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Old May 30th, 2010, 12:24 AM   #381
TheKorean
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I see. So its a replacement for Mugunhwa class trains.

Kinda like Metro North will use same locomotives that Amtrak uses? Sinchang-Seoul Nooriro service is a commuter rail service but otherwise rest of Nooriro are intercity services.
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Old May 30th, 2010, 09:13 AM   #382
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Quote:
You can take pictures of trains or stations, mostly without permission from staffs, if you don't walk along the track or don't enter into restricted areas.
That's good to know. So basically like in Japan, and better than the USA, where you may be seen as a terrorist and subject to harassment, even if you are on public property.

I like the Nooriro trains too, I see that they are built to serve both low and high level platforms.
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Old May 30th, 2010, 08:04 PM   #383
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKorean View Post
I see. So its a replacement for Mugunhwa class trains.

Kinda like Metro North will use same locomotives that Amtrak uses? Sinchang-Seoul Nooriro service is a commuter rail service but otherwise rest of Nooriro are intercity services.
What's Metro North?

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
That's good to know. So basically like in Japan, and better than the USA, where you may be seen as a terrorist and subject to harassment, even if you are on public property.

I like the Nooriro trains too, I see that they are built to serve both low and high level platforms.
Yes it's one of the advantage of Nooriro that's built to serve both platforms.
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Old May 30th, 2010, 08:18 PM   #384
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Incheon Maglev starts test operation on test track

Quote:

image hosted on flickr


South Korea launched test-operations of a magnetic levitation train on Monday, marking a major step toward commercializing faster and more eco-friendly transport service at the nation's main gateway, the government said.

The operation started after unveiling a test-version maglev train, which will be put into commercial service by 2013, on a 6.11 kilometer rail to be established at the Incheon International Airport, according to the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs.

Maglev trains use a powerful magnetic field to suspend them above rails, enabling them to travel faster than conventional ones. The train can carry up to 180 passengers and run at a top speed of 110km per hour, according to the ministry.

The test operation came after the government launched a project in 2006 to commercialize maglev train service for citizens living in and around the Seoul metropolitan area. A total of 450 billion won (US $ 404 million) was set aside for the project. (PNA/Yonhap) LOR/utb
source
Quote:
Korea will operate unmanned magnetic levitation trains in Incheon International Airport from 2013, becoming the latest country after Japan to commercialize the next generation transportation system.

The Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs said Monday that it will finish constructing a 6.1 kilometer railway by 2012 within the country's main airport and begin running unmanned magnetic levitation trains that will travel at 110 kilometers per hour. The ministry also unveiled a prototype of the train.

As one of Korea's state-funded research and development (R&D) projects, the government decided in 2006 to invest 450 billion won ($400 million) into developing the magnetic trains and railway tracks by 2012. Countries like Japan and Germany have been active in maglev research as an alternative to today's wheeled mass transit systems.

All the technologies have been developed by local entities, including the Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials and Rotem. The institute and Rotem, a local subway train producer, have been jointly developing Korea's next generation mass transport system.

Maglev trains, which are suspended in the air above specially designed tracks, are propelled by a linear motor that uses the repulsive and attractive forces of magnetism.

Because there is no physical contact between the vehicle and the track, the maglev system has many advantages ― it can travel at very high speeds with reasonable energy consumption and at low noise levels.

The futuristic transportation system had its debut in the early 1980s, but economic limitations have pose stumbling blocks to its full-fledged commercialization.

``We will continue to work hard to successfully introduce the maglev system over the next two years and launch a trial service in 2013 at Incheon International Airport. If the operation proves to be successful, many municipal administrations will rush to bring in this transport system to improve their mass transit,'' a ministry official said.

He also said the ministry will seek to cut the costs of building the maglev train tracks to as low as 40 billion won per kilometer. ``If so, the transport scheme will be economically feasible. We will then try to export our maglev trains and related technologies to other countries.''
source

news clip about trial run



maglev train clip by Center For Maglev Program (in korean)
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Old June 1st, 2010, 01:16 AM   #385
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BGM of Korean Metros
(T = Transfer Station, L = Last Station)
  • Korail Line 1, 3, 4, Bundang (T / L)
    Korail Gyeongui, Jungang Line (T / L)
  • Seoul Metro Line 1~4 (T / L)
  • SMRT Line 5~8 (T / L)
  • Metro9 Line 9 (T / L)
  • Incheon Line 1 (T / L)
  • Daejeon Line 1 (T / L)
  • Daegu Line 1~2 (T / L)
  • Gwangju Line 1 (T / L)
  • Busan Line 1 (T / L)
    Busan Line 2 (T / L)
    Busan Line 3 (T / L)
  • source


