daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Closed Thread

 
Thread Tools
Old August 12th, 2010, 11:19 PM   #281
seem
Mornar bez mora
 
seem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Slovakia
Posts: 8,012
Likes (Received): 79

I was listening some of my Croatian music on PC now and ć sounds imo sth like čš.
__________________
Slovakia-One photo a day

Zauvik si tu, u mojim mislima i grudima..
seem no está en línea  

Sponsored Links
Old August 12th, 2010, 11:51 PM   #282
x-type
con los terroristas
 
x-type's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Bjelovar [HR]
Posts: 13,472
Likes (Received): 3448

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad_Hafen View Post
Istria is not good example they say tj instead ć


no.
"ć" is pronounced like in italian ciao.
type in goggle translator word cell in English to translate it in Serbian it is ćelija and you will hear it
than type wait čekati
dude, sorry, but you have no clue about it. Istrian is extreme case of making difference between ć and č. why did i say that you have no clue? because you should study a bit about ć, palatalisation and that stuff, so you would find out that ć is nothing else but palatalized t. ciao? in Italy you will find 100 ways to pronounce it, that example is really funny. not to mention google translator.

if you have something against Istria, then i can change example. in Serbian speech and dialects difference between č and ć is much more perceptible than in Croatian, generally speaking (you will nowhere find such extreme as in Istria where they soft it so much).
__________________
Svaki dan sanjam autobahn...
x-type no está en línea  
Old August 13th, 2010, 01:04 AM   #283
engenx4
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,017
Likes (Received): 12

Portuguese and English










Last edited by engenx4; September 4th, 2010 at 01:35 AM.
engenx4 no está en línea  
Old August 13th, 2010, 03:21 PM   #284
Bad_Hafen
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13,882
Likes (Received): 160

Quote:
Originally Posted by x-type View Post
dude, sorry, but you have no clue about it. Istrian is extreme case of making difference between ć and č. why did i say that you have no clue? because you should study a bit about ć, palatalisation and that stuff, so you would find out that ć is nothing else but palatalized t. ciao? in Italy you will find 100 ways to pronounce it, that example is really funny. not to mention google translator.

if you have something against Istria, then i can change example. in Serbian speech and dialects difference between č and ć is much more perceptible than in Croatian, generally speaking (you will nowhere find such extreme as in Istria where they soft it so much).
Well you didn┤t understand me, the way Istrians say ć it is not regular or typical way how it should sound. They ff course make difference and the difference is very noticeable.
Google translator is one way where he can get a picture how it should sound if you have better way than explain him! Don┤t be a smartass.

And yes i have something against Istria
Bad_Hafen no está en línea  
Old August 15th, 2010, 11:52 PM   #285
Kevlargeist
Registered User
 
Kevlargeist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Helsingfors
Posts: 501
Likes (Received): 879

In Finland the linguistic policy goes like this:

1) A unilingually Finnish municipality: Finnish signage
2) A unilingually Swedish municipality: Swedish signage
3) A bilingual, majority Finnish municipality: Finnish name on top, Swedish name below
4) A bilingual, majority Swedish municipality: Swedish name on top, Finnish below

If the linguistic make-up of the municipality changes, a signage change is on the way. Also, if an unilingual municipality becomes part of a bilingual municipality, also the signs of the previously unilingual area become bilingual.

A municipality is bilingual if the percentage of Swedish/Finnish-speakers in minority is at least 8% or if the speakers amount to at least 3,000 people. There are also Sami-language cases in Northern Finland.

Examples:

First in Finnish


First in Swedish
Kevlargeist no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 12:28 AM   #286
TohrAlkimista
Registered User
 
TohrAlkimista's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Milano
Posts: 13,225
Likes (Received): 920

So, on the ┼land Islands how does it work?
__________________
TohrFlickr
||| ||| |||
36 Hours in Milan
TohrAlkimista no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 12:42 AM   #287
Kevlargeist
Registered User
 
Kevlargeist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Helsingfors
Posts: 501
Likes (Received): 879

^Everything is Swedish and only Swedish.

Like in unilingually Finnish parts of Finland where everything is only Finnish.
Kevlargeist no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 12:57 AM   #288
TohrAlkimista
Registered User
 
TohrAlkimista's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Milano
Posts: 13,225
Likes (Received): 920

No offence, but this sounds pretty discriminatory.
If I'm a Finnish and my mother tongue is Finnish (vast majority of the population), I'm not supposed to know Swedish, so, I could be a little bit confused when it comes to understand the signage.
__________________
TohrFlickr
||| ||| |||
36 Hours in Milan
TohrAlkimista no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 01:23 AM   #289
Kevlargeist
Registered User
 
Kevlargeist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Helsingfors
Posts: 501
Likes (Received): 879

Finland has two official languages, Finnish and Swedish, and jurisdictionally they have exactly the same status in this country. ┼land is a special autonomous, self-governing province and its only official language is Swedish.

There are unilingually Finnish parts and there are unilingually Swedish parts, it's as confusing and "discriminatory" for each group to visit another language area.

And while most Finnish-speakers have only rudimentary Swedish skills, you could say they're "supposed to know Swedish", as Swedish (like Finnish) is a mandatory school subject.

