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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:18 AM   #1821
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New stations open at Haneda Airport International Terminal: Part 5

Some videos:

First, a look at the Tōkyō Monorail just a week before the opening of the International Terminal and new station:


Source: karibajct on YouTube

Next, a look at Keikyū a week before the opening:


Source: karibajct on YouTube

kanaloco footage of the new Keikyū station on opening day. Cream Stew make an appearance.



Keikyū platform door operations. Since this is the only station in the network to use platform doors, and due to the sheer variety of equipment (both within Keikyū as well as from other operators, namely Toei, Hokusō, and Keisei), the situation is different than typical cases. The conductor must press a button to open both the train doors and the platform doors (they do not open simultaneously). The result is a few-seconds delay in being able to exit or enter the train. In addition, unlike the Yamanote Line, which has a Train Automatic Stopping Controller (TASC) system, there is no such system here to ensure that trains align properly with the gates, so operators must have good accuracy and precision when stopping the train. Probably, trying to get each operator's trains properly equipped for just this one set of platform doors was not palatable from a cost / feasibility perspective.


Source: karibajct on YouTube

For the station approach melodies, Keikyū selected a famous pop song (SMAP's Sekai ni hitotsu dake no hana) to serve this purpose—an excellent choice, but they should only cycle it twice... Too long.


Source: JETOKIWA1985 on YouTube

Tōkyō Monorail decorated one of their trains with a special flower wrapping.


Source: karibajct on YouTube
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:19 AM   #1822
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Tōkyō Monorail extension to Tōkyō or Shimbashi Stations being investigated
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/na...702000049.html

Quote:
It was revealed in September 16 that Tōkyō Monorail (HQ: Minato Word, Tōkyō; length: 17.8 km), which links Haneda Airport and Hamamatsuchō Station, has begun a serious analysis of whether to extend the line to JR Tōkyō Station or JR Shimbashi Station. With the conversion of Haneda Airport to a 24-hour international hub next month, the railway hopes to improve connections to Narita Airport and strengthen capacity between the two airports.

The limited number of lines serving Hamamatsuchō Station is one factor in the railway’s decision to begin studies. The current terminal at Hamamatsuchō forces passengers traveling by monorail parent company JR East to change trains twice when traveling from Haneda Airport to Narita Airport. As a result, when it comes to convenience, the monorail is at a disadvantage compared to other competing transport modes such as coach buses.

Assuming the monorail were extended to Tōkyō Station, passengers will only need to change trains once, via JR East’s Narita Express. This would lead to significant reductions in journey time and improved competitiveness for the monorail.

Meanwhile, assuming the monorail were extended to Shimbashi Station, it would be possible to have Narita Express trains, which currently skip the station while traveling on the JR Yokosuka Line, serve the station, providing for a transfer connection.

According to preliminary cost estimates by Tōkyō Monorail, the pricetag for a Tōkyō Station extension would be over ¥100 billion, but an extension to Shimbashi Station (excluding station construction) could be completed for one-third of that cost. It’s believed that an extension could be constructed and completed in as quickly as a few years.
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:20 AM   #1823
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Appeals on both sides over Odakyū noise lawsuit
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00745.htm

Quote:
In the lawsuit filed by 118 residents and others living along the Odakyū Line in Tōkyō Prefecture demanding that Odakyū Electric Railway compensate them to a total of approx. ¥780 million as a result of damage to their health from noise, on September 13 the railway appealed to the Tōkyō High Court the August 31 Tōkyō District Court decision ordering it to compensate 42 of the plaintiffs to a total of approx. ¥11 million, saying it was dissatisfied with the judgment.

Spokespersons for the railway said, "The decision identified a specific limit for tolerable noise not based on any clear foundation, and we were forced to conclude that we must bring this to a higher court." Meanwhile, the spokesperson for the plaintiffs, attorney Saitō Takeshi, said, "We are also disappointed with the decision, including the scope of what was deemed necessary for compensation," and announced his plan to file an appeal on September 14.
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:21 AM   #1824
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Odakyū Line photos

Some early morning photos of the Odakyū Odawara Line near Shimo-Kitazawa. This section is currently a mess with all the construction to underground and quadruple-track the tracks. (2010.10.05).
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

Shimo-Kitazawa. Despite the time, commuters are already up and about. Destination board:
5:53 Express for Odawara (10 cars)
6:01 Local for Hon-Atsugi (8 cars)
6:08 Express for Odawara (10 cars)



Up and down, side to side...





