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Old September 9th, 2009, 03:56 PM   #241
ruready1000
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Underground High-Speed Internet: Testing WiMAX in Seoul Subways

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SEOUL, South Korea—Here in the U.S., ultrafast "4G" WiMAX mobile networks and their promise of rip-roaring speeds and anywhere accessibility are still the stuff of legend—distant dreams for consumers saddled by the subpar service of most 3G networks. Sure, Clearwire has installed the technology, which combines the speed of Wi-Fi with the accessibility of mobile networks, in test cities such as Baltimore and Atlanta, but few customers have bothered to check out the next-gen networks, and even fewer devices actually support them. So it's something of an eye-opener to get a firsthand look at a location where WiMAX networks are up and running to their full potential: Seoul.

The South Korean capital is blanketed with mobile WiMAX coverage (although the Koreans call it WiBro—short for "wireless broadband"). This means that there is nary a nook or cranny that, given the right hardware, can't handle a device's heaviest broadband demands. And that includes the city's sprawling subway system (surprising, since subways in most American cities are notorious cellular dead zones). In the subway here, WiBro antennas are spread out at 300- to 400-meter intervals in the tunnels and at the stations. It was here that we surfed the Web on WiMAX-enabled laptops (the connection came to an off-the-shelf netbook, courtesy of a WiBro USB modem) while sitting sandwiched between commuters.

Even while underground and moving at subway speeds, the connection was clear and consistent. As I journeyed through the Seoul underground, I took a number of data-speed measurements using speedtest.net, and the readings consistently showed download speeds of above 4 megabits per second, and upload speeds of above 1 Mbps (good luck getting that with your 3G phone, and good luck getting ANY data connection on a subway in the States). This speed was virtually the same whether I was standing on the station platform or riding through the underground. In all, the connection was good enough that it allowed me to watch high-definition YouTube videos at full-screen, without any buffering or obvious frame-rate issues.

So why does the data network of the Seoul subway matter to us in the U.S.? On one hand, it's not exactly fair to compare Korea's technological infrastructure with ours. The Korean capital and its centralized, tech-obsessed population have long been a testbed for local electronics companies such as Samsung and LG to release cutting-edge products before they reach the rest of the world. On the other hand, it's important to take note of the enormous gap between the technological ceiling of our best smartphones, and what sort of performance the data networks they run on are able to deliver. Apple's iPhone, in particular, is notorious for the choking effect its insatiable appetite for data has had on AT&T's 3G networks. The result is molasses-like Web browsing, choppy mobile streaming video, and the need for carriers to block certain data-heavy applications or force them to operate only on Wi-Fi networks (the Wi-Fi-only Sling Mobile iPhone application comes to mind).

Even though mobile carriers are busy upgrading their networks to meet the demands of smartphones, this problem is simply not going to go away as long as we rely on the current networks. It's going to take the speed and capacity of the 4G WiMAX networks, and its sister technology, LTE, for our top-end phones to deliver the Internet-anywhere experience they are capable of producing. Rumor has it that Apple's waiting for the widespread rollout of these services before releasing a long-awaited Verizon version of the iPhone. But if our 4G networks are going to produce an experience anywhere near as satisfying as my WiMAX-fueled ride through the Seoul subway (and for that, the U.S. networks would have to break down some infrastructure as well as speed barriers), it's going to be one awesome experience.

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Old September 9th, 2009, 03:59 PM   #242
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Seoul Subways Have a Few Downsides

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Park Geum-seong is tired of the long walks to the end of the subway station platform.

The 75-year-old waits patiently on the Yaksu subway platform with his wife, but they have been pushed to the end of the deserted corridor just so they could reach the elevator.

"They're only at the very front or back of the platforms," Park said. "So it's somewhat uncomfortable" to walk the long distance.

Seoul's subway is one of the world's largest and busiest rapid transit systems, catering to more than 8 million passengers daily. The subway is run by four different companies. Tokyo, the most heavily trafficked system, is operated by two entities.

Kim Yun-gu, the manager of the lost and found center for Lines No. 3 and 4, said that passengers searching for lost articles can get confused by the multiple office locations run by separate management.

"It can be frustrating for people," Kim said. "Web sites of the operators are all separate as well."

KORAIL manages the lines that lead to satellite cities, while Seoul Metro and the Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation oversee the largest majority. Seoul Metro Line 9 is responsible for the newest gold line.

Two new lines are under construction, to be managed by the Shin Bundang Line and Yongin Light Rail Corporations.

Each office keeps separate statistics that must be combined for a complete overview of the subway system. But even with the various management companies, the subway system functions seamlessly, though some updates could be used.

Alberto Mello, a Brazilian who has lived in South Korea for the past two years as a cook, said Seoul's subway system is as easy to use as the one in Rio de Janeiro, which has two lines compared with the 11 here. One key difference is the method of exits. While South Korea uses numbers for each, Brazil marks entrances with street names and numbers.

The use of multiple exits can be confusing when there are too many, according to New Zealander Gillian Higgins, an English teacher at a public school. But she finds the system to be cleaner and more efficient overall than others she's been on.

"It's surprisingly easy to use and everything's in English," Higgins said. She has ridden the subway in both Shanghai and Tokyo, where she said the lack of English signs and crowds could make for a "horrible" experience.

While subway systems around the world have their pros and cons, directional markings seems to be a recurring complaint.

The London Underground, the world's first subway system, indicates direction by using the terms "northbound" and "southbound." Though this works fairly well most of the time, it can become ambiguous when applied to the Circle line, which loops around the city center.

In Seoul, figuring out which direction to travel often proves problematic, because most of the signs' direction cues are the major station stops. Unless one knows where all the most important locations are, a map must be consulted.

In France, the Paris Metro indicates direction by simply referring to the end terminals of each line. This avoids the ambiguous northbound and southbound dilemma of east-to-west lines, while providing a consistent standard.

But for all its discomforts, Seoul's subway system satisfies most of its riders.

Kim Jeong-hwan, a press officer for Seoul Metro, said there are no plans to change the overall design of the subway system and its stations, although they are always looking for more ways to make it friendlier for the disabled and children.

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Old September 10th, 2009, 07:53 AM   #243
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I'm jealous of the 4G network...does it really work as well as the article says? Is it free to use?

I didn't know 4 companies operated the Seoul Metro system; for that reason, how accurate are the ridership numbers posted over the past few days? Do it double count people transferring from a different companies line?

By the way, referring to the above article, the Tokyo subway is now controlled by one company (Tokyo Metro absorbed Toei recently) and there is plenty of English (and Korean) written on signs here.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 02:46 PM   #244
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
I'm jealous of the 4G network...does it really work as well as the article says? Is it free to use?
I've searched some bolgs and many of peoples say it works well. And of it's not free of course. You have to sign up some service to use it.

Quote:
I didn't know 4 companies operated the Seoul Metro system; for that reason, how accurate are the ridership numbers posted over the past few days? Do it double count people transferring from a different companies line?
Even if the Seoul Metro are operated by four companies, Seoul Metropolitan Area has an integrated fare system for public transportation. About ridership every companies provides on-boarding and off-boarding numbers, but Seoul Metro co.(Line1~Line4), including on-boarding and off-boarding numbers,, offers transferring numbers too and adds it to the ridership.

Quote:
By the way, referring to the above article, the Tokyo subway is now controlled by one company (Tokyo Metro absorbed Toei recently) and there is plenty of English (and Korean) written on signs here.
Yeah my experience says the same thing. I had no problem to use the subway in Japan even if I don't know Japanese.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 03:06 PM   #245
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Seoul Subway Annual Ridership

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Line 1 ~ Line 4 includes on-boarding + transferring, Line 5~ Line 8 includes only on-boarding.
Line 9 opened this year, so no data is available.



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This data includes on-boarding only.
Janghang Line opened Dec. 15, 2008, so it shows low figures.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 03:13 PM   #246
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Daily Ridership on Each Station (2008)

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All of this data includes on-boarding + transferring.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 03:18 PM   #247
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Daily Ridership on Each Station (2008)

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


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image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


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This data includes on-boarding only.
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Old September 12th, 2009, 07:30 AM   #248
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Geumcheon-gu Office Station

Geumcheon-gu office station, formerly Siheung station, is the junction where Gyeongbu conventional railway and Gyeongbu high-speed railway is divided. The name of station was changed, when Geumcheon-gu office was built nearby Siheung station, from Siheung station to Geumcheon-gu office. Trains of Seoul subway Line 1 and Gwangmyeong shuttle stop at this station but other trains are just passing by.

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Geumcheon-gu office station

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Platform for subway

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Tracks in the direction of Seoul

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Gwangmyeong Shuttle train on platform

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KTX is passing by

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Mugunghwa class train is passing by

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Gwangmyeong shuttle train is entering underground high-speed track, which is linked to Gwangmyeong KTX station. On the left is Gyeongbu conventional railway track.

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Seoul subway Line 1 train is arriving.

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Old September 12th, 2009, 07:34 AM   #249
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Watch your step, Seoul wants you walking right

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It’s just a step to the right, or so Seoul Metropolitan Government thinks.

Signs encouraging people to walk on the right on escalators and moving walkways in the capital’s subway system will displayed as part of a City Hall campaign starting on Oct. 1.

The project will cost 550 million won ($450,081), according to Jeon Gwang-hyeon, an official at the transportation bureau with the city government.

The rationale is that most people in Seoul are not lefties.

“It’s comfortable to keep to the right on roads because most people are right-handed,” said Shin Yong-mok, a senior official at the same bureau.

“Exits in the airports and pedestrian crossings are built for people walking on the right. When people walk on the right side they go 1.2 to 1.7 times faster.”

The move follows a plan put forward by the central government in April to revise laws related to pedestrian traffic.

The 88-year-old law requires pedestrians in Korea to walk on the left, but the government wants to change the custom in line with international practice.

According to data provided by Ministry of Land, 88.3 percent of Koreans are right-handed and 73 percent prefer to walk on the right, saying keeping to the left goes against natural human instinct.

Many people, the ministry said, complain they feel so uncomfortable walking on the left they bump into others. Seoul City Hall said it will switch the directions of 1,109 escalators in 163 subway stations on lines No. 1 through 9. Twenty moving walkways in six subway stations will also be changed.

To help pedestrians to get accustomed to the new system, the city government said it will not initiate wholesale changes at first. Less crowded subway stations will be dealt with first, from the middle of September. Under the plan, the city government will also change signs leading to ticket gates in subway stations to accommodate walkers on the right.

And direction lines that lead commuters to catch subway transfers will also be changed. To reduce confusion, helpers will be on hand near escalators and moving walkways, according to city officials.

There will also be broadcasts and banners hammering home the message for anyone who fails to comply.

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Old September 16th, 2009, 05:18 AM   #250
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Seoul Subway

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images from titicat at flickr.com
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Old September 16th, 2009, 05:19 AM   #251
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Seoul Subway

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Old September 16th, 2009, 05:35 AM   #252
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Seoul Subway

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Old September 21st, 2009, 06:07 PM   #253
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Transportation Card to Be Used Nationwide From 2014

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From 2014, one transportation card will be used for all means of public transportation.

The Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs said Wednesday that the one-card system will be adopted in five years, enabling holders to use it for subways, buses and railways as well as to pay expressway tolls across the country.

Currently, users have to buy separate transportation cards when they travel from one region to another. The current cards can be used for buses and subways.

