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Old November 25th, 2010, 07:34 PM   #1941
quashlo
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Yellow = cut and cover
Pink = shield tunneling
You are correct on the other two.

I believe the line is supposed to open all at once, in 2015. I did a quick search and couldn't find anything to suggest otherwise.
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Old November 25th, 2010, 10:28 PM   #1942
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Thanks for the info.

Other than the Sakuradori Line extension in Nagoya that is due to open in March of next year and the Tozai Line in Sendai, are there any other new subway segments being built in Japan at this time?
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Old November 26th, 2010, 12:34 AM   #1943
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All-new urban railway lines under construction:
  • Greater Tōkyō:
    • Sōtetsu / JR Through Line: Nishiya — Yokohama Hazawa (2.7 km)
    • Sōtetsu / Tōkyū Through Line: Yokohama Hazawa — Hiyoshi (10.0 km)
    • Tōhoku Through Line: Ueno — Tōkyō (3.8 km)
  • Kansai (Ōsaka-Kōbe-Kyōto)
    • Ōsaka Higashi Line: Hanaten — Shin-Ōsaka (11.1 km)
There's a few other other major under-construction projects like grade-separation (pretty much each of the major JRs and major private railways has at least one underway) and short connections for through-service (Tōkyū Tōyoko Line). In terms of projects in advanced planning, most notable are probably Naniwasuji Line (Shin-Ōsaka to Kansai International Airport via Ōsaka / Umeda and Namba) and Asakusa Line bypass (bypass along Toei Asakusa Line to speed up trips between Haneda and Narita).
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Old November 26th, 2010, 05:38 AM   #1944
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judging by your earlier posts, the Tohoku Through Line involves adding new track to an existing railroad right-of-way in order to allow trains on one line to go further south; the other ones you mention actually add something new to the map, right?

It seems Yokohama Hazawa is currently a freight station. Will the 2 projects involving that station run parallel to the Tokaido Shinkansen? Is any of this underground?

As for the extension of the Osaka Higashi Line, will any of it be underground?
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Old November 26th, 2010, 09:13 PM   #1945
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Up to you want you want to call as "adding something new to the map"... Tōkyō's railway network is already so developed that few new lines will be constructed in the future. At this point, it's really just a few extensions and then capitalizing on the infrastructure already there by adding track connections for through-service, etc.

The Sōtetsu / Tōkyū Through Line is all underground and will run parallel to the Tōkaidō Shinkansen to some extent, with an intermediate stop at Shin-Yokohama. The Sōtetsu / JR Through Line is really just a short connection between the Sōtetsu Main Line and an existing freight line so that Sōtetsu trains can through-service onto the JR Shōnan-Shinjuku Line.

I don't believe Ōsaka Higashi Line is underground... If I remember correctly, it's just using improving existing freight tracks (Jōtō Freight Line).
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Old November 26th, 2010, 09:41 PM   #1946
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If Tokyo build anymore rail lines pretty soon they wont need buses at all. That city to me is full of railroad tracks and over thousands of train stations.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 11:58 PM   #1947
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It's wise that Japanese urban rail operators are directing their capital funds towards grade separation rather than new lines.

Besides Tokyo, is there any other city in the world where during rush hour, a street is blocked 40 out of 60 minutes because trains must pass through on a grade crossing?
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Old November 27th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #1948
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
thanks for the quick reply; looks like Nagoya metro was lagging behind much of the rest of Japan in terms of implementing contactless cards.
Hey, I live in Nagoya and ride the Higashiyama and Meijo subway line all the time; others most of the time.

I asked a JR staffer if they will accept the Manaca cards in February, and they said "maybe for commuters at first." The new Manaca TVMs are being installed rapidly across the subway lines, but I have yet to see an installation on Meitetsu. I'll get a photo of them tomorrow if anyone wants one.

There are ads EVERYWHERE in the subway... Again, nothing on Meitetsu that I've seen. I did notice the turnstiles at Meitetsu Nagoya had their "tap panels" installed... But like the subway, the actual "tap here" signage hasn't been applied yet.

As for Kintetsu-- If Yurika is accepted at a station, then you'll be able to use Manaca. I expect this to involve of the Nagoya line from Kintetsu Nagoya down to Ise-Nakagawa. There are tons of commuters from Yokkaichi and Tsu that have to get to Nagoya and fan out on the subway everyday. Plus this part of the line already takes Yurika, so its rather expected that they upgrade to the next tech.

And yes, I have NO idea why it's taken this long for Nagoya to get on the IC bandwagon; but people say that the transport group here is notoriously cheap... Those four stations past Nonami on the Sakura-dori line were to have been built 8 years ago! I'm told there was also supposed to be some through-tracking with Meitetsu's Seto line, and Komaki-line (Kami-Ida subway extension)-- this is why the Sakura-dori line was built with pantographs... Not just because they share the Tsurumai line's yard in Akaike.

Last edited by starrwulfe; November 27th, 2010 at 03:19 PM. Reason: added the quote for which I was replying to for context
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Old November 27th, 2010, 04:14 PM   #1949
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
JR Central selects Yodobashi Camera for Nagoya Station tenant building; stores near train stations are key
http://www.nikkei.com/news/category/...2E2E2E2;at=ALL
wow. Nagoya station is going to look totally different AGAIN 3 years from now then. I work in the building across the street from that in a building called The Dai Nagoya Building; it too will get razed sometime in 2011/2012 for a new tower to go up. (I have no idea what the company I work for plans to do about moving somewhere else BTW )
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Old November 27th, 2010, 05:50 PM   #1950
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why is it called manaca? Is it like Main Nagoya Card?
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Old November 27th, 2010, 06:42 PM   #1951
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
why is it called manaca? Is it like Main Nagoya Card?
good question. I'd like to think its a play on the word 真ん中 (manaka) which means "middle" since we're in the center of Japan. Nagoya is called the 中部 (chuubu- central region) so I think that's got more to do with it.

UPDATE: Yup, I was right!

ちなみに、manaca(マナカ)の名前の由来は、「日本の真ん中をつなぎ、くらしの真ん中をつなぐICカード」からきています。
By the way, manaca's name means "Connecting the center of Japan via this IC card (the "ka" sound is abbreviated from card as well-- like in Osaka's "ICOCA" card-- 行こ is Iko, and カ or ka is card... so "Go-Card"...

So Manaca means "middle card" literally...

Clear that up for ya? (and me too!!)

BTW, I was scouring the net in Japanese and found this blog where someone has put together some interesting info on Manaca. Got some good pix too.
So the next few shots are courtesy http://www.manacan.net/

Here are shots of the posters I see everyday in the subway now...



Here we have the new manaca charge machine. The one at my station was installed last Monday. This is simailar to the Toica standalone units on JR lines.

Notice it's proximity to the fare adjustment machine. If you don't have enough charge on your manaca, then you use this to put more ¥ on it before exiting the wicket... Problem is, that one looks like it takes only bills. What if I'm only ¥20 short?! What if I have no bills?!

The actual card

Kinda generic... But I'm guessing you can print your name and commuter pass info on it like all other IC farecards here in Japan, so they need to keep it legible...

again, what facinates me about all of this is the e-money part..

This map shows what cards will interlink with each other by 8/2011. I currently hold a Suica, ICOCA and of course a Toica card. All the Lawsons conveinence stores here started accepting Toica/Suica/ICOCA cards here in Nagoya in September. Circle K and 7-11 are supposed to start soon as well. This is great, because I never seem to be able to go to the ATM to get cash when I need it, but always have about ¥3000 on my IC cards! Also note there the line between manaca and toica. The top explanation says "Spring 2011 for transit use" meaning you can use a manaca card on JR lines and toica card in the subway then. The bottom says "Spring 2012 for e-money" meaning you can use manaca on the toica/suica/icoca retailer's POS system then, and vice-versa. This is a relief for me; I'll be making a commute involving the subway and the JR Tokaido line starting next year, and I hate having to keep up with multiple passes already...

Last edited by starrwulfe; November 27th, 2010 at 06:58 PM. Reason: explanation of fares
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Old November 27th, 2010, 08:13 PM   #1952
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Quote:
but people say that the transport group here is notoriously cheap...
If by that you mean Meitetsu, I have to agree, at least for anecdotal reasons- I noticed weed control is not a priority on many lines, and some of the toilets in the stations are among the grottiest I've seen in Japan.
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Old November 27th, 2010, 08:28 PM   #1953
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These IC card stick diagrams are great... It's always interesting to watch the trend towards (hopefully) a nationwide card system. The private / subway cards are clearly at a disadvantage, as the JR's are already leveraging their inter-company connections and market share in the regional / intercity rail department. Virtually all of the inter-metropolitan interoperability agreements are between JR cards. The only exception is Kyūshū, where nimoca (Nishitetsu) and Hayakaken (Fukuoka City Subway) have interoperability agreements with Suica.

