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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:28 AM   #1681
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Liaison group established for Ryōmō Line – Isesaki Line through-service proposal
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/gun...OYT8T00103.htm

Quote:
With the aim of implementing through-service of the Tōbu Isesaki Line connecting Isesaki and Tōkyō’s Asakusa district onto the JR Ryōmō Line, Gunma Prefecture and three local jurisdictions along the Ryōmō Line—Maebashi City, Isesaki City, and Kiryū City—established the Liaison Group for Revitalization of the JR Ryōmō Line on September 3. The goal is to take the long-standing proposal for through-service, which has yet to see success, and rework it through consideration of the current transportation policies and local circumstances. The hope is to develop a highly-realistic plan and lobby JR and Tōbu Railway to implement the project.

Through-service between the Ryōmō Line and Isesaki Line will be possible as part of ongoing construction at Isesaki Station. The Isesaki Line continues all the way to shitamachi districts in Tōkyō, and outside Oshiage Station on the line, construction is underway on the Tōkyō Sky Tree (Sumida Ward, Tōkyō). If Gunma Prefecture and popular visitor spots can be linked together via a one-seat ride on the train, it’s likely that areas along the Ryōmō Line will be able to attract a new wave of visitors. By improving convenience for residents and increasing railway users, it’s also hoped that urban neighborhoods focused around train stations can be revitalized.

Proposals for through-service along the Ryōmō Line have been suggested in the past. In 1958, the Association for Improvements to the Ryōmō Line—composed of local jurisdictions in Gunma and Tochigi Prefectures and with the mayor of Kiryū City as chairman—identified it as a pending question to resolve. In 1980, the Promotional Council for Tōbu Train Through-Service onto the Ryōmō Line was formed with the mayor of Maebashi City as chairman, but the council was disbanded in March 2009.

The reason behind the repeated “ebb and flow” of the proposal has to do with the “soft” and “hard” elements of the project.

There are many uncertainties in the project, such as whether or not a sufficient number of riders can be expected to take the train in Gunma Prefecture, which is largely a car-based environment. Both the Ryōmō Line and Isesaki Line have a complex mix of multiple- and single-track sections, meaning capacity is not constant across various sections of the lines and making train headway scheduling a difficult task.

On the other hand, in FY2008 Gunma Prefecture established the Prefectural Rail Network Revitalization Research Group composed of experts, and compiled recommendations. Among them, the question of through-servicing was specifically identified as a critical element in constructing a seamless and highly-integrated rail network. The liaison group will rework the proposal based on these recommendations.

Spokespersons for Gunma Prefecture’s Transport Policy Section say, “Now is the time. First, we will be looking at it from the viewpoint of very convenient train stations and urban planning.” In addition, in preparation for next year’s ordinary session of the Diet, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) is considering a “Basic Act on Transportation” that focuses on support for public transport modes, and the Prefectural Transport Policy Section is optimistic, saying that “now is a good chance to rework the proposal.”
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:34 AM   #1682
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Imperial platform at Harajuku Station: Nine years in sleeping
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...008300426.html

Quote:
North of Harajuku Station on the JR Yamanote Line in Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō is a small station with a yellow-green roof—the “Imperial platform,” a station for the exclusive use of the Imperial House of Japan. During His Majesty the Emperor’s convalescence, Imperial trains stopped here, but the platform hasn’t been used for over nine years. The gate doors at the entrance, surrounded by clean white walls, remain closed.

Approx. 200 m away from Harajuku Station’s Takeshita Exit towards Yoyogi is the entrance to the Imperial platform. Fenced off from the surroundings, the entrance isn’t easily spotted.

According to JR East, the platform was completed in October 1925 (Taishō 14). It’s said the platform was constructed to allow the gravely ill Emperor Taishō to discreetly use the trains when traveling. The following year, 1926, Emperor Taishō used the platform for the first time for a trip to the Hayama Imperial Villa in Kanagawa Prefecture.

The specifications for the platform and facilities are “confidential,” but according to Hoshiyama Kazuo’s A Century of Imperial Trains (Railway Book Publication Society), the distance from the porte-cochère to trains stopped at the platform is ten meters. The platforms are over 100 m long—shorter than the platforms at Harajuku Station and other stations.

During Emperor Shōwa’s reign, the platforms were in frequent use for trips to the Nasu Imperial Villa (Nasu Town, Tochigi Prefecture) and Suzaki Imperial Villa (Shimoda City, Shizuoka Prefecture) and when visiting the rural areas. According to JR East, the platform has been used a total of 30 times after the birth of JR in 1987, and twelve times by Empress Kōjun alone.

When His Majesty the Emperor ascended to his position, however, opportunities to use the platform have dropped, and they haven’t been used since May 2001.

Now, when traveling to Nasu Imperial Villa, the Imperial House uses the Shinkansen from Tōkyō Station. When traveling to Hayama Imperial Villa, the trip is by car, from the Imperial Palace. Officials in the Imperial Household Agency say, “When His Majesty needs a rest, I think he prefers traveling like everyone else instead of going out of his way to use the Imperial platform and making a big deal of it.”

Part of the reason for the drop in usage of the special platform may be a crowded train schedule that covers multiple lines.

The platform serves a track siding connected to a freight line running parallel to the Yamanote Line. According to JR East, in addition to Saikyō Line trains running on the freight line, the number of trains has increased since December 2001 as a result of the start of operations of the Shōnan-Shinjuku Line, making “use of the platform difficult.”

Representatives of JR East, which is responsible for maintaining and managing the platform, say the extent of the railway’s duties nowadays are limited to regular weed maintenance. As the track switch is not in use, the bulbs on the track signals are covered up. The rails are also rusted, making impromptu use of the platform difficult.

When asked whether the platform would ever see a return to use, officials in the Imperial Household Agency remarked, “I think there’s a chance we might use it when there is reasonable justification for event purposes, such as when accompanying guests of state on tours outside Tōkyō.”

Even operations of Imperial trains have become less frequent. During the reign of Emperor Shōwa, there were several Imperial train movements every year, but since the beginning of the Heisei Era, there have only been seven Imperial train movements across a period of 21 years. The reason is that the Imperial House now uses the Shinkansen and regularly-scheduled train services more frequently.

The last time an Imperial train bearing the Japanese flag and chrysanthemum seal of the Imperial House of Japan was operated was in November 2008, when the Emperor and Empress accompanied the King of Spain to Tsukuba City in Ibaraki Prefecture. The event marked the debut of the latest Imperial train manufactured by JR East in 2007—the E655 series—and the first Imperial train movement in about six and a half years, and many railfans gathered along the line, cameras in hand.

The new train features a special car used exclusively for members of the Imperial House known as the “Imperial car,” together with five additional premium-grade cars. These five cars form the luxury train for public use known as the Nagomi train.

The special Imperial car, however, has only been used once, on the visit to Tsukuba in 2008. On the trip to Suzaki Imperial Villa in April of this year, the five-car Nagomi set was put into use again after a long rest on a journey all the way to Itō Station. As the purpose of the trip was for convalescence, however, the special Imperial car was not coupled into the train, and the chrysanthemum crest of the Imperial House was also omitted.

In the midst of this news, an Imperial train featuring the Imperial car is scheduled to make its first journey in about two years in late September. The Emperor and Empress will be visiting Chiba Prefecture to attend the National Sports Festival of Japan, and will be riding on the train when traveling along the Bōsō Peninsula on official business. According to the Imperial Household Agency, because the travel distances are substantial, the Imperial family will be using the Imperial train instead of automobiles.
Imperial platform:

image hosted on flickr

Source: ykanazawa1999 on Flickr

Pictures of the most recent Imperial train movement on the Tsukuba Express (2010.08.02):
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ryomo251f/

Hard to see the departure display, but it says tsūka (“won’t stop”) for the Imperial train.



Imperial train approaching Yashio Station. The destination display is marked at dantai (“reserved” or “(group) charter”).



Returning back to Moriya Yard after Imperial train duties.



Not exactly the Imperial seal…

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:38 AM   #1683
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Tsukuba Express celebrates 5th anniversary: Tōkyō Station extension still uncertain
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/kant...0301004-n1.htm

Quote:
On August 24, the Tsukuba Express (TX) linking Akihabara in Tōkyō with Tsukuba City celebrated its fifth anniversary. With a growing population along the rail line and the debut of large-scale retail facilities, average daily ridership for FY2009 topped 270,000 passengers, beating the original target set by TX operator Metropolitan Intercity Railway (MIR) of FY2010 by one year. As a result, local jurisdictions are anxious about the possibility of extending the line to Tōkyō Station. MIR president Takahashi Nobukazu has expressed an optimistic stance on extension of the line to Tōkyō Station, but has yet to make reference to a specific timeline for it, and the fate of the project is still uncertain.

TX ridership has been increasing steadily ever since the opening. Starting with 150,000 daily passengers in the opening year of FY2005, average daily ridership has been increasing: 195,000 passengers (30 percent increase) in FY2006; 234,000 passengers (20 percent increase) in FY2007; 258,000 passengers (10 percent increase) in FY2008; and 270,000 passengers in FY2009.

In FY2010, the line continues to see ridership growth, reaching 293,000 passengers daily in May—the first time the line has surpassed 290,000 passengers daily.

An average daily ridership of 270,000 passengers has been regarded as a prerequisite to extending the TX beyond Akihabara to Tōkyō Station, and Ibaraki Prefecture municipalities along the line including Tsukuba City, Tsukuba Mirai City, and Moriya City are beginning to gain hope for the extension.

In regards to future capacity improvements, MIR president Takahashi showed an optimistic outlook at an August 25 press conference at Akihabara Station: “We are currently considering conversion of six-car trains to eight-car trains. The Urban Transport Council has also identified the Tōkyō Station extension as a ‘candidate project,’ and I hope we can work to get approval from the concerned agencies and begin serious consideration of the project.”

In regards to timeline, however, Takahashi was less forthcoming, failing to identify a specific schedule: “The Tōkyō Station extension will involve a lot of construction. It would be wonderful if we could time it with the conversion to eight-car trains.”

North-south gap
With the opening of the TX, the “gap” between northern and southern Ibaraki Prefecture has only become larger. The total population of Ibaraki Prefecture is continuing to drop, primarily in the northern regions of the prefecture, but there is a clear trend of population growth in the three cities along the TX. Compared to before the opening of the line, the population increased by 1,745 residents (7.4 percent) in Tsukuba City, 3,889 residents (9.7 percent) in Tsukuba Mirai City, and 8,333 residents (15.5 percent) in Moriya City.

Higher-end condominiums and large-scale retail facilities have hit the market surrounding Moriya Station and Kenkyū Gakuen Station (Tsukuba City), and the town scenery isn’t what it used to be. On the other hand, some condominium buildings sit largely empty and some areas along the line have yet to see trackside development takeoff, magnifying the contrast between “light and shadow” created by the opening of the TX.

On August 24, MIR operated its traditional “Childrens’ Art Train” between Akihabara and Tsukuba.

The interior of the train displays artwork by children based on the theme of the TX. In honor of this year as the fifth anniversary of the line, TX mascot Spiffy and mascots from the three prefectures along the line including Hussle Kōmon were on board the train. Inside the train, children artists and their families took pictures of their artwork to commemorate the event.

The 1,760 artwork pieces received will be on display until September 5 inside trains and at Shin-Okachimachi, Yashio, and Nagareyama Central Park Stations.
Tōkyō MX news report (2010.08.24):



Cab view on a rapid train from Tsukuba to Akihabara:
Source: SuperExpress1 on YouTube

Part 1: Tsukuba to Moriya



Part 2: Moriya to Minami-Nagareyama



Part 3: Minami-Nagareyama to Kita-Senju



Part 4: Kita-Senju to Akihabara

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:41 AM   #1684
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Population around Miraidaira Station breaks 5,000
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/ib...602000066.html

Quote:
Local residents fight; community grows one step at a time
Days before the fifth anniversary of the opening of the Tsukuba Express (TX), the residential population in the Miraidaira district of Tsukuba Mirai City topped 5,000. Thanks to Miraidaira Station on the TX, the district is within Tōkyō’s commuting sphere, and about 60 percent of the residents are transplants from outside Ibaraki Prefecture, including Tōkyō Prefecture. The district is also contributing to social fluctuations as some Ibaraki Prefecture residents move in and others move out. As the basic infrastructure of the neighborhood is being built with the opening of retail facilities and police boxes, the number of new residents participating in local activities is increasing, and the town is making progress one step at a time.

The 5,000th resident of the area is Ishihata Uika, born on July 29. In September, Mayor Kataba Masao is scheduled to present a special commemorative award to Uika and celebrate breaking 5,000 residents.

After the TX opened, large-scale supermarkets, restaurants, and clinics have been built, and a police box has opened. In 2007, sumō stable Tatsunami-beya also relocated from Tōkyō’s Ryōgoku district. Sumō wrestlers participate in local events and take an active role in cultural exchange with the local residents. Now, the stable has settled into the neighborhood and is gradually becoming a popular spot in a new townscape.

Takeuchi Mitsuharu (67), neighborhood council chairman for Yōkōdai (Miraidaira district), Tsukuba Mirai City, publishes a council newsletter monthly that introduces local news. In cooperation with residents in the neighborhood council, Takeuchi is devoting impressive efforts to local activities, including evening neighborhood patrols and street cleaning. “I hope to build a neighborhood where we take it upon ourselves to protect what we have,” says a determined Takeuchi.

The age group for heads of household in the district are primarily between 40 and 49, but range anywhere from the 30s to the 70s. And it appears that a local bond is slowly developing. “Sometimes younger mothers will come for help, saying that their children have caught a fever… When the storm shutters on my windows are sealed, people come asking to make sure I’m not sick. Neighbors here care and will talk to you,” says Takeuchi.

The Miraidaira district is one of the development zones along the TX being orchestrated by the Prefectural Government, and stretches across a total land area of 275 ha. Land readjustment for the district is about 80 percent complete. The influx of new residents continues, focusing on detached homes and the 18-story condominium tower outside the station, and the city’s population grew by approx. 4,000 people, most of whom moved into the Miraidaira district.

The Miraidaira district is aiming for a future population of 16,000 (5,000 homes). Breaking 5,000 residents is but one milestone on that path, and the community-building process among new residents has only just begun.
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:42 AM   #1685
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Farewell to Shin-Keisei 800 series

Original news item is here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1357

Last day of regular revenue service was July 16. Farewell runs were July 24-25.

Some last shots in revenue service. By then, these units were mostly being used for rush-hour service.


Source: ayokoi on YouTube

Farewell runs:


Source: krfj8000 on YouTube

Back to the barn, one last time.
Open-air window view from Kunugiyama Station to Kunugiyama Yard.


Source: sugishimashin on YouTube
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:45 AM   #1686
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Saitama City to request relaxation of grant money requirements for Saitama Railway extension to Iwatsuki
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/sa...002000068.html

Quote:
In the Subway Line 7 Extension Project which would extend subway service from Urawa Misono Station (Saitama Railway) to Iwatsuki Station (Tōbu Noda Line) in Saitama City, on August 20 Saitama City will make a request to the national government that the repayment period for construction loans—a prerequiste in receiving grant awards from the national government—be relaxed from the current 30 years to 40 years. Saitama City is aiming to break ground on the project before FY2012, but as the financial projections for the line indicate that the loans cannot be paid off in thirty years, the national government’s approval or refusal to relax the prerequisites is likely to be the deciding factor in whether the extension moves forward or not.

Saitama City is requesting a relaxation of requirements in the Act on Enhancement of Convenience of Urban Railways, which distributes grant money from the national government. The estimated total construction cost of the extension from Urawa Misono to Iwatsuki is approx. ¥75 billion, but the city aiming to win grant money for the project under the special law, which would then split costs three ways (approx. ¥25 billion each) between the national government, the prefectural and municipal governments, and the construction lead.

However, application of the special law requires that the railway operator for the line extension be able to repay the construction lead’s share of ¥25 billion in 30 years.

In order to improve the financial feasibility of the line, the city has been considering the possibility of constructing an additional intermediate station between Iwatsuki Station and Saitama Stadium Station (provisional name), a new station to be established with the extension. The city is conducting ridership demand studies as part of an effort to look at the potential for increasing ridership through residential development and promotion campaigns to attract facilities such as universities or corporations surrounding the intermediate station. However, the promotion efforts are making little progress, and city administrators say that a thirty-year repayment schedule is “difficult.”

As a result, at a general session of the Citizens’ Working Group for Realizing the Extension held July 25 in Iwatsuki Ward, Mayor Shimizu Hayato announced his plan to request that the national government relax the repayment period requirements while still allowing the project to receive the grant money. Mayor Shimizu has made a groundbreaking on the extension of Subway Line 7 by FY2012 a campaign promise.

On August 20, the mayor will submit the petition to the national government through the prefectural chapter of the Democratic Party of Japan. The petition also contains requests from previous petitions to increase the national government’s funding share, but the national government has yet to approve an increased share. One city councilmember has said, “If the relaxation of the repayment period requirements is not approved, a groundbreaking by FY2012 is uncertain.”

Subway Line 7
The general name for the Tōkyō Metro Namboku Line and Saitama Railway. In 2000, the national government’s Transport Policy Council identified that the line should be extended “to Hasuda Station, with opening by FY2015.” Later in 2002, Saitama Prefecture decided on a plan to designate the 7.3 km section from Urawa Misono Station to Iwatsuki Station as the first phase of the project. In regards to the line, eight cities and towns including Hasuda City formed a lobby group in 1969 and are continuing their efforts, calling for extension of the line to Hanyū City. If Subway Line 7 is extended to Iwatsuki Station, journey times from Iwatsuki Station to Roppongi in Tōkyō will be reduced by approx. 15 minutes from the existing route via Ōmiya Station to approx. 50 minutes.
Map of extension (in red). Solid red is the first phase from Urawa Misono to Iwatsuki, dashed red is phase 2 from Iwatsuki to Hasuda.


Source: Saitama Prefecture

There are also some preliminary studies done by Saitama Prefecture of how the extension would work. Some of the more interesting ones (Japanese only):
  • 東武野田線との相互直通運転の検討 (Considerations for Mutual Through-Service with Tōbu Noda Line): Identifies technological requirements for through-service, basic design considerations, and possible layout for Iwatsuki Station
  • 埼玉スタジアム駅の検討 (Considerations for Saitama Stadium Station): Considers basic and event service plan for extension, as well as passenger flows and station design (faregates, etc.)
  • 利便性を考慮したスタジアム駅の形態 (Design of Saitama Stadium Station for Convenience): Evaluates specific station layouts and the resulting access convenience to / from the stadium
  • 追越し施設の効果等の検証 (Evaluation of Effects of Passing Tracks): Looks at benefits of passing tracks and limited-stop service, as well as necessary scheduling requirements and candidate stations for limited-stop service

Also, some insightful little tours of Saitama Railway (SR) stations and the surrounding neighborhoods. Apparently the filmmaker intended this for real estate purposes, but they’re perfect for seeing what each of the areas is like:
Source: akira9020 on YouTube

Kawaguchi – Motogō Station



Minami-Hatogaya Station:



Hatogaya Station:



Araijuku Station:



Tozuka – Angyō Station:



Higashi-Kawaguchi Station:



Urawa Misono Station

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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:49 AM   #1687
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New concourse and exit at Akasaka Mitsuke Station
http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2010/2010-43.html

Quote:
At Tōkyō Metro (HQ: Taitō Ward, Tōkyō; President: Umezaki Hisashi), we have been undertaking large-scale improvement works at Akasaka-Mitsuke Station on the Ginza Line and Marunouchi Line, and on August 28, 2010, we will open a new station concourse and exit serving Akasaka’s Sannōshita area, which was previously without a station exit.

As part of the construction, we built a new interior space across approx. 530 sq m three levels belowground—lower than the Ginza Line and Marunouchi Line platforms at the station—and constructed a new ticketing entrance and station exit, as well as a station concourse complete with restrooms and waiting space. As a result, it will now become extremely convenient for customers using Akasaka-Mitsuke Station who are coming from the Sannōshita area of Akasaka, which previously lacked a ticketing entrance and station exit.

In addition, as part of this construction, we have moved forward with implementation of emergency exit guidance installations and smoke disperal installations, improving the safety of the station.

As for the platforms and existing ticketing entrances at the station, we are currently underway on renovation works, scheduled for completion in spring 2011.

At Tōkyō Metro, we are committed to continuing efforts to create even more convenient, even more pleasant, and even safer station environment for our passengers.


New station exit

A more convenient, more pleasant station
  • Concourse design
    • A design that draws from the office buildings surrounding the new exit, as well as the lush greenery and serenity of Hie Shrine.
    • The first walls after exiting the faregates feature backlighting, making it easier to perceive the rise to surface level.
    • The placement of items concentrates information boards and directional signage for high ease of use.

    New concourse
  • New ticketing entrance and station exit
    • Improves access to Akasaka-Mitsuke Station from Akasaka’s Sannōshita area (the side closer to Tameike – Sannō Station and Kokkai Gijidō-mae Station), which has lacked a ticketing entrance and station exit until now.

    Exiting ticketing entrance and station exit in blue, new ticketing entrance and station exit in red
  • New restrooms
    • In response to a wide array of customer needs, we’ve incorporated the following furnishings to allow convenient use of the restrooms by all our customers:
      • Installation of a large single-stall toilet that allows users to enter with a baby stroller (men’s and women’s restrooms).
      • Installation of a large wash space and a separate powder corner (women’s restroom).
      • Installation of large, full-length mirrors and a “dressing space” separate from the wash space (men’s restroom).
      • Installation of baby seats and fitting boards (men’s and women’s restrooms, multi-functional toilets).
      • Large spaces capable of handling passengers in wheelchairs and featuring automatic doors (multi-functional toilets).

    Powder corner, women’s restroom (left); wash space, women’s restroom (center); waiting space (right)
  • Installation of waiting space
    • We’ve installed 15 seats inside the paid area for use as waiting space.
  • Barrier-free installations
    • We’ve installed up and down escalators next to the stairwell at the station exit.
    • We’ve installed new elevators connecting the ticketing level with the various station platform levels.
  • Environmental considerations
    • We’ve introduced high-efficiency inverter-type units into the station’s interior lighting.

A safer station
At Tōkyō Metro, we have been making efforts to improve safety against highly-volatile fires through the use of various equipment, in accordance with the revised fire prevention standards following the subway fire in Korea’s Daegu City in February 2003. With the latest large-scale improvement works at the station, we have completed the fire prevention installations at Akasaka-Mitsuke Station.
  • Emergency exit guidance installations
    In stations with only a single escape route from platform level to surface level, we have constructed a new escape route, securing escape routes in two directions and allowing passengers to safely escape from platform level to surface level.
  • Smoke dispersal installations
    We are introducing installations at all of our stations in accordance with the new standards.

Tōkyō Metro’s Networkwide Improvements
With the goal of alleviating station congestion and improving convenience, we are widening platforms and concourses, installing new station exits, and implementing upgrade works together with civil construction works.

With the latest large-scale improvement works at Akasaka-Mitsuke Station, we have conducted upgrades especially designed to improve passenger convenience and strengthen fire prevention installations.

Scheduled upcoming large-scale station improvement works:
  • Nakano-Sakaue Station, Marunouchi Line: Construction of a new ticketing entrance and station exit for fire prevention; barrier-free improvements
  • Toyosu Station, Yūrakuchō Line: Construction of a new ticketing entrance to relieve congestion; additional barrier-free installations
  • Monzen-Nakachō Station, Tōzai Line: Widening of a portion of platforms to improve convenience of transfers; barrier-free improvements
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:51 AM   #1688
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Schedule announced for next set of Yūrakuchō Line platform doors
http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2010/2010-45.html

Quote:
At Tōkyō Metro (HQ: Taitō Ward, Tōkyō; President: Umezaki Hisashi), we have been advancing forward with installation of platform doors as a safety measure (against platform falls and accidental train contact), in order to ensure a comfortable experience for our customers. In the program to introduce platform doors to all stations on the Yūrakuchō Line (scheduled completion in FY2012), we have recently decided on the installation date and start-of-service date for platform doors on the four stations starting from Kanamechō Station to Gokokuji Station.

At the four stations to receive platform door installations in this set, we will begin operation of the doors after erection of the units on the platform and completion of tests. The installation and start-of-service schedule are detailed below.

Yūrakuchō Line platform doors
The platform doors to be installed on the Yūrakuchō Line are half-height doors similar to those already introduced onto the Marunouchi Line and Fukutoshin Line, but featuring a new transparent toughened-glass section through the door leaves. As a result, passengers can ascertain the gap between platform and train even when the platform doors are sealed. The glass sections also increase the field of vision, improving the openness of the platform.

In addition, at locations on curved platform sections where the gap between train and platform is large, we have installed moving steps (gap fillers), further improving safety.

At Tōkyō Metro, we are installing platform doors at all stations on the Yūrakuchō Line, aiming for completion in FY2012. We apologize for any inconvenience during the construction period, and ask for your understanding.