At Setagaya Daita. Although there's not so much coverage, this is probably one of the more impressive projects going in Tōkyō, given that they are undergrounding and quadruple-tracking simultaneously, all in extremely tight conditions.



No visible changes near the launch box for the TBM.



Higashi-Kitazawa Station.



Express for Shinjuku.



A 4000 series express for Shinjuku leaving the station. In the distance is the Tōkyō Camii, a mosque and Turkish cultural center.



A through-servicing Tōkyō Metro train, a 6000 series express bound for Matsudo on the JR Jōban Line.



Express for Odawara. On the night of October 8, they apparently switched out this section of track with the new track to the right.

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:22 AM   #1825
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Keiō photos

Some photos of Keiō trains and stations (2010.09.24):
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

7000 series local for Takao-san-guchi approaching Sasazuka. In the background is Takashimaya Times Square in Shinjuku.





Toei 10-000 series, the older of two Toei's two series of trains on the Shinjuku Line.



At Chitose Karasuyama.



Kugayama Station on the Inokashira Line.



Kugayama Station. The station was converted to an elevated concourse type in 2005.



Still looks good as new...



Now at Kichijōji, the terminus of the Inokashira Line. They're also doing some station improvements here, to shorten the walking distance to the faregates (if I remember correctly).



Hop on the JR Chūō Rapid to Musashi Koganei Station. Work still proceeds at the North Exit.

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:22 AM   #1826
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Toden Arakawa Line and Toei Nippori ‒ Toneri Liner photos

Random shots:
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

The entrance at bottom right leads to Minowabashi Station on the Toden Arakawa Line.



May not look like it, but the building on the right is a pair of public restrooms. Much about the Arakawa Line is very retro...



The master controller on the streetcar says it was manufactured in 1962 by Nippon Sharyō.



With the Sky Tree as a backdrop...



And at Kumanomae Station...





A jaunt on the Nippori ‒ Toneri Liner back to Nippori...







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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:23 AM   #1827
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates (Part 1)

A handful of photos of this project to build new track and rehabilitate existing track between Ueno and Tōkyō Stations to bring Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and possibly Jōban Line trains directly into Tōkyō Station. In the past, the three lines had a direct connection to Tōkyō Station, but this was removed when they constructed the Tōhoku Shinkansen, so really, this project is just bringing back and reconnecting those two tracks.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Between Akihabara and Tōkyō. This is the location of the future approach. Because of limited right-of-way, much of the new track will be elevated above the Tōhoku Shinkansen. In order to construct the rest of the approach, they will need to remove the existing infrastructure to the left.



Riding on a southbound Keihin-Tōhoku Line train gives a good impression of just how high the structure needs to get. In the distance is the Tōhoku Shinkansen elevated structure which will now be decked over. Most of the work is concentrated in areas where they currently have the space.



As we pass through Kanda Station, they've clearly done some work to the Shinkansen structure here, and columns and beams are already in place in certain locations. They'll probably continue building the supports for the second level, moving towards Akihabara.



The new approach at the Tōkyō end. This is where the Shinkansen tracks veer left a bit and where the new elevated structure will drop one level to connect with the Tōkaidō Line. These are some pretty large steel beams, jutting far into (but above) the Keihin-Tōhoku Line track. In the distance, high up, is the giant blue crane that lifts the beams into place.



As we approach Tōkyō Station alongside a Shinkansen train, they are working on upgrading and replacing the existing track infrastructure. Looks like the second siding for the Tōkaidō Line has been removed, but one still remains, perhaps the bare minimum to keep service operating efficiently without disruption.

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:24 AM   #1828
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates (Part 2)

For Part 2, we move to Shinagawa Station, where they're doing some track and platform work to allow Tōkaidō Line trains to turn back at this station. There doesn't seem to be a lot of news on this, so the project details are a little bit unclear, but it's definitely for the Tōhoku Through Line, probably to allow Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line trains to turn back at Shinagawa,
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

North end of Platform 10, closer to Tamachi Station. Platform 9 and 10 are part of a single island platform for emergency / irregular use only, and no regular service departs from here. As part of the construction work, they completely removed Track No. 10 several months ago and erected fencing on the platform. They seem to be doing some interesting work here, since it appears they've demolished part of Platform 10, but not all of it.