A public hearing was held to promote the one-card system and listen to a variety of public and expert opinions for a smoother launch.

The new system is being pushed following user complaints that they have to buy new cards when they travel outside metropolitan areas, for instance, or have to pay heavy fares in cash.

In the hearing, a detailed plan for the introduction of the system was explained, while Seoul National University's lab made a report about the progress it is making for the implementation of the so-called "one-card all-pass" system.

A scanner to read the cards, which will be installed across the country when the new system debuts, was also unveiled.

The ministry is planning to finalize all key details for the one-card system before the end of the year. Starting in 2013, the scanners will be installed in stages across the country so the new system can be set up accordingly.

"All infrastructure will be in place by 2013 so the one-card system can be implemented beginning in 2014," a ministry official said.

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Old September 22nd, 2009, 09:11 AM   #254
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Seoul Subway Trains

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images from 사자나미
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Old September 22nd, 2009, 09:12 AM   #255
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Seoul Subway Trains

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Old September 22nd, 2009, 09:13 AM   #256
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Seoul Subway Trains

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Old September 25th, 2009, 07:28 AM   #257
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so impressive!!!!!!
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Old October 1st, 2009, 03:25 PM   #258
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http://www.railway-technology.com/projects/seoul-metro/

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Seoul Metropolitan Subway, South Korea

Key Data
Total Number of Lines
Ten
Operations Began
15 Aug 1974
Maximum line speed
80km/h (50mph)
Operators
Seoul Metropolitan Subway Corporation, Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation, Veolia and Korail

Seoul metropolitan subway in South Korea is the most widely used rapid railway transport system in the world, featuring ten subway lines. The system serves nearly ten million inhabitants of the capital city, Seoul, and the provinces of Gyeonggi, Incheon and northern Chungnam. The total length of the subway line is about 287km (179.4 miles) of which 70% is underground. The subway has 291 stations.

The lines are operated by four companies – Seoul Metropolitan Subway (Seoul Metro), Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit (SMRT), Korail (Korea National Railroad) and Metro 9. Line 1 operations were initiated by Korail in 1974. The company's operations later expanded to lines 2, 3 and 4. SMRT was formed in 1994 and operates lines 5, 6, 7 and 8.

A new 25.5km section of the subway, line 9, was opened in 2009 to connect Gimpo Airport with Sinnonhyeon in south-east Seoul. It serves 25 stations.

Seoul subway line 9 project


Seoul subway line 9, which will run east along the south bank of the Han River, is planned to open in three phases. The line will connect Gimpo Airport with line 5 and with AREX, a private railway line.

The section will have three tracks to carry express trains in both directions and will pass through nine stations. The line also has six transfer stations for lines 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7. It will run four-car Hyundai-Rotem trains at speeds of 33km/h for local-stopping trains and 47km/h for express trains, allowing passengers to reach Gimpo from Gangnam in under 30 minutes.

The second section of the subway line 9 that will connect the Olympic Stadium station with Sinnonhyeon, and is scheduled for completion in 2013. The third section that will connect the stadium to Bangi-dong will be completed by 2015.

Subway lines are colour coded for easy identification. The colour coding system along with signs, written in both Korean and English, helps passengers to identify the lines and guides them the lines in appropriate direction.

The transfer points and upcoming stations are announced through pre-recorded voices in Korean and English.

Operation and funding


"Seoul metropolitan subway line 1 was built during 1971-74 and opened to public on 15 August 1974."

The project has been awarded to a consortium led by the railway system provider Hyundai Rotem. Veolia Transport Korea, through its operation and maintenance company Seoul Metro 9, will operate line 9 for ten years. Veolia Transport has an 80% stake in Seoul Metro 9, while the remainder is held by Rotem.

The subway is being funded by the Macquarie Korea Infrastructure Fund (MKIF). It is the first private investment in the subway system. The company has made investments in the form of equity and subordinated loans. MKIF has a concession term of 30 years, starting from July 2009. An investment of 74.4bn won is expected to be invested in line 9.

Seoul Metropolitan Subway lines

Seoul metropolitan subway line 1 was built during 1971-74 and opened to public on 15 August 1974. Line 1 connects larger parts of the Seoul National Capital Area. It runs through the central regions of Seoul city, Incheon station in the south-west, Soyosan Station in the north-east and Sinchang station in the south. Train service is frequently available between Guro, Yongsan, Seoul, Cheongnyangni, Uijeongbu, Dongducheon and Soyosan. The trains have split stations between Byeongjeom and Cheonan in the south and Incheon in the west.

Line 2 was built between 1978 and 1984. It is the longest circular subway line in the world measuring 60.2km. It is also the most heavily used subway line in Seoul. Line 2 connects the central parts of Seoul city. Yongdu Station, which opened on 20 October 2005, was the first station of the Seoul subway system to have operating platform screen doors.

Line 3 was built between 1980 and 1993. The line connects south-eastern Seoul, Gangnam and the north-western end of Seoul to the city centre. Ilsan line and line 3 operate as one combined line.

Line 4 was completed in 1994. The long line connects the north-east to the south-west areas through the old city centre, the Seoul National Capital Area. The line divides into the Ansan and Gwacheon Lines.

Line 5 is the only subway line in Seoul to cross under the Han River and is an important east-west link. The line connects Gimpo International Airport, the Youido business area, downtown Seoul and the Gangdong residential districts. It was constructed between 1990 and 1996 and is the longest fully underground subway line measuring 52.4km.
"Seoul subway's transfer points and upcoming stations are announced through pre-recorded voices in Korean and English."

Line 6 is a u-shaped subway line that passes through northern Seoul. A 4km section of line 6 was opened on 7 Aug 2000. Another 27km service was started on 15 December 2000. The line measures 35.1km and is represented in 'brown'. Parts of line 6 are one-directional.

The 46.9 km Line 7 is a north-south line that connects Gangnam directly with northern parts of Seoul without touching the city centre. The line was built between 1990 and 1996 and began operations in 2000.

Line 8 connects the south-eastern parts of Seoul with the satellite city of Songnam. The 17.7km line was completed in 1999.

Bundang Line runs from south-eastern Seoul through northern Seongnam and extends to northern end of Yongin. It is operated by Korail and was opened in September 1994.

Jungang Line is also operated by Korail. The line connects Cheongnyangni with Gyeongju in eastern Seoul. Another line operated by Korail is Gyeongui Line and was opened in 1906. The line became part of the Seoul subway on 1 July 2009.

Ticketing

Seoul Subway deployed reusable RFID single-journey ticketing technology on 8 July 2009. Paper tickets are being replaced by RFID smart cards called single journey tickets. The RFID cards containing ST's SRT512 contactless memory chip technology can be reused. Reusing tickets will save costs and will be environmentally friendly.

Seoul metro future

The Suseo and Garak Market line 8 is to be extended by 3km to connect to Ogeum of Line 5 by 2010.

Line 6 will be extended to the east to connect to the Gyeongchun Line enabling transfers, while line 7 will be extended to connect to Incheon subway on line 1 by 2010. The 9.8km extension with nine stations is aimed to relieve traffic congestion in northern Incheon and western Seoul. Line 8 will extend to the north of the Han River to Guri station.
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Old October 9th, 2009, 06:11 AM   #259
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Originally Posted by ruready1000 View Post
Seoul Subway Annual Ridership (from 2001 to 2008)

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line No.2 is overwhelming still more and more.. stunning..


and,, line No.6 really looks vacant relatively than No.2 actually.
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Old October 9th, 2009, 06:16 AM   #260
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Daily Ridership on Each Station (2008)

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This data includes on-boarding only.
Hwajeong is the busiest, unexpected !
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