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Old February 9th, 2014, 06:15 PM   #1221
volodaaaa
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Is that codified language or just dialect? I am just curious, because it is quite peculiar to have traffic signs in dialect :-D
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Old February 9th, 2014, 06:39 PM   #1222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hofburg View Post
because apparently they never went further than Bovec
They probably consider it the capital of Slovenia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by volodaaaa View Post
Is that codified language or just dialect? I am just curious, because it is quite peculiar to have traffic signs in dialect :-D
Something inbetween.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resian_dialect
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Old February 17th, 2014, 11:36 PM   #1223
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That old joke with *******, Austria, now on video:

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my clinched highways
My wife has just started a travel blog. Check it out here: makeitcount.blog
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Old February 18th, 2014, 02:52 AM   #1224
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Croatian in Graz (A).


http://www.panoramio.com/photo/44585246

Drive to the stop line to turn on green light!

High-tech stuff.
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Old February 18th, 2014, 07:58 AM   #1225
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why Croatian in Graz?
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Old February 18th, 2014, 01:08 PM   #1226
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Maybe it's an old sign from when Serbo-Croatian was the official language of the whole Yugoslavia. There's a sign in Gonars rest area written in Italian, English, German, French and... Croatian, with the old Yugoslavian flag next to the text in Croatian.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old February 18th, 2014, 02:53 PM   #1227
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It looks like a new sign to me and I doubt they had automatic traffic lights back then. There are many Croats shopping in IKEA in Graz, I suppose (like many Slovenes).
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Old February 18th, 2014, 04:15 PM   #1228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
It looks like a new sign to me and I doubt they had automatic traffic lights back then. There are many Croats shopping in IKEA in Graz, I suppose (like many Slovenes).

We wasted our slovenian sign today for good, with a hockey victory over Österreich
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Old February 18th, 2014, 04:34 PM   #1229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Maybe it's an old sign from when Serbo-Croatian was the official language of the whole Yugoslavia.
It was just administrative (like German, French and Italian in the entire Switzerland). Slovenian was the only official language in Slovenia (like Romansh in parts of Switzerland).
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Old February 18th, 2014, 06:00 PM   #1230
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This is a special linguistic issue. When Tina Maze gets a medal in skiing, her town Črna na Koroškem (literally "Black in Carinthia") changes its name for a few days.

"Black in Carinthia":


"Silver in Carinthia"


"Golden in Carinthia":


She won a second golden medal in the Olympic Games today, so...


And sometimes just:


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Old February 18th, 2014, 06:03 PM   #1231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Maybe it's an old sign from when Serbo-Croatian was the official language of the whole Yugoslavia. There's a sign in Gonars rest area written in Italian, English, German, French and... Croatian, with the old Yugoslavian flag next to the text in Croatian.
this is definitely not serbo-croatian.
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Old February 18th, 2014, 07:08 PM   #1232
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this is definitely not serbo-croatian.
What's the definition of Serbo-Croatian? I though that Serbian and Croatian were basically the same language, apart few different words (like BrE and AmE, for example in UK they say motorway, in the USA freeway, in Croatia autocesta and in Serbia autoput) and, obviously, a different script. Was the old Serbo-Croatian a mixture of the modern Croatian and modern Serbian? Or the two languages started to differentiate some words after the breakup of Yugoslavia?
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old February 18th, 2014, 07:45 PM   #1233
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
What's the definition of Serbo-Croatian? I though that Serbian and Croatian were basically the same language, apart few different words (like BrE and AmE, for example in UK they say motorway, in the USA freeway, in Croatia autocesta and in Serbia autoput) and, obviously, a different script. Was the old Serbo-Croatian a mixture of the modern Croatian and modern Serbian? Or the two languages started to differentiate some words after the breakup of Yugoslavia?
serbo-croatian was official name of that language in SR Serbia and its standard was today's serbian. croato-serbian was name of that language in SR Croatia and its standard was today's croatian. however, that serbocroatian is quite a political issue and i don't like mentioning it too much, that's why i reacted so.
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Old February 19th, 2014, 12:11 AM   #1234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-type View Post
serbo-croatian was official name of that language in SR Serbia and its standard was today's serbian. croato-serbian was name of that language in SR Croatia and its standard was today's croatian. however, that serbocroatian is quite a political issue and i don't like mentioning it too much, that's why i reacted so.
I have "Czechoslovak-Serbocroatian" dictionary at home something for pure federalists
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Old February 21st, 2014, 02:22 AM   #1235
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I've always wondered why we don't sign "Poreč/Parenzo".