Down on platform level, this is the scene along the central part of Platform 10. There was originally a through track adjacent to Track No. 10, so the site isn't as constrained as for some other projects. Lots of heavy machinery on site, though, including small crawler cranes and excavators. Currently, these special platforms aren't connected to the outbound track of the Tōkaidō Line, so in order to be able to serve Tōhoku Through Line trains turning back, they'll need a new connection. The track layout is quite complex at Shinagawa, however, and Platforms 11 and 12 currently used by outbound Tōkaidō Line trains actually curve off to the east at the north end. Platforms 9 and 10, however, are parallel to the Yamanote Line tracks and more straight... So perhaps, they will be completely redesigning the platforms to more closely parallel the curves of the outbound track. This could explain some of the strange work going on.



Southern end of Platform 10 closer to Ōimachi. They don't appear to have done much here other than remove the tracks and lay down some wood for machinery access, but perhaps they don't intend to do anything major here other than platform renovation. After all, if they want to bring back the through track between Track No. 10 and Track No. 11, that doesn't leave much space to do anything.



South end, looking from Platform 6.

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:26 AM   #1829
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JR East announces December 2010 service changes
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20100916.pdf

Quote:
At JR East, we will open the Tōhoku Shinkansen extension from Hachinohe to Shin-Aomori on December 4, 2010.

With the opening of Shin-Aomori, travel time from the Greater Tōkyō area to the Aomori area will be greatly reduced, and through improved connections with conventional limited express trains at Shin-Aomori, travel time to the Hirosaki and Hokkaidō areas will also be reduced.

In the Greater Tōkyō area, we will implement service changes to improve the convenience of the Tōkyō Mega Loop and relieve congestion in the evening periods.

...

Improvements to the convenience of the Tōkyō Mega Loop
The Tōkyō Mega Loop refers to JR East's peripheral lines in the Tōkyō area which serve multiple nodes connecting to other railway operators, and consists of the Musashino Line, Keiyō Line, Nambu Line, and Yokohama Line.

New direct-service trains from the Musashino Line to Ōmiya Station
As new direct-service trains connecting Ōmiya Station on the Tōhoku Main Line to the Musashino Line's east (for Nishi-Funabashi) and west (for Hachiōji and Fuchū Honmachi) ends, we will establish the new Shimousa and Musashino services, improving convenience and journey time to Ōmiya Station from along the Musashino Line.

Stopping pattern:



Shimousa (direct-service trains between Musashino Line east end and Ōmiya Station)
Stops at all stations between Musashi Urawa and Kaihin Makuhari.
Code:
Origin           Dep.Time   Arr. Minami-Koshigaya     Dest.           Arr.Time
BOUND FOR: Ōmiya direction
Nishi-Funabashi   06:38      07:13                    Ōmiya            07:38
Shin-Narashino    16:07      16:49                    Ōmiya            17:13
Nishi-Funabashi   19:15      19:48                    Ōmiya            20:11 

BOUND FOR: Nishi-Funabashi direction
Ōmiya             09:30      09:54                    Kaihin Makuhari  10:42
Ōmiya             18:03      18:31                    Nishi-Funabashi  19:04
Ōmiya             20:57      21:24                    Shin-Narashino   22:11
Musashino (direct-service trains between Musashino Line west end and Ōmiya Station)
Trains departing from Fuchū Honmachi stop at Kita-Fuchū, Nishi-Kokubunji, Shin-Kodaira, Shin-Akitsu, Higashi-Tokorozawa, Niiza, and Kita-Asaka.
Trains departing from Hachiōji stop at Tachikawa, Shin-Kodaira, Shin-Akitsu, Higashi-Tokorozawa, Niiza, and Kita-Asaka.
Code:
Origin           Dep.Time   Arr. Kita-Asaka     Dest.      Arr.Time
BOUND FOR: Ōmiya direction
Fuchū Honmachi    07:34      07:59             Ōmiya     08:11
Fuchū Honmachi    08:29      08:54             Ōmiya     09:10
Hachiōji          09:55      10:38             Ōmiya     10:50
Hachiōji          16:52      17:32             Ōmiya     17:44

BOUND FOR: Hachiōji direction
Ōmiya             08:53      09:08             Hachiōji  09:50
Ōmiya             15:52      16:08             Hachiōji  16:45
Ōmiya             18:47      19:06             Hachiōji  19:47
New rapid-service trains on the Nambu Line
During the midday period (trains departing Musashi Kosugi between 10:00 and 15:00), we will establish rapid-service trains running twice an hour in both directions, improving the convenience and speed of the Nambu Line. As a result, the current journey time between Kawasaki and Noborito will be reduced by approx. 5 minutes.