Actual Announcements of Korean Metros
(T = Transfer Station, L = Last Station)
  • Korail Line 1, 3, 4, Bundang (T / L)
    Korail Gyeongui, Jungang Line (T / L)
  • Seoul Metro Line 1~4 (T / L)
  • SMRT Line 5~8 (T / L)
  • Metro9 Line 9 (T / L)
  • Incheon Line 1 (T / L)
  • Daejeon Line 1 (T / L)
  • Daegu Line 1~2 (T / L)
  • Gwangju Line 1 (T / L)
  • Busan Line 1 (T / L)
    Busan Line 2 (T / L)
    Busan Line 3 (T / L)


The Whole Announcements of Gwangju Subway Line 1
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:09 AM   #386
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Quote:
What's Metro North?
A commuter railroad serving New York City and Connecticut. Lots of old rolling stock, but recently Kawasaki Heavy has begun supplying new cars (M-8). Nothing special, but we're talking about North American rail transit here.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:43 PM   #387
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^Its very useful though. Very accessible, convenient.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 07:47 AM   #388
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
A commuter railroad serving New York City and Connecticut. Lots of old rolling stock, but recently Kawasaki Heavy has begun supplying new cars (M-8). Nothing special, but we're talking about North American rail transit here.
I thought Metro North was some korean metro which I never heard of. Thank you for clearing it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKorean View Post
I see. So its a replacement for Mugunhwa class trains.

Kinda like Metro North will use same locomotives that Amtrak uses? Sinchang-Seoul Nooriro service is a commuter rail service but otherwise rest of Nooriro are intercity services.
Whether Nooriro is a commuter rail or not may vary depending on the definition, but I don't consider Nooriro as a commuter rail servicce, because :

1. Nooriro will replace Mugunghwa class train which is basically inter-city train.
2. The fare difference. When you use Nooriro between Seoul and Shinchang, it's 7,300 won but if you use subway line 1 it's 3000 won. When there were Korail commuter trains here and there some years ago(now practically non-exsistent) the fare was very inexpensive.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 08:37 AM   #389
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Singing in a train on Jungang Line (Hannam station to Seobinggo station), source



Singing in Oksu station on Jungang Line, source
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 10:52 PM   #390
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruready1000 View Post
I thought Metro North was some korean metro which I never heard of. Thank you for clearing it.




Whether Nooriro is a commuter rail or not may vary depending on the definition, but I don't consider Nooriro as a commuter rail servicce, because :

1. Nooriro will replace Mugunghwa class train which is basically inter-city train.
2. The fare difference. When you use Nooriro between Seoul and Shinchang, it's 7,300 won but if you use subway line 1 it's 3000 won. When there were Korail commuter trains here and there some years ago(now practically non-exsistent) the fare was very inexpensive.
In US commuter trains are much more expensive than subway.

Are you saying that service will be extended from Sinchang or there will be other lines where Nooriro will serve?
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Old June 14th, 2010, 06:55 AM   #391
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Gyeongchun Line

Thanks for everything, Ruready! I registered just to be able to reply to you, to say thanks for all the info, and to ask more questions!
Do you know when the Gyeongchun Line will open? I know it is this year, but when? Also, where will the interchange stations be with existing lines? I think there is an interchange at the moment at Hwarangdae to get to Chuncheon, but it isnt very convenient, and I don't know if there will be new stations being built. Also, do you know when the Airport Express will extend to central Seoul? I really want that section to be open!
Again, thanks for all your knowledge - as a foreigner who loves Seoul's transport system, I am really grateful.
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Old June 15th, 2010, 01:23 PM   #392
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Originally Posted by martinw600 View Post
Thanks for everything, Ruready! I registered just to be able to reply to you, to say thanks for all the info, and to ask more questions!
Do you know when the Gyeongchun Line will open? I know it is this year, but when? Also, where will the interchange stations be with existing lines? I think there is an interchange at the moment at Hwarangdae to get to Chuncheon, but it isnt very convenient, and I don't know if there will be new stations being built. Also, do you know when the Airport Express will extend to central Seoul? I really want that section to be open!
Again, thanks for all your knowledge - as a foreigner who loves Seoul's transport system, I am really grateful.
You're welcome, marinw600.

Quote:
Do you know when the Gyeongchun Line will open? I know it is this year, but when?
The exact date of openning day is not announced. I think they will announce the exact date one month before the openning.

Quote:
I think there is an interchange at the moment at Hwarangdae to get to Chuncheon, but it isnt very convenient, and I don't know if there will be new stations being built.
Gyeongchun Line is currently connected to Gyeongwon Line, but new Gyeongchun Line to come this year will be connected to Jungang Line. In result there are some adjustments. The terminal station for normal trains will be Shinsangbong on Jungang Line(Shinsang station is being newly built on Jungang Line as a transfer station to Line 7), but express trains expected to be launched next year will start and end at Yongsan station.(Stop stations are not decided yet) Anyway we will know the exact information when Gyeongchun Line is on operation.

Quote:
Also, do you know when the Airport Express will extend to central Seoul? I really want that section to be open!
Incheon Airport Railroad(A'REX) Phase 2 between Gimpo Airport and Seoul Station is expected to be openned late this year, but like Gyeongchun Line, the exact date is not known yet. As far as I know, the construction is already completed.
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Old June 15th, 2010, 09:31 PM   #393
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A guide and walkthrough of Seoul's subway system

Hello everyone,

This is my first post here. I've spent a couple of hours working on this, and I hope it is of use the next time you are in Seoul.

A Guide and Walkthrough of Public Transportation in Seoul and Incheon, South Korea
Part I: Subway

Introduction:

Seoul's massive subway system is one of the most widely used subway systems in the world. With over 2 billion annual riders as of 2009, it is only behind Tokyo and Moscow in terms of usage, and ahead of New York City. The operation of its 13 lines is split between five different entities. The breakdown is as follows:

- Seoul Metro (Lines 1, 2, 3, 4)
- Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation (Lines 5, 6, 7, 8)
- Metro 9/Veolia Transportation (Line 9)
- Korail (Gyeongui Line, Jungang Line, Bundang Line, Parts of Line 1, 3, 4)
- Incheon Metro (Incheon Subway Line 1)

Key Facts:

Opening Date: August 15th, 1974 ( Line 1)
Annual Passengers: 2.0 billion (2009)
Busiest Line: Line 2 - 1,451,283 passengers per day
Busiest Station: Gangnam Station (Line 2) - 99,727 passengers per day
Oldest Line: Line 1 - Opened August 15, 1974
Newest Line: Line 9 - Opened July 24, 2009

In Numbers:

13 - Number of subway lines in the system
198.3 - Length of Line 1, the longest subway line in the system, and possibly the world.
3 hr 40 min - The amount of time it takes to get from one end of Line 1 to another - by far the longest journey in the system.
755 - Amount of kilometers the entire system covers

History (Rough translation from a Korean Wiki page):

Streetcars were the primary mode of public transportation in Seoul until 1968, when the system was shut down to make way for private automobiles. At this stage, a subway wasn't even in the planning stage until 1970, when the issue was brought up by Seoul's then newly-elected mayor, Yang Tek-sik. Despite opposition from the city's economic planners who cited the immense costs of constructing a subway system, Yang was eventually able to gain the approval of (then) president of South Korea, Park Chung-Hee.

As the city entered the 1970s, it faced a population boom as it has never seen before, with its population doubling between 1960 and 1970. The resulting surge in demand for public transportation put pressure on the city government to materialize the plans to build a subway line in the city. Construction finally began in April 1971, and South Korea's first underground railway opened on August 15th, 1974 between Seoul Station and Cheongnyangni (9.5km), directly linked to commuter rail lines to the neighboring cities of Incheon, and further south in Suwon (which would later become combined into Line no. 1).

Soon after the opening of the new subway line, Mayor Yang stepped down, and Koo Ja-Chun became mayor. At that time, three "core" districts of Seoul were under development, and mayor Koo believed that Seoul needed a second subway line that would connect all of those three "core" districts. This idea evolved into Line no. 2, now the longest circular subway line in the world, and also the busiest subway line in the entire country. Construction started on March 9th, 1978, and the first part of the line opened on October 31st, 1980, covering the eastern portion of the circle, with the last part of the circle being completed on May 22nd, 1984.

As budgetary pressures built up for the Seoul City Government and Central Government, the construction and operation of new subway lines was done under the direction of corporations. This spawned the Seoul Metropolitan Subway Corporation (now known as Seoul Metro). This company would later go on to construct and operate Line 3 and Line 4, both of which cut through the city diagonally. This company also took over the operation of Line 2, as well as the underground parts of Line 1.

Following the construction of the four subway lines, Seoul and its surrounding areas faced even more rapid urbanization and grew to be the second largest metropolitan area in the world, after Tokyo. Four subway lines were simply not enough, and expansion of the system was necessary to solve many of the transportation problems the city was facing at the time.

