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Old September 5th, 2012, 03:29 PM   #781
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Centre is British English for center, which is American English.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 03:32 PM   #782
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Germanic languages also have a tendency to form very long combined words, making them hard to understand for foreigners like Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänsmütze or rörelseuppskattningssökintervallsinställningar
For me it was pretty easy to learn German and English,but Russian was hard.I had 7 years Russian in school,never had English in school most of my English comes from Beavis & Butt-head but my English is probably better then my Russian and i am Slavic.I dont wanna know how hard is for somebody who speaks English,French,Arabian,Spanish and so on to learn Russian
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Old September 5th, 2012, 03:42 PM   #783
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Originally Posted by Road_UK View Post
Centre is British English for center, which is American English.
What I meant to say is, to keep to one standard all road sign, doesn't matter to me if is British,American or any other English.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 03:46 PM   #784
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Let's have some Jamaican English in Bulgaria then. A little bit of Carribean culture in a Slavic country...
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Old September 5th, 2012, 03:48 PM   #785
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Check this out:
The sing says: "Str. 20th of April"
[IMG]
http://www.google.com/imgres?start=130&um=1&hl=en&sa=X&tbm=isch&tbnid=OwCFy3eWIv3qoM:&imgrefurl=http://www.offroad-bulgaria.com/showthread.php%3Ft%3D86867&imgurl=http://marinchev.com/img/20april.jpg&w=450&h=313&ei=NElHUO_4D8fZ0QW13YHoAw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=181&vpy=157&dur=1251&hovh=187&hovw=269&tx=66&ty=205&sig=107234406224726159432&page=10&tbnh=149&tbnw=195&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:5,s:130,i:169&biw=1272&bih=523[/IMG]

Last edited by Dolph; September 5th, 2012 at 03:54 PM.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 03:52 PM   #786
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Originally Posted by Road_UK View Post
Let's have some Jamaican English in Bulgaria then. A little bit of Carribean culture in a Slavic country...
I was talking hypothetically
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Old September 5th, 2012, 04:17 PM   #787
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For me it was pretty easy to learn German and English,but Russian was hard.I had 7 years Russian in school,never had English in school most of my English comes from Beavis & Butt-head but my English is probably better then my Russian and i am Slavic.I dont wanna know how hard is for somebody who speaks English,French,Arabian,Spanish and so on to learn Russian
I took Polish my senior year in college (American "in college" = British "at university") because I'm good at languages and that's where all my ancestors are from.

Unfortunately, after about a month all the words started to look alike. Think I'd reached my limit.

I haven't tried to learn Russian but did teach myself (at age 8...) the Cyrillic alphabet. I know if I tried to learn Russian the alphabet would be a barrier: when I read place names in a Latin-alphabet language language I don't know, it's reasonably fast, but with Greek or Cyrillic (where I know the alphabets but not the languages, so I'd only use them to read proper names) it's far slower. I've heard that in your own language you recognize words rather than letters* - your brain takes in the beginning and end and fills in the rest so you don't actually have to look at every letter - and apparently that works for me for other Latin-alphabet languages but not in other alphabets. So I imagine I'd have trouble with road signs in Russia or Greece that don't have a transliteration.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 05:23 PM   #788
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I believe(and many of my friends to) that at least in Bulgaria all road signs should be in Bulgarian and in English only, no Latin, no French or German.
It ridiculous right now, we have sings in Sofia- Center,Centre,Centrum for the city center. It's a lot easy to sign everything in English, like in airport or subway.
Another complication is Latin transliteration of names like Sofiya .In all maps,road atlas,airports etc. is written Sofia. Its so easy to keep everything in English.


Spain can be the country in Europe that receives more people on tourism.

And... depending on areas you will find signs in some languages or other...

If it is a not specially tourist area, only in Spanish (as well as if you go any medium country you will find most of signs in their language).

But in touristic areas it is a really Babel tower.

Usually English is everywhere... but not always. Where I have been on holidays a lot of signs are in Catalan, Spanish, French and German. Why??, English tourism there is not usual. German it is, and France is close there.

Should you go to Canary Islands and you will find almost all in Spanish, English and German. It is curious but... signs on airports are on those three languages and in the same order. At least official signs. Not only Spanish and English but also German. Why?, There are a lot, lot, lot of flights from Germany and Austria.

My city is a big inner city that do not receive as many tourism as other areas but still receive visitors. In main monuments you can find information in several languages but if you go to the tourism office they will give you information in several languages and... specially if you ask in English and... Italian.

Italian people means about 30% of foreing visitors in the city...
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Old September 5th, 2012, 05:45 PM   #789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alserrod

Spain can be the country in Europe that receives more people on tourism.

And... depending on areas you will find signs in some languages or other...

If it is a not specially tourist area, only in Spanish (as well as if you go any medium country you will find most of signs in their language).

But in touristic areas it is a really Babel tower.

Usually English is everywhere... but not always. Where I have been on holidays a lot of signs are in Catalan, Spanish, French and German. Why??, English tourism there is not usual. German it is, and France is close there.

Should you go to Canary Islands and you will find almost all in Spanish, English and German. It is curious but... signs on airports are on those three languages and in the same order. At least official signs. Not only Spanish and English but also German. Why?, There are a lot, lot, lot of flights from Germany and Austria.

