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Birmingham Metro Area For Birmingham, Wolverhampton and the West Midlands.



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Old March 19th, 2009, 01:26 AM   #1
Brums'grove
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Unemployment in Birmingham

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7789784.stm

Is it worrying that Birmingham has 4 out of the top 5 worst affected areas?
Birmingham Ladywood 10.7%
Birmingham Hodge Hill 9.6%
Birmingham Sparkbrook 9.1%
Birmingham Erdington 8.6%
Liverpool Walton 8.4%
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Old March 19th, 2009, 01:42 AM   #2
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Tell me about it!

Near to impossible for me to find work.
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Old March 19th, 2009, 01:49 AM   #3
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Ladywood is one of the areas in the UK with a massive range of extremes. It contains some of the most valuable parts of the city while also containing areas of extreme deprivation.

It doesn't surprise me to some extent based on the size of our city overall and the percentage of the population already on benefits and also that about 20%, I think I read recently, of population have no qualifications.

What we need to see is what various training, employment, vocational etc opportunities are going to be used to try and tackle this and also with a long term aim of reducing unemployment long term, not just getting it back to pre bust levels.
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Old March 20th, 2009, 09:44 PM   #4
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I was some distance away when i saw these diggers, i suddenly though "bloody hell.... they're starting the library already!!!" but it turns out it was an employment thing for JCB....



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Old March 21st, 2009, 10:56 AM   #5
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Tell me about it! I walked past them at around 8 last night, drunk, and I started telling them to transform into giant robots!
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Old March 23rd, 2009, 09:14 PM   #6
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Seems to go well enough in this thread.

Quote:
Birmingham pins hopes on manufacturing
By Jonathan Guthrie

Published: March 23 2009 01:25 | Last updated: March 23 2009 01:25

In Birmingham, as in most big cities in the Midlands and North of England, hope is evaporating that when London catches an economic cold the rest of the country will suffer only a sniffle. Development sites have been shelved across the city. Redundancies have hit both white-collar finance employees and blue-collar manufacturing employees.

So far, so ordinary. It is more interesting to ponder how this city of just under 1m inhabitants might emerge from recession. Recovery, according to the government, is supposed to be led by manufacturing. This is particularly ironic for Birmingham, whose economy a couple of years ago became more dependent on property businesses than manufacturing. Many business leaders expect that position to be reversed again by the recession.

The West Midlands has the third highest manufacturing turnover in the UK – £47bn ($68bn) in 2006 – which puts it just behind the more populous northwest and southeast. “There is no city better placed than Birmingham to exploit the opportunity to grow the manufacturing base,” says Jerry Blackett, chief executive of the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce.

The gloomy question with which locals are wrestling is whether enough of the manufacturing base will survive the recession for the city to reap maximum benefit from the upturn. Chris Clifford, chief executive of West Midlands CBI, says: “There are fabulous, world-class manufacturing companies in Birmingham, but they have to survive this crisis.”
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/1d196ece-1...0779fd2ac.html
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Old April 13th, 2009, 11:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
From The Times
April 14, 2009

Birmingham, Leeds and Glasgow top the list of UK cities hit hardest by job losses

Christine Buckley, Industrial Editor
London, despite the much-reported cull in financial services jobs, does not appear on the list of the ten UK cities worst hit by rising unemployment.

Instead, Birmingham, which is at the centre of much of Britain's car industry, and big cities in the North and Scotland are taking the brunt of job cuts in the current recession.

Also badly hit are areas associated with traditional manufacturing, which some argue have not fully recovered from previous recessions.

According to analysis from the Work Foundation, the employment think-tank, Birmingham has suffered the biggest rise in the number of people claiming jobseeker's allowance. In February the claimant rate in the city was 7.3per cent, up from 5.3per cent in the same month last year, with a total of 12,383 people signing on.

'...'
The large rise suffered by Birmingham follows a serious fall-off in jobs in the motor industry, as large manufacturers such as Jaguar Land Rover have cut back, causing numerous suppliers to shed jobs and cut back production in turn. Next month Unite, the biggest union in the UK, will stage a march in Birmingham to demand that the Government does more to help the automotive industry.

'...'
She warned: “Policymakers ignore how recessions play out locally at their peril. It is to be hoped that the forthcoming budget focuses much more attention on the large cities - Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham - that can drive the recovery, as well as recognising which areas need the most support to survive and prepare for better times.”
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle6087599.ece
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Old April 14th, 2009, 12:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
Morning Line: Bailed-out London escapes worst of the recession

By Tony Bonsignore | 10:56:08 | 14 April 2009

The recession was not supposed to be like this.

Just a few months ago we were told this would be an egalitarian recession that would hit all geographic areas and sectors equally hard.

We will all share the pain, governments and bankers told us with a sympathetic smile, as they slyly dipped their hands into our back pockets and emptied our wallets.

Today, however, the Work Foundation confirms what most of us already suspect – namely that the midlands, the north of England and Wales are suffering the worst in this recession, at least in terms of numbers unemployed.

Birmingham suffered the biggest outright jump in the number of people without work, rising to 7.3% in February from 5.3% a year earlier (measured by proportion of workforce claiming jobseeker’s allowance).

The highest overall unemployment rates, meanwhile, were Kingston-upon-Hull in Humberside at 8% (up from 4.8% a year ago), Blaenau Gwent in south Wales (also 8%), South Tyneside in the North East (6.90%) and Sandwell in the West Midlands (6.8%).

Pretty much the same kind of cities that got hammered the last time and the time before that, in fact.

Conspicuous by their absence from the Work Foundation’s list of recession job losers, however, are London and Edinburgh - the two cities whose residents have done more than any other in the UK to create this awful mess.

For many in these cities, it seems, life is going on pretty much as normal, if a little more subdued.

Those who live in the English capital and spend any time in the City can see plenty of anecdotal evidence for this all around them, from buzzing restaurants to busy headhunters to still barmy house prices.

Indeed, bankers’ minds are now turning firmly to the future, and how they can get the good times rolling again properly.

What has happened, in fact, now seems pretty clear: folk across the UK have been ordered to bail out big city financiers so they don’t lose their heavily leveraged shirts, and millions are now paying for this unwanted privilege by losing their jobs.

Millions of pensioners and near-pensioners, meanwhile, are paying for the boom, bust and bailout through decimated pension pots and non-existent savings rates.

And as for the young….well, goodness knows what they will do to pay for this all in years to come.

It is a clear redistribution of wealth, from the prudent ranks of middle England to the mega wealthy, from the rest of the UK to the south east. And it really isn’t fair.

And it was sold to us on the lie that we really had no other choice but to bail the banks out as functioning private institutions, and that we would all share the pain together.
The first one was never true, as the rapid decline of the economy has already shown, and now it looks as though the second one was a bit of a porky too.

We should remember all of this the next time a bank or financial institution hits the skids, as it surely will.

First, there is – as those on both the political left and right acknowledge – a strong case for letting the company in question crash and burn, stepping in only to protect the innocent, particularly retail depositors.

The billions saved on trying to repair banks’ busted balance sheets, meanwhile, could then be used to fight the recession in other ways, for example through tax cuts aimed at middle England and the elderly, or through properly-costed fiscal stimuli.

And we could also get on with the business of building a new and properly functioning banking model, rather than papering over the cracks of a fundamentally broken one.
http://www.citywire.co.uk/personal/-...=336593&Page=1
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Old April 14th, 2009, 12:28 PM   #9
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Old April 14th, 2009, 01:02 PM   #10
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Yeah, let the banks fail, that would have solved all our problems!
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Old April 14th, 2009, 01:55 PM   #11
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I work for one of the bailed out banks.

What an absolute heap of shite that article is, written by someone without the slightest clue of how economies work.

So, we let a bank go bust, and the major investors lose all their money meaning that foreign investment banks lose all confidence in all UK banking system and immediately pull all of their money out in case they are the last depositors left as all the other investors run scared.

Not only would you have a run on a single bank, but the entire banking systems would collapse, as would the currency (Zimbabwe style) and we would all be eating out of soup kitchens before you can say bankers bailout.
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Old April 14th, 2009, 02:20 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M€tr0l1nk View Post
I work for one of the bailed out banks.

What an absolute heap of shite that article is, written by someone without the slightest clue of how economies work.

So, we let a bank go bust, and the major investors lose all their money meaning that foreign investment banks lose all confidence in all UK banking system and immediately pull all of their money out in case they are the last depositors left as all the other investors run scared.

Not only would you have a run on a single bank, but the entire banking systems would collapse, as would the currency (Zimbabwe style) and we would all be eating out of soup kitchens before you can say bankers bailout.
Well said, that man. I can't believe how stupid some people are thinking that the government could let the financial system to collapse - it's somewhat different to a car factory!
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Old April 14th, 2009, 03:06 PM   #13
hoody
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I don't think the article is wholly pointed to letting the financial markets collapse, but just to serve as a reminder that there are people that really do need help. At the moment the banks are not lending money and with those out of work what options are there?
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Old April 14th, 2009, 03:23 PM   #14
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How about not wasting loads of money on a pointless VAT cut...
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Old April 14th, 2009, 03:36 PM   #15
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hoody - as ever the article is very good at saying what is wrong and gives no idea what to do as an alternative.

Do you want us to nationalise loss making industries and continue to produce stuff that no one wants?

How about a car scrappage fund that pays people to scrap their old car and to replace it with a new car, almost certainly built abroad?

Instead of saying what is wrong, try saying what needs to happen to fix it!

Letting the banks go bust is clearly not it.
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Old April 14th, 2009, 03:40 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i_like_concrete View Post
How about not wasting loads of money on a pointless VAT cut...
I agree with that, we couold have had some serious infrastructure investment with that money which would help ian awful lot in the long term.
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Old April 14th, 2009, 03:51 PM   #17
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VAT is likely to be 20% when it's put back up in December.
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Old April 14th, 2009, 03:57 PM   #18
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Indeed, I wonder if those that claim that is being lowered to 15% has had no effect will hold the same view when it is raised to 20%?
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Old April 14th, 2009, 04:02 PM   #19
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I also wonder how many businesses that didn't introduce the price cut will put 5% on all their prices...
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Old April 14th, 2009, 04:06 PM   #20
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Urm, was that not the idea?

Those businesses that could afford to pass the cut on could if they chose to, those who wanted to add it to their profits and risk losing customers to other companies could pocket the money, reducing the chances of going bankrupt?

The whole idea of the VAT cut was to put an extra £12bn into the retail sector, a sector that was / is massively struggling.
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