As a result, Lines 3 and 4 were extended further south, and Lines 5, 6, 7 and 8 were created under the direction of a new company, as the Seoul Metropolitan Subway Corporation was heavily criticized for shortfalls in their management. Korail (the rail transport arm of the Korean Government) constructed the Ilsan and Gwacheon lines, which connected directly to
Line 3 and 4, respectively, as well as the Bundang line.

The area south of the Han River (the main river in Seoul), called Gangnam, was seeing an immense influx of wealth and commercialization. The area around Gangnam Station was bustling with traffic trying to squeeze by next to tall skyscrapers. Lines 2 and 7, which went through the area, was having a hard time coping with the congestion (the former of which saw up to a 225% congestion rate in some sections, during rush hours). Therefore, Line 9 was built, running between Lines 2 and 7. Line 9 is currently being run by a consortium that is majority-owned by Veolia Transport, and opened last July.

Today, Seoul's metropolitan subway system is comprised of 13 different subway lines, with a 14th, 15th and 16th coming within the next 5 years. It is, hands down, the fastest, most efficient and most reliable means of traveling within the city, as well as to its outlying areas. Clean trains, stations and plentiful amenities spoil its regular users and impress visitors
alike.

Lines:

Seoul Metro

Line 1
Opened: August 15, 1974
Soyosan-Incheon; Sinchang (a lot of trains are scheduled to terminate at other stops along the way)
Yongsan-Cheonan Express; Seoul Station-Cheonan Express; Yongsan-Dongincheon Express, Seongbuk-Soyosan Express
Length: 198.3km
Stations: 98
Average Daily Ridership: 1,353,485 (2006)
Signalling: ATS

Line 2
Opened: October 31st, 1980-May 22nd, 1984
City Hall-City Hall (Circular line);
Seongsu-Sinseoldong Branch
Sindorim-Kkachisan Branch
Length: 60.2km (Main line: 48.8km; Seongsu Branch: 5.4km; Sindorim Branch: 6km)
Stations: 54 (Main line: 44, Seongsu Branch: 5, Sindorim Branch: 5)
Average daily ridership: 1,451,283 (2006)
Signalling: ATS

Line 3
Opened: July 12th, 1985-February 18th, 2010 (extension)
Daehwa-Ogeum
Length: 57.4km
Stations: 43
Average Daily Ridership: 605,874 (2006)
Signalling: ATC

Line 4
Opened: April 20th, 1985-April 1st, 1994
Danggogae-Oido
Length: 70.5km
Stations: 48
Average Daily Ridership: 811,934 (2006)
Signalling: ATC

SMRT

Line 5
Opened: November 15th, 1995-December 30th, 1996
Banghwa-Sangil Dong; Macheon (splits into two)
Length: 52.3km
Stations: 51
Average Daily Ridership: 590,495 (2006)
Signalling: ATO

Line 6
Opened: August 7th, 2000-March 9th, 2001
Eungam-Bonghwasan
Length: 35.1km
Stations: 38
Average Daily Ridership: 296,205 (2006)
Signalling: ATO

Line 7
Opened: October 11th, 1996-August 1st, 2000 (further extension opening in March 2011)
Jangam-Onsu
Length: 46.9km
Stations: 42
Average Daily Ridership: 584,338 (2006)
Signalling: ATO

Line 8
Opened: November 23th, 1996-July 2nd, 1999
Amsa-Moran
Length: 17.7km
Stations: 17
Average Daily Ridership: 153,366 (2006)
Signalling: ATO

Metro9/Veolia

Line 9

Opened: July 24th, 2009 (further extensions in 2013 and 2015)
Gaehwa-Sinnonhyeon Local; Gimpo Airport-Sinnonhyeon Express
Length: 27km
Stations: 25
Average Daily Ridership: N/A
Signalling: ATO

Incheon Metro

Incheon Metro Line 1
Opened: October 6th, 1999-June 1st, 2009
Gyeyang-International Business District
Length: 29.4km
Stations: 29
Average Daily Ridership: 199,527 (2007O
Signalling: ATO

Korail

Jungang Line
Opened: December 16th, 2005-December 23th, 2009
Yongsan-Yongmun
Length: 51.5km
Stations: 26
Average Daily Ridership: 53,205
Signalling: ATS

Bundang Line
Opened: September 1st, 1994-December 24th, 2007 (extensions in 2011, 2012 and 2013)
Seolleung-Jukjeon
Length: 27.7km
Stations: 20
Signalling: ATC

Gyeongui Line
Opened: July 1st, 2009
Seoul Station-Munsan
Length: 46.3km
Stations: 20
Signalling: ATS

- Walkthrough -

Subway Stations are relatively easy to find in and around Seoul. They will normally have a large pole with the station name and number next to the entrance.


