shinkansen maglev scheduled to open between Tōkyō and Nagoya in 2027. Spokespersons for the railway say they have already notified the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and JR East of their plan. It’s believed Shinagawa Station was selected because of soil tests of underground layers where the line will be constructed and because of its accessibility to and from Haneda Airport.

Tōkyō Station, Tōkyō’s major terminal, was also a favored candidate, but the area below the station is a web of Shinkansen lines, conventional train lines, and subway lines, likely making it difficult to construct a massive new maglev station. It’s likely that transferring to the maglev from areas in eastern Japan will be an inconvenient process.

The terminal station will likely be constructed by digging out a space approx. 1 km long located several tens of meters belowground. The design will allow for expedient connections with Shinagawa Station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen—a likely benefit when the maglev is out of service and passengers need to move between stations smoothly.

In regards to Tōkyō Station, JR Central has no plans to conduct soil tests at all, and the probability of Shinagawa Station being selected without much fuss is high.

The Chūō Shinkansen maglev would connect Tōkyō and Nagoya in approx. 40 minutes, and construction costs for this section are approx. ¥5.1 trillion. The section between Tōkyō and Ōsaka is planned to open in 2045.
Not unexpected, since Shinagawa seemed to be the favorite if I recall. The remaining question is what this means, if anything, for the rest of the train network in Tōkyō.
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