And there's also a whole slew of IC card systems for smaller operators scattered across Japan, like IruCa (Takamatsu — Kotohira Electric Railroad), Ecomyca (Toyama Chihō Railroad), LuLuCa (Shizuoka Railway), etc. Due to proximity and travel patterns, there could be some possible connections like Ecomyca + ICOCA or LuLuCa + TOICA, so it will be interesting to see how these will figure into the picture, if at all.
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Old November 27th, 2010, 08:31 PM   #1954
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
And yes, I have NO idea why it's taken this long for Nagoya to get on the IC bandwagon; but people say that the transport group here is notoriously cheap...
It's hard to blame them for not wanting to spend money on all the systems infrastructure, as it does take investment in not just new faregates / card readers, ticket machines, and fare adjustment machines, but also behind-the-scenes stuff like mainframe servers, data management systems, etc. And since not everything can be completely transferred over, you still need to maintain traditional ticketing schemes using magnetic tickets.

Plus, I think the profitability of Nagoya area operators like Meitetsu is fairly low, probably because of the suburbanization and Aichi's connection with the auto industry. They just don't have a whole lot of money lying around that they can tap into for these kinds of capital investments. Meitetsu always seems to be hanging on by a string and they have several suburban / peripheral lines on the brink of abandonment. The Municipal Subway has also racked up quite a bit of debt through expansion and probably and it seems likely they won't be adding new lines anytime soon.

BTW, welcome to the forum. You should drop by the Japan Forum.
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Old November 28th, 2010, 05:13 PM   #1955
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
It's hard to blame them for not wanting to spend money on all the systems infrastructure...
true, true... But really since all the players involved are using Sony's Felica system, and are aligned with Suica, they could've done a turnkey deal with that group. That's how Pasmo got off the ground so quickly... ICCOCA and the Surreto group that controls PiTaPa did a similar deal. Wouldn't be hard for JR Tokai to work with the Transpass folks here (mainly Meitetsu and Nagoya City DOT) to do something like that... But it's all about the money.

Quote:
Plus, I think the profitability of Nagoya area operators like Meitetsu is fairly low, probably because of the suburbanization and Aichi's connection with the auto industry. They just don't have a whole lot of money lying around that they can tap into for these kinds of capital investments. Meitetsu always seems to be hanging on by a string and they have several suburban / peripheral lines on the brink of abandonment.
You're right on with that one... Aichi grew like a certain American city I'm from called Atlanta. Meitetsu simply couldn't keep up I think, because places like Nishio, Togo, or even Tenpaku and Midori wards in Nagoya should have more rail service, and they just don't. Then there's Nakagawa ward and Mie...

I often think what should happen is Kintetsu should buy Meitetsu... Absurd? It would make sense though. They share the same track gauge I believe, and it wouldn't take too much re-doing of the platforms of Nagoya Kintetsu/Metetsu to join em together-- at least pedestrian wise... There's already a pass thru faregate from the Inuyama/Gifu platform into the Kintetsu station on the other side of the wall... You can see the trains parked there! Since Nagoya Station will be getting a new Maglev Shinkansen platform in the 4th sub-basement in 10 years, they can use that as an excuse to re-do Kintetsu/Metetsu Nagoya as well... Just a thought.

Quote:
The Municipal Subway has also racked up quite a bit of debt through expansion and probably and it seems likely they won't be adding new lines anytime soon.
A lot of that debt is due to questionable land deals they had to do to get the eastern side of the Meijo line loop done, I wonder. But Eidan had lots of debt too, until it "melted away" with the creation of Tokyo metro I think--And now they are reluctant to merge with Toei. Aichi doesn't really kick in much in the way of finances to the City Subway here... Unlike other metros in Japan. So the growth has been stunted. And its a well-known fact that the majority of the riders that are paying fares everyday come from outside Nagoya city proper. It would've been cool for Meitetsu to have made some more connections with the city a la the Tsurumai line--that way, there would have been a vested intrest in all parties to make the subway AND meitetsu a more cohiesive entity here, just like they due in Kanto and in Kansai areas...

