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Old August 11th, 2010, 03:06 AM   #241
ed110220
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Dru View Post
When I was in SA, I notice that in the Westcape province they use English and Afrikaans for the name Capetown. But they never use both names on one sign. It's very clear.

Capetown


Kaapstad


Stad - City
This is a sensible policy in my opinion. Signage should be clear, but that can't be the only consideration as even if a language group can understand another language they will understandably be upset if they have to read everything in another language in their own city or country.

Mainly either English or Afrikaans is used in and around Cape Town, but not usually both on the same sign, except for signs that can be read from both sides, where one is often used on the one side and the other on the other side.

It's not usually a problem because most places either have the same name or a very similar one in the two languages, though perhaps for tourists "Kaapstad" (Cape Town), "Stad" (City), "Lughawe" (Airport) etc may be confusing. Also the Afrikaans convention of writing road names as one word can be a bit strange to foreign eyes, like "Giel Bassonrylaan" (Giel Basson Drive).

My favourite is the sign on Beaufort West railway station that reads Beaufort Wes/t in an attempt to combine Beaufort West and Beaufort-Wes
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Old August 11th, 2010, 03:08 PM   #242
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Originally Posted by Verso View Post
It's 'Tərst' of course, but Ayceman said it's possible to pronounce 'Trst' without a single vowel by saying you don't need a schwa or some other vowel between 'T' and 'r', which is true, but then you'd need a schwa or another vowel between 'r' and 's' (Trəst, Trust etc.). You need a vowel, either between 'T' and 'r', or between 'r' and 's'.
this is not true. R has the role of vowel in Slovenian and Serbian as well.
For example srpska only ends with vowel so r serves as vowel.

Last edited by Bad_Hafen; August 11th, 2010 at 03:18 PM.
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Old August 11th, 2010, 03:21 PM   #243
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Originally Posted by Bad_Hafen View Post
this is not true. R has the role of vowel in Slovenian and Serbian as well.
For example srpska only ends with vowel so r serves as vowel.
I suppose the English spelling of that would be Surpska. (Americans wouldn't pronounce the U at all)
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Old August 11th, 2010, 04:13 PM   #244
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad_Hafen View Post
this is not true. R has the role of vowel in Slovenian and Serbian as well.
For example srpska only ends with vowel so r serves as vowel.
'R' is a consonant, the schwa (ə) between 'S' and 'r' is a vowel (Sərpska).
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Old August 11th, 2010, 09:29 PM   #245
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U svakom prirodnom jeziku, slog uključuje samoglasnike. U nekim jezicima u toj funkciji mogu stajati uz samoglasnike i glasovi koje se fonetički smatraju suglasnicima, kao r u srpskoj reči vrt

r je nosilac sloga, silabičan, pa stoji u funkciji samoglasnika

Pored pet stalnih samoglasnika (a, e, i, o, u) u nekim slučajevima i suglasnik r ima funkciju samoglasnika, tj. nosilac je sloga.
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Old August 11th, 2010, 10:17 PM   #246
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and why does it happen that consonant takes role of vowel? exactly because of schwa. try to find a word where "r" acts consonant in Bulgarian language
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Old August 11th, 2010, 11:16 PM   #247
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not very understandable Bad_Hafen
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Old August 12th, 2010, 06:35 AM   #248
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
Only Hungarians say Nagyvárad to Oradea. On any map (that was not printed in Hungary) you can find Oradea.
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Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
Just discovered that there is an Italian name for that place: Gran Varadino
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Originally Posted by KaaRoy View Post
Correct. Same with the German name. (Großwardein)
In Serbian (Serbocroatian) it is Veliki Varadin, since there is (Mali) Varadin in Serbia already.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 10:41 AM   #249
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Talking about linguistic issues, it looks like Russian often translates names phonetically instead of by the letter. However, they don't do this with Polish. They translate Łódź as Лодзь, not like вудщ or something, which is how you pronounce it. For example Houston is translated as Хьюстон, not Хоустон.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 11:18 AM   #250
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Talking about linguistic issues, it looks like Russian often translates names phonetically instead of by the letter. However, they don't do this with Polish. They translate Łódź as Лодзь, not like вудщ or something, which is how you pronounce it. For example Houston is translated as Хьюстон, not Хоустон.
that's often case in Serbian as well. they even do it with names. so, Majkl Džekson died in Los Endželes
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Old August 12th, 2010, 11:48 AM   #251
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that's often case in Serbian as well. they even do it with names. so, Majkl Džekson died in Los Endželes
I didn`t know about that, verz weird.

we just put "ová" when it is a female name

for example

Slovak Prime Minister - Iveta Radičová is in Croatian Iveta Radič
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Old August 12th, 2010, 11:53 AM   #252
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Slovak Prime Minister - Iveta Radičová is in Croatian Iveta Radič
In Italian we used to italianize foreign names until circa 1950s. Now we don't but some names are still italianized: Isacco Newton, Abramo Lincoln, Giorgio Washington
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Old August 12th, 2010, 12:04 PM   #253
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So there is not Ukrainian minority, it is a community of Rusyns in that village. According to Wikipedia in Slovakia we have a 24,201 Rusyns.
There are some Rusyns at the Polish side as well. Unfortunately the communists weren't exactly very friendly to them and a large number of Rusyns was resettled to the Western part of the country, but some still live in their homeland in mountains.

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Old August 12th, 2010, 12:44 PM   #254
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There are some Rusyns at the Polish side as well. Unfortunately the communists weren't exactly very friendly to them and a large number of Rusyns was resettled to the Western part of the country, but some still live in their homeland in mountains.
According to Wikipedia, we have a biggest community of Rusyns in Slovakia.

Quote:
Romania 7,000
Slovakia 24,201
Serbia 15,626
Ukraine 10,100
Croatia 2,337
Poland 5,800
Are there any Slovak sign/communities in Poland?

if I am sure I once saw a sign with Žilina/ Żylina on it.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 01:38 PM   #255
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that's often case in Serbian as well. they even do it with names. so, Majkl Džekson died in Los Endželes
I know it well... My sister's wedding was hold in Serbia (his husband is from Serbia, but ethnically Hungarian). Unfortunately the wedding's documents were printed using the Latin/English alphabet not the Cyrillic one, but using this strange way of spelling. Since both our family name and that of her husband has some specific letters, the official documents spell their names different way than they use it originally. My sister had a lot of problem with those documents in Hungarian public offices, officers usually did not beleive it is her name...
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Old August 12th, 2010, 01:41 PM   #256
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Originally Posted by seem View Post
I didn`t know about that, verz weird.

we just put "ová" when it is a female name

for example

Slovak Prime Minister - Iveta Radičová is in Croatian Iveta Radič
As long as you have this habit for Slovakian women, it doesn't matter :-) Some years ago a Hungarian sport team (FTC Budapest female handball team) had a match in Slovakia (Sal'a) and the speaker in the sport hall put this -ová to Hungarian players' names as well (I mean girls that are Hungarian both ethnically and by citizenship). It was weird, just like seeing Bridget Jonesová in a cinema's ad ;-)
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:02 PM   #257
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Czechs do it as well. It was Tina Turnerova whose image i saw on posters in Cesky Tesin several years ago.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:38 PM   #258
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Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
In Italian we used to italianize foreign names until circa 1950s. Now we don't but some names are still italianized: Isacco Newton, Abramo Lincoln, Giorgio Washington
I think in Spain they still do it sometimes. In the uk we only anglicise the Pope and Christopher Columbus.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:45 PM   #259
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I think in Spain they still do it sometimes. In the uk we only anglicise the Pope and Christopher Columbus.
Columbus is an evergreen: every language has its own version

We italianize English Royal Family members (Elizabeth is Elisabetta, Charles is Carlo), but strangely enough, William is William and not Guglielmo, and Henry is Henry and not Enrico... who knows why...
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:46 PM   #260
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Sometimes you latinize. Nicolaus Copernicus - org. Mikołaj Kopernik.
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