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Old February 21st, 2014, 11:44 PM   #1236
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http://goo.gl/maps/kZY37

This is a little confusing since Ogulin also happens to be the nearest Croatian town in direction Split.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 12:46 AM   #1237
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
I've always wondered why we don't sign "Poreč/Parenzo".
It must be a mistake because Porec\Parenzo and Pula\Pola have the same bilingual legal status.
Here (Opicina, Italy) they wrote Capodistria\Koper, Fiume\Rijeka but only Lubiana (without Ljubljana) and Pola (without Pula). Among these, only Capodistria\Koper and Pola\Pula are officially bilingual.
Here, they wrote Sezana only in Slovenian (it's Sesana in Italian). Sezana it's not a bilingual town but I think it's the only sign in Italy written only in a foreign language (if we exclude Villach since its Italian exonim, Villaco, is almost never used).
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 12:52 AM   #1238
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I noticed that Austria never uses German exonims on its signs, just local names (no trace of Prag, Brunn, Pressburg, Marburg, Laibach and Weiden, I wonder if those are still used in everyday speech).

EDIT: among these, only Prag and Brunn are used on de.wikipedia, so other are probably archaic.
Only it.wikipedia keeps using Italian exonims even when they are never used anymore. Yes, we go to holiday to Parenzo, Pola or Fiume where also some Italians live. Or also to Zara or Spalato. But nobody say that he went to Lesina island (Hvar) or Capocesto (Primosten). And Ragusa is in Sicily, not in Dalmatia. And I never heard someone arriving in Greece with the ferry to Gomenizza , only to Igoumenitsa, but still, Italian wikipedia policies requires the use of all exonims even when they're ridiculous.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

Last edited by italystf; February 22nd, 2014 at 01:01 AM.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 01:11 AM   #1239
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
I noticed that Austria never uses German exonims on its signs, just local names (no trace of Prag, Brunn, Pressburg, Marburg, Laibach and Weiden, I wonder if those are still used in everyday speech).

EDIT: among these, only Prag and Brunn are used on de.wikipedia, so other are probably archaic.
On de.wikipedia there are no exonims like Neusatz (Novi Sad), Maria-Theresiopel (Subotica) or Großbetschkerek (Zrenjanin). In case of Subotica there is a remark "Maria-Theresiopel - deutscher Name 1740–1918". However, names of the articles stay official.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 02:38 AM   #1240
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
It must be a mistake because Porec\Parenzo and Pula\Pola have the same bilingual legal status.
No, even this new sign only shows Poreč.

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Here (Opicina, Italy) they wrote Capodistria\Koper, Fiume\Rijeka but only Lubiana (without Ljubljana) and Pola (without Pula). Among these, only Capodistria\Koper and Pola\Pula are officially bilingual.
Probably because of similar names.

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Here, they wrote Sezana only in Slovenian (it's Sesana in Italian). Sezana it's not a bilingual town but I think it's the only sign in Italy written only in a foreign language (if we exclude Villach since its Italian exonim, Villaco, is almost never used).
There's a new sign only with Ljubljana on A4 by Villesse (for A34). Then there is this sign (Liubljana is in no language, of course), this sign shows Bovec (Plezzo) and Kranjska Gora (Monte Cragnisca), Breginj (Bergogna) and Kobarid (Caporetto), Gorjansko (Goriano), Lipica (Lipizza), Osp (Ospo), Socerb (San Servolo), Plavje (Plavia), Škofije (Scoffie), Kolomban (Colombano, which is even bilingual), I think I've also seen Kozina (without Cosina) and in Aosta they sign Bern (without Berna) and Lausanne (without Losanna).

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
I noticed that Austria never uses German exonims on its signs, just local names (no trace of Prag, Brunn, Pressburg, Marburg, Laibach and Weiden, I wonder if those are still used in everyday speech).
Marburg is widely used on signs (along with Maribor), Prag also sometimes (even without Praha) and there is one sign with Laibach/Ljubljana on A10 by Spittal and I think even Aßling/Jesenice on A11.
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Last edited by Verso; February 22nd, 2014 at 03:21 AM.
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