Quote:
BTW, welcome to the forum. You should drop by the Japan Forum.
thanx! for anyone interested, I am the online editor for RAN magazine, the English art/music/urban magazine here in the Tokai/Chubu area. Also I have my own site as well... Use my handle here on google, and you'll find it soon enough!
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Old November 28th, 2010, 05:20 PM   #1956
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo
It's always interesting to watch the trend towards (hopefully) a nationwide card system.
I'm waiting for the day when Suica becomes a marque like Edy or ID or even Visa (!) on other operators IC cards, so there's less confusion with what will work where...

Personally I have IC cards for Suica, ICOCA, and Toica, since I travel regularly to Kanto/Kansai and here of course. However since I mainly take the subway around town more than anything, I end up just using them as money cards at Lawson or Aeon/JUSCO/MaxValue when I go to the mall... The Aeon group of malls here MANDATE that ALL the tenant stores in their properties MUST take EVERY IC card BTW. So even the Starbucks that are in there take 'em...
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Old November 28th, 2010, 05:27 PM   #1957
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
If by that you mean Meitetsu, I have to agree, at least for anecdotal reasons- I noticed weed control is not a priority on many lines, and some of the toilets in the stations are among the grottiest I've seen in Japan.
True... I'm not sure about the toilets all over the place though... almost any potty in Japan pales in comparison to the toxic no zone that is the typical transit public toilet back in the US for me... If you get out into the sticks, most rail ops here in Japan kinda "let thangs go" in terms of vegitation and such... The Keikyu like past Yokosuka, and the Nose line past Nose Guchi Chuo in Hyogo come to mind, as I've been on those personally.
One things for certain though... The stations themselves could use a freshening...
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Old November 28th, 2010, 08:58 PM   #1958
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I have a few questions about a question-mark-shaped transit line in Japan.

Why is it called the Astram line? Does that have something to do with the Asian Games that were held there in 1994? And are there any plans to extend it south deeper into Hiroshima?
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Old November 29th, 2010, 07:39 AM   #1959
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As = asu ("tomorrow")
tram = tram

Basically "tram of the future" or something like that.

Long-term plan for the Astram Line:

Source: Hiroshima City

Pink = Seifū Shinto Line, from Kōiki Kōen-mae to Nishi-Hiroshima
Green = Tōzai Line, from Nishi-Hiroshima to Hiroshima
Yellow = Namboku Line, from Hon-dōri to Hiroshima University

I think they changed their plan to try to use LRT (e.g., upgrade of the streetcars) or less costly modes, so if these do get built, they may not be with the same technology as the Astram Line.
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Old November 29th, 2010, 07:45 AM   #1960
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FY2009 ridership numbers, major Tōkyō area operators: Part 1

train-media.net has just released the compiled FY2009 ridership for major railway operators in the Greater Tōkyō. Translated excerpts are below.

Ridership by operator and line:
Code:
Line                       Total  Change
Keihin Electric Express Railway     
  Main Line            1,135,073  (1.2%)
  Airport Line           150,973  (2.1%)
  Daishi Line             67,040   0.1%
  Zushi Line              42,795  (1.1%) 
  Kurihama Line          125,670  (0.9%)
  ALL LINES            1,212,399  (1.1%)
    (exclusing duplicate ridership)

Tōkyō Metro 
  Ginza Line           1,020,371  (3.0%)
  Marunouchi Line      1,093,564  (0.8%)
  Hibiya Line          1,093,634  (2.3%)
  Tōzai Line           1,320,588  (1.1%)
  Chiyoda Line         1,138,948  (0.3%)
  Yūrakuchō Line         917,047   1.5%
  Hanzōmon Line          857,854   0.4%
  Namboku Line           446,217   0.5%
  Fukutoshin Line        308,156  18.9%
  ALL LINES            6,327,852  (0.5%)
    (exclusing duplicate ridership)

Keisei Electric Railway
  Main Line              504,534  (0.6%)
  Higashi-Narita Line      1,189  (2.9%)
  Oshiage Line           131,984  (0.4%)
  Kanamachi Line          17,505   1.6%
  Chiba Line              40,079   0.7%
  Chihara Line             9,754   0.2%
  ALL LINES              705,045  (0.4%)

Tōbu Railway
  Isesaki Line           845,472  (1.3%)
  Kameido Line            23,463  (0.8%)
  Daishi Line              7,614  (6.2%)
  Sano Line                4,157  (4.4%)
  Koizumi Line             2,643  (1.3%)
  Ōta Line                   154  19.4%
  Kiryū Line               3,293  (1.3%)
  Nikkō Line              42,915  (4.0%)
  Utsunomiya Line         12,357  (4.0%)
  Kinugawa Line            2,916  (6.0%)
  Noda Line              450,324  (1.0%)
  Tōjō Line              958,622  (1.2%)
  Ogose Line              19,533  (2.3%)
  ALL LINES            2,373,460  (1.3%)

Seibu Railway
  Ikebukuro Line         899,770  (0.2%)
  Shinjuku Line          964,136  (0.7%)
  ALL LINES            1,714,685  (0.5%)

Keiō Corporation
  Keiō Line            1,365,635  (0.6%)
  Inokashira Line        554,616  (0.6%)
  ALL LINES            1,748,604  (0.6%)

Odakyū Electric Railway
  Odawara Line         1,500,058  (0.9%)
  Enoshima Line          372,640  (0.9%)
  Tama Line               76,536   1.3%
  ALL LINES            1,949,234  (0.8%)

Tōkyū Corporation
  Tōyoko Line          1,128,773 (0.4%)
  Meguro Line            324,903  4.5%
  Den'en Toshi Line    1,167,184 (1.9%)
  Ōimachi Line           421,934  5.1%
  Ikegami Line           217,233 (0.4%)
  Tamagawa Line          140,921 (0.4%)
  Kodomo-no-Kuni Line     11,024 (1.1%)
  ALL LINES            2,866,722  0.2%
    (exclusing duplicate ridership)

East Japan Railway Company (FY2008)      Section
  Tōkaidō Line         4,087,003  0.6%   Tōkyō - Hiratsuka
  Nambu Line             728,625  1.1%   ALL
  Tsurumi Line            45,107  4.1%   ALL
  Yokohama Line          819,784  0.8%   Higashi-Kanagawa - Hachiōji
  Negishi Line           572,164 (0.3%)  Yokohama - Ōfuna
  Yokosuka Line          188,564  1.3%   Ōfuna - Kurihama
  Sagami Line             95,849  1.5%   ALL
  Chūō Line            3,218,800 (0.4%)  Tōkyō - Takao
  Musashino Line         848,027  2.7%   ALL
  Ōme Line               292,197 (0.4%)  Tachikawa - Okutama
  Itsukaichi Line         48,162 (1.9%)  Haijima - Musashi Itsukaichi
  Hachikō Line            63,079  1.5%   Hachiōji - Ogose
  Tōhoku Line          3,480,805  0.6%   Tōkyō - Kurihashi
  Takasaki Line          395,770  0.9%   Ōmiya - Fukiage
  Kawagoe Line           146,567  0.9%   Ōmiya - Komagawa
  Saikyō Line            396,022  0.8%   Akabane - Ōmiya
  Jōban Line           1,161,463 (0.5%)  Nippori - Ushiku
  Narita Line             91,964 (3.2%)  Abiko - Sakura
  Narita Branch Line       9,693 (0.8%)  Narita - Kusumi
  Narita Airport Line     22,901 (7.7%)  Narita - Narita Airport
  Sōbu Line            1,753,589  0.1%   Tōkyō - Yachimata
  Sotobō Line            269,099 (0.1%)  Chiba - Honda
  Uchibō Line            121,605 (1.4%)  Soga - Hamano
  Keiyō Line             609,677  1.7%   ALL
  Yamanote Line        3,788,890 (1.5%)  Tabata - Shinagawa
  Akabane Line           764,047  0.5%   Ikebukuro - Akabane
  Sōbu Branch Line     1,166,277 (0.6%)  Kinshichō - Ochanomizu
  ALL LINES           15,440,005  0.1%

Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation
  Asakusa Line           627,217 (0.8%)
  Mita Line              566,862  0.4%
  Shinjuku Line          665,233  0.3%
  Ōedo Line              792,256 (0.5%)
  ALL LINES            2,329,790 (0.3%)

Sagami Railway
  Main Line              568,184 (1.3%)
  Izumino Line            56,902 (0.2%)
  TOTAL                  625,086 (1.2%)
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