Stopping pattern:



Other service improvements
Increased convenience for lines in the Greater Tōkyō area
Through increasing the range of through-services or increasing the number of services, we will improve convenience in the Greater Tōkyō area.
  • On the Musashino Line, we will expand through-service to Tōkyō Station during the midday period on weekends and holidays.
  • On the Keiyō Line, we will expand through-service onto the Sotobō Line during the midday period.
  • On the Yokohama Line, we will relieve overcrowding by increasing the number of trains during the evening period.
  • On the Nambu Line, we will relieve overcrowding by extending services running during the evening period. (Takes effect March 2011)
Introduction of new rolling stock
  • On the Keiyō Line, we will continue introducing new wide-body rolling stock (E233 series) to relieve overcrowding.
Modifications to service structure
Due to declining ridership, we will modify a portion of limited express services in the Greater Tōkyō area:
  • Elimination of some services, during weekends and holidays only
    • Akagi (Takasaki Line, Jōetsu Line)
    • Shiosai (Sōbu Line, Narita Line)
    • Wakashio (Sotobō Line)
  • Elimination of some services, during weekdays only
    • Ayame (Sōbu Line, Narita Line)
  • Elimination of some services
    • Odoriko (Tōkaidō Line)
    • Sazanami (Uchibō Line)
  • Elimination (conversion to irregular service)
    • Minakami (Takasaki Line, Jōetsu Line)
  • Elimination
    • Ohayō Tochigi, Hometown Tochigi (Utsunomiya Line)
Just when I was beginning to wonder what they wanted to do with this "Tōkyō Mega Loop"... An interesting idea, and I'm curious how well it will work.

Not so ecstatic about the Nambu Line rapid service... For only five minutes, seems like they should just have increased frequency across the entire line. However, this marks the return of rapid service on the Nambu Line, which was last seen in 1969, when JR was still JNR.

According to press releases from the Hachiōji Branch Office of JR East, they will also be adjusting schedules on the Chūō Rapid Line, Ōme Line, and Itsukaichi Line, bringing them closer to "pattern" schedules and allowing them to decrease journeys on the intercity Azusa and Kaiji limited express trains between Kōfu and Shinjuku by as much as five minutes.
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:27 AM   #1830
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Yamanote Line platform doors at Meguro Station in service

I let this one slip in the last batch of updates.

Platform doors are now installed at both trial stations (Ebisu and Meguro) and they will be surveying the effectiveness and the impact to dwell times and scheduling before introducing the doors to the rest of the stations. Doors are still not installed at the stopping locations for Car No. 7 and Car No. 10, as the six-door cars are still being phased out.


Source: karibajct on YouTube
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:28 AM   #1831
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JR Ichikawa Station South Exit station plaza and pedestrian deck

A few pictures of the recently-improved South Exit area at JR Ichikawa Station. The pedestrian deck was opened in February of this year, with the station plaza following in March. Ichikawa Station is a major station on the Sōbu Main Line between Tōkyō and Chiba, and both local (Sōbu Local Line) and rapid (Sōbu Rapid Line) trains stop here. Average daily entries are 58,900 passengers.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

First, an aerial to get us oriented. JR Ichikawa Station is at center, and adjacent to the station's South Exit is the recently-completed I-link Town Ichikawa redevelopment project. The East Tower is 37 stories (130 m) with 398 apartments, while the West Tower is 45 stories (160 m) and 572 condominiums. Also included are retail, a nursing home, government facilities, a library, and a day care facility. Most of the project came online in 2009.



The scene leaving JR Ichikawa Station at the South Exit. Escalators and stairwells take you to the second-level pedestrian deck or to ground level. An additional third level above is accessible by stairs or elevator.



Second-level pedestrian deck, which is covered and directly connected to both I-link Town Ichikawa towers.



Third-level pedestrian deck, which is open-air. On the other side of the glass is the train station, roughly at the same elevation, allowing visitors to get their trainspotting and people-watching done.



From the West Tower, showing the bi-level pedestrian deck. Behind, a Sōbu Local Line train is stopped at the station.





The roadway on the south side of the station was widened.



From the East Tower:

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:29 AM   #1832
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Mobile Suica to begin accepting Android smartphones
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20101001.pdf

Quote:
JR East will provide Mobile Suica service to KDDI's new FeliCa-compatible Android-based smartphones. The start of service is scheduled for the first half of FY2011.

East Japan Railway Company (HQ: Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō; President and Representative Director: Seino Satoshi; JR East) will provide Mobile Suica service to KDDI's FeliCa-compatible (IC-chip loaded) Android-based mobile phones ("Android smartphones") in the first half of FY2011.

Mobile Suica launched in January 2006, and is currently in use by approx. 2.18 million registered members. From March 2010, we have launched autocharge services for Mobile Suica, which, together with the diverse service menu we have provided up to date, has received high praise from our customers.

By expanding our Mobile Suica service to Android smartphones, JR East will provide high-quality services such as railway usage, Shinkansen tickets, and electronic money to the ever-growing percentage of smartphone users.

In the future, JR East will continue to deliver a more convenient, more pleasant lifestyle to our customers through the Mobile Suica service.
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:29 AM   #1833
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JR East wins Frontier Design Award for new smartphone augmented reality technology
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20101002.pdf

Quote:
At JR East, in order to meet the goals expressed in our Group Business Vision 2020 plan to "improve customer satisfaction," we have been working to create stations that are comfortable and pleasant to use.

Our research on "Station Space Information Systems using Floor-Surface Signage and Smartphones"—currently being undertaken at our Smart Station Laboratory with the goal of realizing a station interior navigation system that meets the needs of every customer—has received a FY2010 Good Design / Frontier Design Award.

We will now continue our research and development in making comfortable and pleasant stations through active use of these technologies.

Development goals
We believe that provision of information inside train stations that meets the needs of each and every customer is vital. As a result, by crafting a system that provides the necessary information to customers' smartphones, we can create "easy-to-use stations" for each and every customer, leading to improved passenger service.

Development details
Using smartphones, we are developing a station interior information system using augmented reality (AR) technology. Floor-surface signs featuring AR identification marks are installed at specific locations, allowing for the display of information regarding the location of station facilities when scanning the floor-surface signs using a smartphone. Through use of this technology, we are now able to display directional information even in station interior environments where GPS and electronic compass technology is non-functional. Currently, we are continuing research and development of the technology inside our Smart Station Laboratory at the JR East Research and Development Center.



Testing recognition rate and marker analysis at the Smart Station Laboratory



Augmented reality (AR) display



Facility information display



Smartphone top page (left) and typical camera image (right)



AR display (left) and facility information display (right)



Station interior map display

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:30 AM   #1834
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Tōkyō Metro reveals group business structure in Tōkyō Metro – Toei Subway merger talks
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/na...902000034.html

Quote:
It has been revealed that among Tōkyō Metro group companies, which handle everything from property leasing to golf practice grounds, all twelve (with the exception of one) are top companies posting regular profits, and that the majority of group company employees are former Metro employees. Tōkyō Metro is a special company where the national government and Tōkyō Metropolitan Government own 100% of all company stock, but for a company that has received tax money to expand its business operations, the news is likely to have a profound impact on how the company will eventually be privatized.

The information was revealed in documents submitted at a conference between the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) to discuss a merger between Tōkyō Metro and the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government’s Toei Subway, held September 8.

According to the documents, Tōkyō Metro has a total of twelve subsidiary companies, including six “outsource” companies contracted to perform outsourced work related to railway operations such as rolling stock and track maintenance; five “profit-focused” companies managing golf practice grounds and retail facilities such as the Shinjuku Metro Shokudōgai restaurant mall; and one company purposed to encourage increased ridership by passengers with physical disabilities. For the fiscal year ending March 2010, Metro subsidiary companies posted net profits of ¥1.7 billion, including ¥580 million for Metro Commerce Co., Ltd., which receives contracts for station retail management.