Typical Subway Station entrance

Once you enter the station, you will find screens that show information about the next trains to arrive at the station. Perhaps this is the time to decide if you want to run or not!


Information Display

But before you can go through the gates and board your train, you should make sure you have enough money in your fare card. If you don't have a fare card, you can buy a single-use

card from one of these machines:



Once you complete that process, you will go through one of these gates.


The gate closes like the one on the far left when an attempt is made to go through without a proper fare card.

Here's a video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YN_tEutEBDw

If you go through the gate only to realize that you won't have enough money to complete your trip, you don't have to worry, as these machines are at every station:




Here's a video that shows you how to load a fare card or device. Fare payment can be done through fare cards, credit cards with RFID chips, or with special cell phone fobs/ornaments.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HulvazPY6cQ

Once you go through the gates and head downstairs to the platform level, you will be able to make use of some nifty information.


This map shows you the approximate amount of time it takes to get to a certain station, as well as the best cars to be in to minimize transfer times.

Check the approximate position of the next train, so that you can get an idea of when your train will arrive.



Got some time? Why not have some refreshments?



Here's a video that shows some key features of a typical subway station in Seoul.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smScmvvqL0k

Most stations in Seoul feature Platform Screen Doors to prevent people from falling onto the tracks.


Once you board the train, you'll notice maps above each door. There are two kinds: the line map, and the system map.




Digital displays and train announcements made in both Korean and English will ensure that you do not miss your stop. Here's a video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEYs8FwLqV4

Once you reach your stop and go through the gates again, you may find it useful to view the neighborhood map, which are available in both printed and digital form.



Here's a video of the interactive touch screen map:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0L95rM76zo

Clear, bilingual signage and numbered exits make things much more convenient:


Visually impaired? These tiles with raised bumps should be able to guide you safely.


Many stations also feature elevators for those in wheelchairs. Stations that do not have them always feature these lifts instead:





Thanks for reading, and I hope it is some help if you ever plan to visit Seoul.

Last edited by hl7534; June 15th, 2010 at 10:54 PM.
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Old June 15th, 2010, 10:05 PM   #394
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Great job. Post more pics!
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Old June 15th, 2010, 10:36 PM   #395
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Great thread, all threads about metros should be this informative!

I was impressed to learn line 1 has almost 200km and NINETY-EIGHT stations whoa!

I'm also humbled how Seoul's metro opened just one month before Sao Paulo's (which opened on September 14, 1974) but Seoul made the right decision to expand the system dramatically while we in Sao Paulo have barely reached half of a good network (we have 350km and 150 stations).

What is the per-km cost of the Seoul metro?
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Old June 16th, 2010, 02:13 AM   #396
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Good job on the thread!

Can you show pictures of trains, and interiors?

Also, I assume the total 755km is referring to the entire rail system in Seoul? What is the length of the actual Metro?
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Old June 16th, 2010, 02:36 AM   #397
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinB View Post
Also, I assume the total 755km is referring to the entire rail system in Seoul? What is the length of the actual Metro?
Since the system is so integrated it is impossible to draw a line where the metro ends and the "suburban rail" start. Wiki says 314km but I don't think even the operators could give a definitive answer. It is all considered metro anyway.
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Old June 16th, 2010, 07:45 AM   #398
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gincan View Post
Since the system is so integrated it is impossible to draw a line where the metro ends and the "suburban rail" start. Wiki says 314km but I don't think even the operators could give a definitive answer. It is all considered metro anyway.
It seems that the Seoul Metro and Seoul MRT stay within the confines of the urban area, while Korail trains serve as the suburban and outer suburban/interurban subways.

Also, Korail has three subway lines all to itself, with two more to be added (Sin Bundang Line and Gyeongchun Line).
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Old June 16th, 2010, 04:06 PM   #399
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This is an official document from Korean government website (Minstry of Land, Transport and Martime Affairs).
I posted it at the previous page on this topic, but I will post it again for the convenience of forumers.

Korea Urban Transit (as of 2009)
image hosted on flickr


Korea Metropolitan Transit (as of 2009)
image hosted on flickr


Korea Urban Transit Under Construction (as of 2009)
image hosted on flickr


Korea Metropolitan Transit Under Construction (as of 2009)
image hosted on flickr


Source from Minstry of Land, Transport and Martime Affairs
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Old June 16th, 2010, 10:54 PM   #400
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Thank you for the impressive work that you submit, dear Korean forumers.
I recognize the seriousness and love of things well done so characteristic of Koreans.
You are tooo serious
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Rire ensemble de nos différences.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjwFcSRzO48
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