My city is a big inner city that do not receive as many tourism as other areas but still receive visitors. In main monuments you can find information in several languages but if you go to the tourism office they will give you information in several languages and... specially if you ask in English and... Italian.

Italian people means about 30% of foreing visitors in the city...
Yes, I went to Barcellona and somethimes it was easier being understood in Italian than in English (I don't speak Spanish). Being both Latin languages many words are quite similar although the grammar is completely different. Trying to read a Spanish paper in the hotel I managed to understand something here and there. That would impossible if it was written in German or Slovenian.
For this reason many Italian students go to cultural exchanges in Spain and vice versa.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 06:04 PM   #790
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alserrod View Post
Latin languages usually have words with a lot of vowels.
Like "cuoiaio", 6 vowels, the word with more consecutive vowels in Italian

It designates a person that works and/or sell leather (cuoio = leather).

As curious as the western European words with few or no vowels I cannot ever imagine how to read.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 06:30 PM   #791
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo

Like "cuoiaio", 6 vowels, the word with more consecutive vowels in Italian

It designates a person that works and/or sell leather (cuoio = leather).

As curious as the western European words with few or no vowels I cannot ever imagine how to read.
I think only Slavic languages have vowel-less words.
Such Krk (HR island) or Trst (SLO-HR) for Trieste.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:20 PM   #792
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Like "cuoiaio", 6 vowels, the word with more consecutive vowels in Italian

It designates a person that works and/or sell leather (cuoio = leather).

As curious as the western European words with few or no vowels I cannot ever imagine how to read.


In Spanish "Ayuntamiento" means town hall. It is one of those words with... the five vowels inside!!!!!. I am looking for any traffic signal with the name but do not get at google. Maybe later looking in google earth and near any town hall of any city.

PS: "murcielago" (bat) is another all-five-vowels words
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:24 PM   #793
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Yes, I went to Barcellona and somethimes it was easier being understood in Italian than in English (I don't speak Spanish). Being both Latin languages many words are quite similar although the grammar is completely different. Trying to read a Spanish paper in the hotel I managed to understand something here and there. That would impossible if it was written in German or Slovenian.
For this reason many Italian students go to cultural exchanges in Spain and vice versa.


About studying... it is strange because in Spain the offer is all wide Europe, including Italy of course but not only that country.
Reading an Italian text, for instance, is easier than a French text for a Spanish speaker (and a Portuguese text is much easier).


Being at Barcelona, for a Latin language speaker there is a hint: as far as they speak two Latin languages (Spanish and Catalan) and a lot of signals and texts will be found bilingual, you can choose which one to read. They are different but close one to other... and maybe they use that word easier to understand.

For non Latin languages speakers there is a problem: should you have a dictionary for any translation you will have to know first of all in which language they are written. You will not find enough differences but impossible to find translation if you use the wrong dictionary.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:34 PM   #794
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I think only Slavic languages have vowel-less words.
Such Krk (HR island) or Trst (SLO-HR) for Trieste.
Try čmrljčki (little bumblebees).
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:38 PM   #795
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Originally Posted by alserrod View Post
In Spanish "Ayuntamiento" means town hall. It is one of those words with... the five vowels inside!!!!!. I am looking for any traffic signal with the name but do not get at google. Maybe later looking in google earth and near any town hall of any city.

PS: "murcielago" (bat) is another all-five-vowels words
There's one word in English that has all five vowels, and in the right order. But I can't remember it....
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:42 PM   #796
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Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Yes, I went to Barcellona and somethimes it was easier being understood in Italian than in English (I don't speak Spanish). Being both Latin languages many words are quite similar although the grammar is completely different. Trying to read a Spanish paper in the hotel I managed to understand something here and there. That would impossible if it was written in German or Slovenian.
For this reason many Italian students go to cultural exchanges in Spain and vice versa.
When I was in Spain hiking in the Sierra Nevada I met a couple of Spaniards and tried to talk to them in English (I know some Spanish but I was too tired to try). The guy asked: "Where are you from?". I answered "Italy". The guy (in Spanish) "so speak Italian and I'll speak Spanish, it's easier for all"


I never took any class of Spanish, but in the rest of Spain I got by speaking Spanish - or at least a good guess. Maybe it's because in my native Italian dialect there are many words and phrases similar to Spanish.

An example:
Eng: "I like very much"
Ita: "Mi piace molto"
Spa: "Me gusta mucho"
Dial: "Me gusta muntovè".

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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:44 PM   #797
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Verso, sounding like "tchmerlitchki"...?
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:46 PM   #798
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There's one word in English that has all five vowels, and in the right order. But I can't remember it....
Abstemious, abstentious, arsenious, caesious, facetious?
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:53 PM   #799
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[blushes]
Okay, I guess I heard somewhere that there was only one such word and I believed it.

I think "facetious" was it.

I'm not sure "abstentious," "arsenious" and "caesious" actually exist outside of unabridged dictionaries. And if "caesious" does, we probably spell it "cesious" over here.

But "abstemious" does exist. So my source (for the only-one-such-word thing) was lying.

EDIT: Merriam-Webster on line (http://www.merriam-webster.com/) only finds "arsenious" of those three.
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Old September 5th, 2012, 08:54 PM   #800
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Verso, sounding like "tchmerlitchki"...?
I would say [chmərlchki] (accent on "ə", and you can omit "j").
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