In addition, 39 out of the 41 full-time executive positions in Metro subisidiaries are currently filled by ex-Tōkyō Metro employees who have retired or been transferred from Tōkyō Metro, and average annual officer compensation is ¥12 million.

Citing the Toei Subway’s long-term debt, Tōkyō Metro officials have expressed hesitation to the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government, which has been pushing for a merger. Tōkyō vice-governor Inose Naoki criticized the current situation: “The Metro is a public corporation funded using tax money from the Metropolitan and national governments. The profits should be used to improve passenger service.” Inose has been calling for a unification of fare structure and services through the merger, and a return of profits gained back to the Metro users.

In response to an interview by Tōkyō Shimbun, Metro spokespersons said, “Many of the business duties require specialized knowledge and skills, as well as intimate coordination with the Metro itself. As a result, we need retired or transfer employees for these executive positions. This is no different than any other corporation that has a group business structure.”
Another article here also says that the Toei Subway has three related companies handling maintenance / administration, real estate management, and other tasks, as well as one related entity. Out of the 16 executive positions in those companies, ten are transfers or former employees of the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government Bureau of Transportation.

Tōkyō MX news report (2010.09.08):

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:31 AM   #1835
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Tōkyō Metro and GEO team up to provide DVD rental machines in subway stations
http://www.rbbtoday.com/article/2010/09/29/70917.html

Quote:
Tōkyō Metro and DVD rental shop GEO will install "GEO BOX" automatic DVD rental machines inside Tōkyō Metro stations and launch a service where users can rent DVDs on the subway. Ten stations are scheduled to receive the machines, which will gradually enter service beginning October 1.

The GEO BOX unit contains 1,000 DVDs. Customers input their email address into the monitor and after passing their credit card through the reader to pay the ¥100 per DVD rental fee (12 hour time-limit for new titles, 24-hour limit for other titles), the requested title is provided. Returns are handled by inserting the DVDs into the same GEO BOX.

All units are installed outside the paid station area in "easy-to-find locations" (Tōkyō Metro's Business Development Department).

GEO already has 40 such automatic rental units in operation in the Greater Tōkyō area inside supermarkets and convenience stores, but this is the first time the company is venturing inside subway stations. Exact locations can be confirmed on the GEO BOX homepage.

The stations receiving the units are Nihonbashi, Ginza, Higashi-Ginza, Shibuya, Tameike ‒ Sannō, Meiji Jingū-mae, Iidabashi, Azabu Jūban, Shirokane ‒ Takanawa, and Tsukishima.

For rentals, returning the DVD is more cumbersome than renting it. Spokespersons for Tōkyō Metro say, "We will continue to provide convenient services to our customers. If the program proves popular, we would love to expand it." For passengers commuting to or from work and school, it may just prove a convenient option.

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:32 AM   #1836
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Groundbreaking on Shibuya Station Block Land Readjustment Project
http://www.tokyu.co.jp/contents_inde...ws/101013.html
http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2010/2010-1013.html
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20101005.pdf

Quote:
In the Shibuya Station Block centered around Shibuya Station, following the Shibuya Station Block Basic Improvements Plan (June 2008) and master plan approval (June 2009), landowners (Tōkyū Corporation, East Japan Railway Company, and Tōkyō Metro Co., Ltd.) and the Urban Renaissance Agency have been advancing plans for a land readjustment project to reconstruct and expand public facilities such as the station plaza in coordination with the upgrade of railway facility functions and station tenant building redevelopment.

Tomorrow (October 14), pursuant to the provisions of Article 4, Paragraph 1 of the Land Readjustment Act, the Shibuya Station Block Land Readjustment Project, a Tōkyō Metropolitan Government urban planning project, is scheduled to be approved to take effect, and we have begun groundbreaking for the project.

About the Shibuya Station Block Land Readjustment Project, a Tōkyō Metropolitan Government urban planning project

Name
Shibuya Station Block Land Readjustment Project, a Tōkyō Metropolitan Government urban planning project

Executor
Shibuya Station Block Land Readjustment Project Co-Executors:
  • Tōkyū Corporation
  • Urban Renaissance Agency (UR), an Independent Administrative Corporation
    Due to its extensive experience and expertise in a wide variety of work dealing with land readjustment projects in existing urbanized areas, as well as its neutrality and impartiality, UR has been brought in to participate in this project to offer project technical support and assist in the smooth advancement of this complex project, which requires coordination with a variety of urban infrastructures converging in this location, including railway facilities.
Landowners
Tōkyū Corporation
East Japan Railway Company
Tōkyō Metro Co., Ltd.

Project Zone
Portions of Dōgenzaka Itchōme, Dōgenzaka Nichōme, Shibuya Itchōme, Shibuya Nichōme, Shibuya Sanchōme, and Higashi Itchōme in Shibuya Ward

Scheduled Final Approval Date
October 14, 2010

Execution Period
FY2010 - FY2026

Project Qualities and Significance
  1. Through the redesign and expansion of public facilities such as a station plaza in the zone centered on Shibuya Station—one of the largest public transport terminals in Japan—this project will create a safe and pleasant urban space and become a chance for connected urban renewal in the areas surrounding Shibuya Station, which have been identified as an Urban Renewal Emergency Improvements Area.
  2. Through public-private partnerships, this project will be executed in unison with other projects including upgrades to Shibuya Station's functionality and station tenant building redevelopments, and as part of the large-scale Urban Renewal Project, will seek to upgrade urban infrastructures.
  3. Timed with the undergrounding of the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line currently under construction and through-service with the Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line and in coordination with functionality upgrades to both JR and Tōkyō Metro Shibuya Station, this project will three-dimensionally redesign public space such as station plazas and seek to strengthen the functions of Shibuya Station as a transport hub.
Primary Elements of the Plan
  • Improvements to the east and west station plazas (including the East Exit underground plaza and West Exit taxi pool), creating a safe and pleasant pedestrian space and strengthening the functionality of the station as a hub for multiple transportation modes.
  • Together with improvements to the east and west station plazas, relocation of the Ginza Line viaduct columns and Shibuya Creek.
  • Construction of rainwater retention facilities below the East Exit station plaza, creating a safe and comfortable neighborhood that is resistant to water damage.
  • Construction of two public passages connecting the east and west station plazas on the north and south sides, creating a pleasant pedestrian space by securing the continuity and unity of the two station plazas.
First, an aerial of the station area:


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Plan images:
Source: Shibuya Ward

Red area is the extent of the Urban Renewal Emergency Improvements Area. Orange is the Shibuya Station Block.



Existing conditions. The four bay tracks at right in the drawing (at top in the bird's-eye view) are the Tōyoko Line.



Bird's-eye view after the improvements. Tōkyū's Shibuya Hikarie project (34 stories) currently under construction peeks in from the top left corner. Undergrounding of the Tōyoko Line platforms allows them to build a new station tenant building above the station.



Surface and aboveground levels. The Ginza Line coming in from the top right corner would be converted to an island platform configuration and the Saikyō Line platforms, almost invisible in the existing drawing, would be moved up parallel to the Yamanote Line.



Pedestrian deck



Underground level



Urban design improvements near Shibuya Creek.



East Exit station plaza conceptual sketch. Looks like they want to do some sort of screening to hide the Ginza Line viaduct.



West Exit station plaza conceptual sketch. This area is a mess right now on foot, since you have to walk through the bus zone in the middle... Will be nice to have a dedicated pedestrian connection at street level.


Last edited by quashlo; October 26th, 2010 at 10:39 AM.
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:33 AM   #1837
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Testing and crew training on Tōkyō Metro 16000 series begins

A few videos of the start of testing and crew training on the new 16000 series for the Chiyoda Line. Units are being tested not only on the Chiyoda Line, but also on the Odakyū Odawara Line and Tama Line and the JR Jōban Local Line, which all have through-service arrangements with the Chiyoda Line.

At Ayase Station and Shin-Ochanomizu Station:


Source: shinkyuvideo on YouTube

At Yoyogi Uehara Station. In both this and the next video, the train sounds quite different from even the 15000 series, perhaps because of the PMSMs.


Source: tobu2181 on YouTube

At Yoyogi Kōen Station:


Source: tobu2181 on YouTube
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:34 AM   #1838
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Vintage Eidan Subway manner posters: Part 1

Vintage manner posters used on the Eidan Subway (now known as Tōkyō Metro). With all the cultural references (both Japanese and Western) and parodies, it's quite interesting as pop art. Enjoy!
Source: http://pinktentacle.com/

All descriptions and analysis are quoted directly from the original blog post.