Last edited by Kevlargeist; August 16th, 2010 at 01:29 AM.
Kevlargeist no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 07:43 PM   #290
Ayceman
Registered User
 
Ayceman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bucharest
Posts: 2,690
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by x-type View Post
dude, sorry, but you have no clue about it. Istrian is extreme case of making difference between ć and č. why did i say that you have no clue? because you should study a bit about ć, palatalisation and that stuff, so you would find out that ć is nothing else but palatalized t. ciao? in Italy you will find 100 ways to pronounce it, that example is really funny. not to mention google translator.

if you have something against Istria, then i can change example. in Serbian speech and dialects difference between č and ć is much more perceptible than in Croatian, generally speaking (you will nowhere find such extreme as in Istria where they soft it so much).
Nominally ć is a palatalised č, but pronunciations vary.
Ayceman no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 08:15 PM   #291
Jonesy55
Mooderator
 
Jonesy55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Floreat Salopia
Posts: 14,205
Likes (Received): 20313

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevlargeist View Post
Finland has two official languages, Finnish and Swedish, and jurisdictionally they have exactly the same status in this country. ┼land is a special autonomous, self-governing province and its only official language is Swedish.

There are unilingually Finnish parts and there are unilingually Swedish parts, it's as confusing and "discriminatory" for each group to visit another language area.

And while most Finnish-speakers have only rudimentary Swedish skills, you could say they're "supposed to know Swedish", as Swedish (like Finnish) is a mandatory school subject.
Leaving the aland islands aside, are there many areas in Finland where Swedish is the majority language? Are these whole districts/towns or just neighbourhoods?

I knew that there was a Swedish speaking minority in Finland but I thought that it was only the aland islands that were really Swedish linguistically and that elsewhere there was a thinly spread bilingual minority.
Jonesy55 está en línea ahora  
Old August 16th, 2010, 10:06 PM   #292
x-type
con los terroristas
 
x-type's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Bjelovar [HR]
Posts: 13,472
Likes (Received): 3448

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayceman View Post
Nominally ć is a palatalised č, but pronunciations vary.
no. ć i palatalized t, and č is palatalized k
__________________
Svaki dan sanjam autobahn...
x-type no está en línea  
Old August 16th, 2010, 10:43 PM   #293
Kevlargeist
Registered User
 
Kevlargeist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Helsingfors
Posts: 501
Likes (Received): 879

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55 View Post
Leaving the aland islands aside, are there many areas in Finland where Swedish is the majority language? Are these whole districts/towns or just neighbourhoods?

I knew that there was a Swedish speaking minority in Finland but I thought that it was only the aland islands that were really Swedish linguistically and that elsewhere there was a thinly spread bilingual minority.
There's one mainland province that is majority Swedish, Ostrobothnia (Ísterbotten/Pohjanmaa), located on the western coast with a population of about 180,000 of which ca 55% are Swedish-speakers, and where some municipalities are about 98% Swedish. Then there are some (wholly independent) municipalities in Southwestern and Southern Finland that are majority Swedish-speaking.
Kevlargeist no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 01:28 AM   #294
manuelmonge
Registered User
 
manuelmonge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: living in: Mexico City, from: Mazatlan, second cities: Obregon/Phoenix/Tucson
Posts: 2,935
Likes (Received): 6931

manuelmonge no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 01:29 AM   #295
manuelmonge
Registered User
 
manuelmonge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: living in: Mexico City, from: Mazatlan, second cities: Obregon/Phoenix/Tucson
Posts: 2,935
Likes (Received): 6931


This is a sign in the town of Ixmiquilpan, at the central state of Hidalgo, Mexico, where Otomi language is spoken. Mexico have 62 oficial native languages, but we dont have a lot of bilingual signs because only like 5% don't understand spanish.

Hope one day the goverment start to put bilingual signs in native zones, even if nobody talks that language like Europe .
manuelmonge no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 11:26 AM   #296
g.spinoza
Lord Kelvin
 
g.spinoza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Torino
Posts: 9,507
Likes (Received): 2115

Cannot see the sign
g.spinoza no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #297
CNGL
Leudimin
 
CNGL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Huesca
Posts: 7,462
Likes (Received): 1937

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Beware Pince/Pince.
Once I saw (Asturian/Spanish) San Pelayo/San Pelayo .
__________________
Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum, quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non nunquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem - Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum, from which placeholder text is derived.
CNGL no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 12:20 PM   #298
Angelos
Registered User
 
Angelos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Athens of the north
Posts: 583
Likes (Received): 447

Bilingual examples of Greek sings: On top is Greek and below is latin characters











Angelos no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 12:58 PM   #299
Danielk2
DanielKK
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dronninglund
Posts: 670
Likes (Received): 2

How come greek road signs are a total copy of german ones?
__________________
thinkmetric
Danielk2 no está en línea  
Old August 28th, 2010, 01:00 PM   #300
Angelos
Registered User
 
Angelos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Athens of the north
Posts: 583
Likes (Received): 447

no idea
Angelos no está en línea  


Closed Thread

Tags
autobahn, motorways, signage

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium