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Old October 9th, 2012, 08:40 PM   #881
italystf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL
I have to look at a map of Spain again, I think I have found five or six penises on town names...

I once found near Udine a street called Via Oselin, that means "little dick" in Venetian dialect.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old October 9th, 2012, 09:14 PM   #882
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This thread is starting to be 90% in English now... :-*
LOL!
And when's the last time we actually saw a sign?
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Old October 9th, 2012, 09:28 PM   #883
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Villanova in Italy. Newcastle in Britain.

Notice: all British places containing "castle" or "chester" (Newcastle, Manchester,...) have Roman origins. Those names come from the Latin "castrum" that means "army camp".
And all places suffixed with -by originate from the era when Vikings ruled most of Britain. For instance: Corby, Thirlby, Newby, Faceby and many more. You may see some resemblance to these names: Brøndby, Nørresundby and Røneby.
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Old October 9th, 2012, 10:30 PM   #884
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If you hear an Italian town ending in -ate 99% is in Lombardy.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old October 10th, 2012, 06:35 AM   #885
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piotr71 View Post
And all places suffixed with -by originate from the era when Vikings ruled most of Britain. For instance: Corby, Thirlby, Newby, Faceby and many more. You may see some resemblance to these names: Brøndby, Nørresundby and Røneby.
I remember watching a series on the evolution of the English language. The Norse suffix -by denoted an orchard. Hence: Appleby = apple orchard, Willoughby = willow orchard/grove, Grimsby = Grim's orchard, etc.
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Old October 13th, 2012, 11:59 PM   #886
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FYI...the new policy is that all the major trunk roads in Scotland, when the signs are to be replaced, will be dual English and Gaelic.
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Old October 15th, 2012, 12:52 AM   #887
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
If you hear an Italian town ending in -ate 99% is in Lombardy.
-ATE, -ANO and -AGO are celtic suffixes!

My nearest towns ending with those suffixes are: Gallarate, Samarate, Cassano Magnago, Fagnano Olona, Olgiate Olona, Dairago, Legnano etc...

You may find those suffixes also in the UK & Eire: -ATE, -ANE and -AGE.

Examples are: Ramsgate, Margate, Stevenage, Artane (a Dublin's borough)
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Old October 15th, 2012, 01:01 AM   #888
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I would assume the "-gate" in "Ramsgate" and "Margate" has nothing to do with "-ate," but comes from the word "gate," which has cognates in Scandinavian languages and German (gata, Gasse....)
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Old October 15th, 2012, 01:08 AM   #889
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Not gates as in the gateway to England? They're coastal towns, open the gate...
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Old October 15th, 2012, 01:10 AM   #890
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Gap in the cliffs, saith Wiki. (Look at the articles for both towns). But Ramsgate's got nothing to do with male sheep.

EDIT: I wonder what original meaning could have led to "gate," "Gasse" and "gata" (Swedish for "street") - "way through," or something? Probably related to go/gaan/gehen....
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Last edited by Penn's Woods; October 15th, 2012 at 01:17 AM.
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Old October 27th, 2012, 09:48 PM   #891
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The shortest bilingual road sign ever?
Photographed in the canton of Valais (CH)



The lake itself cannot be seen, since it is underground.
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Old October 27th, 2012, 10:23 PM   #892
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There's a Slovenian-Hungarian-speaking village in Slovenia called Kot/Kót.
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Old October 30th, 2012, 05:55 PM   #893
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Codroipo come from "quadrivium" that in Italian is "quadrivio" and means "four roads intersection". (Most people know Codroipo just because is the perfect anagram of a very rude swearing expression very popular in this part of Italy )
After wondering for some weeks, I think I have found the very rude swearing expresion: It is "porco Dio" (pig God)?
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Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum, quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non nunquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem - Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum, from which placeholder text is derived.

Last edited by CNGL; October 30th, 2012 at 08:09 PM. Reason: Corrected :P
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Old October 30th, 2012, 06:32 PM   #894
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL

After wondering for some weeks, I think I have found the very rude swearing expresion: It is "porco Dio" (dirty God)?
Porco = pig
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old October 30th, 2012, 11:58 PM   #895
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Porco means both pig and dirty in Portuguese, it probably does in Spanish too
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Old October 31st, 2012, 12:56 AM   #896
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Correct, but it is spelt "puerco".
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Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum, quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non nunquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem - Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum, from which placeholder text is derived.
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Old October 31st, 2012, 01:13 AM   #897
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Linguistic detail... in Spanish a lot of cases of "**-O-**" have been derived to "**-UE-**" such this case.
But anything related with the pig could be PUERC*** or PORC***. For instance, "related about pigs" would be PORCino. (NOT puercino)


Any Spanish speaker would understand PORCO even if that word doesn't exist in the language
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Old October 31st, 2012, 11:26 AM   #898
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz
Porco means both pig and dirty in Portuguese, it probably does in Spanish too
Porco in Italian means pig but it is also used to refer to someone who is "dirty" inside (i.e. sexually lascive or perverted). It's not used as synonimous of dirty in the meaning of lack of hygiene.
Another common profanity is d** c*** (dog G*d). Cane (dog) may be used as insult to refer to a bad person.
Those expression with God are seen as extremely impolite especially in public. They are off-limit even in the most trashy film or TV show and some people have been fired from TV shows for having used them.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old November 1st, 2012, 12:48 PM   #899
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Porco in Italian means pig but it is also used to refer to someone who is "dirty" inside (i.e. sexually lascive or perverted). It's not used as synonimous of dirty in the meaning of lack of hygiene.
Another common profanity is d** c*** (dog G*d). Cane (dog) may be used as insult to refer to a bad person.
Those expression with God are seen as extremely impolite especially in public. They are off-limit even in the most trashy film or TV show and some people have been fired from TV shows for having used them.
Yeah, porco in Portuguese can be literally dirty, but it's closer to disgusting.
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Old December 3rd, 2012, 12:26 AM   #900
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Posted in a Spanish thread:

N-121 connect Pampelune with Irun (city in the border with France). Some drivers try to take AP-8, A-1 and AP-15 / A-15... but I would recommend to take N-121. It is a quite shorter journey, free and will take less time (at A-1 there are limitations of 80 somewhere...)

And... scenics are really beutiful. I suggest you to click street view in any point of N-121 and have a look about the kind of road in a mountain area.

Belate tunnel is a 2900m tunnel that connects the Atlantic area with Pampelune. It is the longest in all the journey and located in the middle of this link
https://maps.google.es/maps?q=pamplo...e+Navarra&z=11

In july 2011 a truck got fired in the middle of the tunnel. As consequences, 10 weeks tunnel cutting (and alternative is not a good road indeed) and 1,1 millions euro for tunnel refurbishment.

After some analysis the considered the risk of a vehicle to have an accident or to have a mechanical problem after a longer uphill.

The Navarra government prepared three special sites for truck parking if having mechanical problems and several signals advicing it is forbidden to entry with mechanical problems.

Take a look to the signal of "trucks with smoke are forbidden"!!!!!!!


There is a sample about a signal in five languages and a photo of another one in three languages which I think don't need translation





Quote:
Originally Posted by miliar View Post
A continuación muestro el ejemplo de unas señales que se han instalado recientemente en los accesos a los túneles de Belate y Almandotz (N-121-A, Navarra).

Según las estadísticas la mayoría de los incendios en túneles no son debidos a accidentes, sino a fallos técnicos de los vehículos que circulan por los mismos. Las tasas de averías registradas en túneles bidireccionales no urbanos es de 300-500 cada 10E+8 veh x km. Este valor se eleva en el caso de túneles con acceso en rampas de gran pendiente a 900-1900 cada 10E+8 veh x km (AIPCR, 1995). Este caso es muy frecuente en los túneles situados en zonas montañosas, como los que nos ocupan.

En julio de 2011 se produjo el incendio de un camión en el interior del túnel de Belate. No hubo daños personales, pero el incidente obligó a realizar una costosa reparación en el revestimiento y las instalaciones del túnel, con el consiguiente corte de tráfico de diez semanas de duración. El coste total de las obras realizadas fue de 1,1 millones de euros.


Fuente: Gobierno de Navarra


Fuente: Gobierno de Navarra

Al margen de esto, durante los últimos meses se venía detectando un número creciente de incidentes provocados por la entrada de vehículos con problemas mecánicos en el interior de estos túneles. Se observó además, por medio de las camaras instaladas en las bocas, que en muchos casos los problemas comenzaban en las rampas de acceso. Sin embargo, los vehículos no se detenían en el exterior, sino que entraban en el túnel y terminaban parando en el interior, por lo que un simple problema mecánico se convertía en un incidente más serio.

Para controlar esta situación, la consejería de Obras Públicas de Navarra ha habilitado tres zonas de parada en los accesos a los túneles para que los camiones que sufran algún tipo de problema técnico durante la subida puedan detenerse. Se ha diseñado una señalización especial, que informa a los conductores de la necesidad de parar y no entrar en los túneles en caso de avería. El coste de la actuación ha sido de casi 270.000 euros.


Fuente: Gobierno de Navarra


Fuente: Gobierno de Navarra

Saludos.
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