Yūrakuchō Line platform door start-of-service schedule
Installation date and start-of-service date may change.
  • Y-02: Chikatetsu Narimasu
    Installation complete
    Start of service: October 16, 2010
  • Y-03: Chikatetsu Akatsuka
    Installation complete
    Start of service: September 25, 2010
  • Y-04: Heiwadai
    Installation complete
    Start of service: September 11, 2010
  • Y-05: Hikawadai
    In service
  • Y-06: Kotake – Mukaihara
    In service
  • Y-07: Senkawa
    Installation timeline currently under adjustment due to conflict with the Senkawa Station to Kotake – Mukaihara Station Connecting Track Installation Project
  • Y-08: Kanamechō
    Installation date: September 25, 2010 (Shin-Kiba platform) and October 2, 2010 (Wakō-shi platform)
    Start of service: January 8, 2011
  • Y-09: Ikebukuro
    Installation date: October 23, 2010 (Shin-Kiba platform) and October 30, 2010 (Wakō-shi platform)
    Start of service: January 22, 2011
  • Y-10: Higashi-Ikebukuro
    Installation date: November 20, 2010 (Shin-Kiba platform) and November 27, 2010 (Wakō-shi platform)
    Start of service: February 26, 2011
  • Y-11: Gokokuji
    Installation date: December 11, 2010 (Shin-Kiba platform) and December 18, 2010 (Wakō-shi platform)
    Start of service: March 26, 2011
Note:
“Installation date” refers to the day platform door pockets are erected on the platform.
“Start-of-service date” refers to the day platform doors begin operation.
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Old September 15th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #1689
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Tōkyō Metro 16000 series for Chiyoda Line makes press debut

New trainsets for the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line, similar to the 10000 series (Yūrakuchō Line, Fukutoshin Line) and 15000 series (Tōzai Line), to replace the 6000 series currently in operation. Ten-car trains (4M6T) featuring permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) which consume about 10% less electricity than the induction motors used in 10000 series.

Car body is double-skin and features reinforced columns at the four corners of each car for structural strength and vibration reductions, improving ride comfort and decreasing ambient noise. The order is for a total of 16 trains, 160 cars.
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

First train, Yoyogi Uehara end car, at Ayase Yard.



Like the 10000 series, the placement of emergency exit door is straight down the center. Headlights are HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps, taillights are LED.



Interior of Car No. 8. Interior is a stylish and clean two-tone navy blue and white. The usually solid and opaque partitions at the end of the longitudinal seating sets feature translucent (looks almost frosted, but that could just be the reflection of the white interior) toughened glass. Roof has been redesigned to increase space in the overhead racks.



Wheelchair space in the Yoyogi Uehara end of Car No. 9. The moquette for priority seating is light blue to distinguish it from regular seating but still in keeping with the blue motif throughout the rest of the car. Like the 10000 series, the car ends use large tempered glass sections.



Door lintels feature double 17 in wide LCD screens and just below, a warning light for passengers to indicate opening or closing doors.



More toughened glass, this time forming the base of the overhead racks.



Cabin. Left-side display is speedometer and related information. Right-side display is train information. The 16000 series is Tōkyō Metro’s first train to feature Mitsubishi Electric’s TIS (Train-control Information Management System) for brake control. Four-notch master controller, seven-notch service brake.

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Old September 17th, 2010, 11:15 PM   #1690
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Tsukuba Express celebrates 5th anniversary: Tōkyō Station extension still uncertain
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/kant...0301004-n1.htm
Quite impressive for a line with just 100mln annual ridership. Almost all elevated with long underground parts. I suppose there 100m long stations? How much did it cost to build back then?
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Old September 18th, 2010, 04:48 AM   #1691
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coth View Post
Almost all elevated with long underground parts.
I don't have any official numbers off-hand right now, but according to this source, the composition of the line is as follows:
  • 16.3 km (28%) tunnels
  • 25.5 km (44%) elevated viaduct
  • 10.2 km (17%) bridges
  • 6.3 km (11%) cut
Quote:
Originally Posted by coth View Post
I suppose there 100m long stations
All trains are six cars (120 m) long, and they are in the process of designing platform extensions to allow for eight-car trains, although they haven’t started construction yet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coth View Post
How much did it cost to build back then?
Construction cost was ¥830 billion. They are recouping at least some of the investment through trackside development.
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Old September 24th, 2010, 08:31 AM   #1692
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wow... fantastic
Very interesting project.
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:34 AM   #1693
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Outside of the regular news updates, a series of photo posts to celebrate the final days of summer...

Nishitetsu
2000 series
These will be retired soon.


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Newest rolling stock, 3000 series


Source: 筑後川鉄橋 on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

JR Kyūshū
Nagasaki Station from Mount Inasa


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Hiroshima Electric Railway
#582. Built 1924 (Taishō 13). The last remaining of its class still in service, but the cab of one remains in service for training operators, while another car was donated to San Francisco for heritage trolley service (currently not operating).


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Skyrail Midorizaka Line
Special people-mover / gondola in Hiroshima City.


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Iyo Railway
Ōtemachi crossing (train and tram)


Source: ルンルン♪ on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:36 AM   #1694
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JR West
225-5000 series in testing


Source: おはんきゅう on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

JR Nara Station, New station building


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Old station building, preserved


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:37 AM   #1695
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Ōsaka Municipal Subway
Midōsuji Line


Source: 名無しのへたれ職人◆4PqRaNcRjA on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Semboku Rapid Railway


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: 百舌鳥の中 on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Nankai
rapi:t


Source: NZ2258◆95HWRNwQt. on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Nose Electric Railway
1700 series (ex-Hankyū 2000 series), 50 years in service.


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Hankyū
Awaji Station


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Keihan
Keishin Line


Source: 鮫故ヒ素 on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:38 AM   #1696
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Kintetsu
Ōsaka Line


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Tawaramoto Line


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Yamato Saidaiji Station


Source: 旭区SF◆hRjkAF3M6M on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:39 AM   #1697
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Toyama Chihō Railroad
“Green Tram”: Powered using purchased electricity generated by about 200 homes equipped with solar panels.


Source: 岡高◆90e/N2bs3w on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: 岡高◆90e/N2bs3w on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Meitetsu
Meitetsu Nagoya Station. The colored backlit panels above the platform indicate door locations


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

JR Central
313-1000 series


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Nagano Electric Railway
Ex-Eidan 3000 series (Hibiya Line) on the Nagano Electric Railway
These were nicknamed “Sperm Whales”.


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:40 AM   #1698
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JR East

MUE-Train (retired train converted into a test train for experimental technologies)


Source: makoko on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Long-distance special charter run of E231 series train typically used for commuter runs on Tōkaidō Main Line in Tōkyō area. Journey was all the way out to Hamamatsu, two-thirds of the way to Nagoya.


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Near Yokohama Station


Source: ツルの番人◆dbRXKnfjAg on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Sagami Line, between Hashimoto and Minami-Hashimoto


Source: Mbk◆KShIwW3m9A on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Komagawa Station: Diesel and electric EMUs on the Hachikō Line.


Source: Mbk◆KShIwW3m9A on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

115 series in Yokosuka colors on the Chūō Line between Hachiōji and Nishi-Hachiōji


Source: じゅん◆dySDvrEnOM on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Chūō Line rapid E233 series


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: 中央線沿線住民 on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

JR East 205 series on the Rinkai Line


Source: Bauhaus◆aEZhW.Xj2g on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Jōban Line E233 series


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:42 AM   #1699
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Odakyū

50000 series (VSE)


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

60000 series (MSE)


Source: 名無しロマンスカー on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

3000 series


Source: じゅん◆dySDvrEnOM on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: 名無しのへたれ職人◆4PqRaNcRjA on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: じゅん◆dySDvrEnOM on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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Old September 25th, 2010, 10:42 AM   #1700
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Tōkyū
Mizonokuchi Station


Source: 名無しのへたれ職人◆4PqRaNcRjA on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/


Source: Mbk◆KShIwW3m9A on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Tōkyū and Tōkyō Metro trains in storage yard


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Keikyū


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Tōkyō Monorail
Haneda Airport International Terminal Station


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Tōbu
Tōbu Spacia limited express and Tōkyū 8500 series commuter train)


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Keisei

Cityliner


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Skyliner


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/

Enoden
Trains in both Enoden and Randen colors


Source: Anonymous on http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/
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