October 1982
"The Three Annoying Train Monsters"
The three annoying train monsters shown in the poster are Nesshii (the sleeping monster), Asshii (the leg-crossing monster), and Shinbunshii (the newspaper-reading monster).



July 1976
"The Seat Monopolizer"
Inspired by Charlie Chaplin's "The Great Dictator," this poster encourages passengers not to take up more seat space than necessary.



June 1977
"Don't forget your umbrella"
This poster of the high-class courtesan Agemaki (from the kabuki play "Sukeroku"), whose captivating beauty was said to make men forgetful, is meant to remind passengers to take their umbrellas when they leave the train.



March 1979
"Space Invader"
This 1979 poster pays tribute to the extremely popular Space Invaders video arcade game and encourages passengers to read their newspapers without invading the space of other passengers.



May 1979
"Isami-ashi: Wait behind the white line"
The image of sumo wrestlers locked in combat serves as a reminder for passengers to stand safely behind the white line when waiting for the train.



October 1981
"Don't forget your umbrella"
The text at the top of this poster -- which shows Jesus overwhelmed with umbrellas at the Last Supper -- reads "Kasane-gasane no kami-danomi" (lit. "Wishing to God again and again"). The poster makes a play on the words "kasa" (umbrella) and "kasane-gasane" (again and again).



March 1977
"Shimatta"
This poster warns passengers against getting their shoulder bags caught in the train doors.

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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:34 AM   #1839
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Vintage Eidan Subway manner posters: Part 2

May 1981
"The Non-Thinker"
The image of a cross-legged version of Auguste Rodin's "The Thinker" aims to encourage passengers to sit in a way that is considerate of other passengers.



April 1979
"Do not rush onto the train"
This poster advises passengers not to rush onto the train at the last moment. The text (かけこみ禁寺) is a play on the words かけこみ禁止 (kakekomi kinshi - "don't rush onto the train") and かけこみ寺 (Kakekomi-dera - Kakekomi temple), which has long been known as a sanctuary for married women fleeing their husbands.



September 1978
"Clearly show your train pass"
The image of Napoleon holding a partially concealed train pass is meant to remind passengers to clearly show their train passes to the station attendant when passing through the gates. The dictionary page in the background appears to be a reference to Napoleon's famous quote, "The word 'impossible' is not in my dictionary."



April 1977
"When the bell chimes, it's too late"
This poster, which depicts Cinderella rushing from the ball at the stroke of midnight, is meant to warn passengers against the danger of trying to rush into the train after the departure chime sounds.



December 1977
"Mary is tired"
The image of Mary carrying baby Jesus aims to encourage passengers to give up their seats to mothers with small children.



June 1980
"Wasureemon"
Doraemon offers a friendly reminder not to forget your umbrella. The text at the bottom is a suggestion to write your name, address and company name (or school name) on your possessions.



November 1982
"Non-smoking Time"
The image of John Wayne on a mock cover of Time magazine serves as a reminder not to smoke on the platform during non-smoking hours (7:00-9:30 AM and 5:00-7:00 PM).



More posters are available at: http://pinktentacle.com/2010/08/vint...anner-posters/
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:36 AM   #1840
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Station area aerials: Part 1

A series of photos showing aerial (bird's eye) shots of station areas. Gives a good idea of the scale and type of development around each station. All original images are from the famous blog http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/, with my translations overlaid.

Warabi Station
JR: 58,700 daily entries (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Urawa Station
JR: 79,400 daily entries (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Kawaguchi Station
JR: 79,500 daily entries (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Ōmiya Station
JR: 236,400 daily entries (2009)
Tōbu: 139,400 daily entries and exits (2009)
Saitama New Urban Transit: 47,500 daily entries and exits (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Musashi Urawa Station
JR: 45,300 daily entries (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Urawa Misono Station
Saitama Railway: 5,100 daily entries (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Koshigaya Station
Tōbu: 46,000 daily entries and exits (2008)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Koshigaya Laketown Station
JR: 13,800 daily entries (2009)


Original image from http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/
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