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Old July 24th, 2010, 02:19 PM   #221
Attus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaRoy View Post
Well, Wikipedia also mentions רויסווארדיין (Yiddish) :-)
Hehe, can you read it? It's about "Roisswardein", the German name with minor modifications :-)

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By the way, bilingualism also goes to the extreme sometimes when it is done by some regulation. Once somewhere I have seen a bilingual Romanian - Hungarian sign for Arad. It read "Arad - Arad".
:-D
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Old July 24th, 2010, 02:24 PM   #222
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Thanks God there is no problem with navigation cos of these double names. In Belgium they have always just one name before village but using 2 names of it (french/dutch). They are always changing and removing signs. The problem is when you check your map.

PS: I like these multi-culutral ares. : -) Nice to traveling there and see many names in different languages.
Belgium... I was there 15 or more years ago first time (and several times since then). In the Dutch part of the country every sings use the Dutch name of the towns, even for the towns which are actually located in the French part of Belgium. I saw the signs and was thinking, holding a map in my hand, what on earth can "Luik" mean. It was years later when I learned it was the Dutch name for Liége. Road signs are not really informative this way :-)
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Old July 24th, 2010, 02:46 PM   #223
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Yeah, Luik/Liege, most known example from Belgium.

They really like it, but I think the Germans look at it bit differently:

B/D border near Aachen.

By the way, Germans aren't far behind, sometimes:



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Old July 24th, 2010, 06:37 PM   #224
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All new signs in Germany all use the endonym. New signs say Arnhem and Nijmegen, not Arnheim and Nimwegen. The Netherlands did the same, signs say Köln. However, I have yet to see signs saying Liège (the only French-language city signed on Dutch motorways).
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Old July 24th, 2010, 07:40 PM   #225
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piotr71 View Post

They really like it, but I think the Germans look at it bit differently:

B/D border near Aachen.
I've seen "o" painted over on Belgian signs towards Luxembourg (and another ~bourg). Can't remember if it was in the German Speaking Community of Belgium, but rather not. It would have been an act by roaming Vandals.



(Vandals lived in present east Germany)
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Old July 26th, 2010, 03:37 PM   #226
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For a change, a road sign showing towns/cities in three countries, without a single exonym - all names in the original languages:

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Old July 26th, 2010, 04:08 PM   #227
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Yes, but then you'd need a schwa/vowel between 'r' and 's' (Trəst).
If I may correct you, Verso: I think the schwa should be after the T: Tərst.

I have also seen Trst written as Terst on old maps and documents, however this kind of spelling must be obsolete for I would say at least 100 years.
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Old July 26th, 2010, 05:04 PM   #228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LMB View Post
For a change, a road sign showing towns/cities in three countries, without a single exonym - all names in the original languages:

Where is this placed?
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Old July 26th, 2010, 05:23 PM   #229
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I think in Völklingen.
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Old July 26th, 2010, 05:28 PM   #230
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I asked because I thought it was in France, and that maybe German towns are written in German because there are no exonyms in French for these German towns...

... until I discovered that Saarbruecken is Sarrebruck in French
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Old July 26th, 2010, 05:57 PM   #231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by next_lift View Post
If I may correct you, Verso: I think the schwa should be after the T: Tərst.
It's 'Tərst' of course, but Ayceman said it's possible to pronounce 'Trst' without a single vowel by saying you don't need a schwa or some other vowel between 'T' and 'r', which is true, but then you'd need a schwa or another vowel between 'r' and 's' (Trəst, Trust etc.). You need a vowel, either between 'T' and 'r', or between 'r' and 's'.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 03:47 PM   #232
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You don't need any vowel in a word. Trills and fricatives can substitute the role of vowels. It is a bit weird, and only happens in a few languages. I pronounce it Târst (tɨrst - IPA or Tyrst - Polish phonetic or Тырст - Russian phonetic) so as to not complicate myself.
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Old August 10th, 2010, 07:35 PM   #233
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I didn`t know about any Slovak-Ukrainian signs in Eastern Slovakia but I found that picture today on a google.

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Old August 10th, 2010, 08:01 PM   #234
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The main linguistic issue on road signs around here is the English/welsh divide. Signs in England are in English only, signs in wales show bilingual versions of town names if the towns are in wales but for English towns only English is displayed.

So in Wales, Welsh towns will be shown as for example:

Cardiff/Caerdydd
Swansea/Abertawe
Wrexham/Wrecsam
Newtown/Drenewydd
Welshpool/Trallwng

But English cities will always be shown as:

London
Manchester
Liverpool
Chester
Shrewsbury

Never as

Llundain
Manceinion
Lerpwl
Caer
Yr Amwythig

Instruction signs are also bilingual in wales, white painted 'SLOW' warnings on English roads become 'SLOW ARAF' in Wales. The Welsh version sometimes appears first on signs in areas where Welsh is the majority language.

The only time we see bilingual Welsh signs in England is sometimes temporary warning signs at roadworks if the contractors are from wales or picked up the signs from a depot that serves both sides of the border.
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Old August 10th, 2010, 11:35 PM   #235
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OFF, Sorry :-)

Two Englishmen are visiting Wales. They see a town named as Twaynrgjhtwrtetrwnreywenr. They are very curious about the pronounciation so that they go to eat something and ask the waitress: "Please could you tell us, slow, articulated, what is the name of this place?". And she answers: "B-U-R-G-E-R K-I-N-G"
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Old August 10th, 2010, 11:49 PM   #236
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seem View Post
I didn`t know about any Slovak-Ukrainian signs in Eastern Slovakia but I found that picture today on a google.

Is there a Ukrainian-speaking population in the area, or is that for the benefit of Ukrainians passing through? (I notice the Cyrillic version ends differently than the Slovak, so it's not just a transliteration.)
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Old August 11th, 2010, 12:00 AM   #237
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I don`t know about any Ukrainan minority in this region, but it looks like there is some small community.
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Old August 11th, 2010, 12:01 AM   #238
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
Is there a Ukrainian-speaking population in the area, or is that for the benefit of Ukrainians passing through? (I notice the Cyrillic version ends differently than the Slovak, so it's not just a transliteration.)
well, it is not neccesserly that same place has exactly the same name in different languages, so it is not only about transliteration. it happens often.
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Old August 11th, 2010, 12:02 AM   #239
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It's not in the Ukrainian border region either. (Prešovský kraj)

According to Wikipedia, there is a 1% Ukrainian minority in the Prešov region, but Rokytovce has a population of only 185. However, the Medzilaborce District has a 45% Ukrainian / Ruthenian minority. So it sounds plausible.
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Old August 11th, 2010, 12:11 AM   #240
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Guys, I found more info about that by using some of Slovak words and google.

So there is not Ukrainian minority, it is a community of Rusyns in that village. According to Wikipedia in Slovakia we have a 24,201 Rusyns.

Btw, Chris Prešovský kraj is also border region but this village is near Polish border.
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