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Old February 22nd, 2014, 03:22 AM   #1241
italystf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post

this sign shows Bovec (Plezzo) and Kranjska Gora (Monte Cragnisca), Gorjansko (Goriano), Lipica (Lipizza), Osp (Ospo), Socerb (San Servolo), Plavje (Plavia), Kolomban (Colombano, which is even bilingual), I think I've also seen Kozina (without Cosina) .
Among these, Lipizza is the only one I usually heard. However, the Slovenian and Italian names have the same pronunciation. There's even the expression "cavalli lipizzani" (Lipica's horses) for the equine race. But also Lipica is found on some Italian texts.
Bovec and Kranjska Gora are quite well-known in Italy as touristic centres, but they are referred with Slovenian names even in Italy. Kranjska Gora was never under Italian rule so the Italian name is just made up (Gora is translated with Monte and Cragnisca it's probably a phonetic calque of Kranjska). Until today, I didn't even know we had an exonym for Kranjska Gora. It's comparable to Villaco (for Villach) or Oristagno (for Arnoldstein).
Other places (Gorjansko, Socerb, Osp, Plavje, Kolomban) are just villages, relevant only because they are border crossings (like Fernetti and Rabuiese, albeit less busy and more local). It's difficult to tell whether the Italian or Slovenian name is more common, since those places aren't mentioned that often.
On the other hand, it's extremely strange to hear an Italian saying or reading in an Italian text Koper, Piran, Izola, Portoroz, Umag, Porec, Rovinj, Opatja, Pula, Rijeka, Zadar, Split. Italian exonyms are always used. Dalmatian islands and small towns on the Dalmatian coast are instead only referred in Croatian, although they all have Italian exonyms.
I find very strange the sign with Kobarid only, since Caporetto is very famous in Italy for the WWI battle and almost nobody know Kobarid.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old February 22nd, 2014, 03:46 AM   #1242
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I find very strange the sign with Kobarid only, since Caporetto is very famous in Italy for the WWI battle and almost nobody know Kobarid.
And even Slovenija. Of those villages, Italians probably say Ospo (because of the river) and Colombano (because it's bilingual). I don't know about others.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 02:11 PM   #1243
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I noticed that Austria never uses German exonims on its signs, just local names (no trace of Prag, Brunn, Pressburg, Marburg, Laibach and Weiden, I wonder if those are still used in everyday speech).

EDIT: among these, only Prag and Brunn are used on de.wikipedia, so other are probably archaic.
Only it.wikipedia keeps using Italian exonims even when they are never used anymore. Yes, we go to holiday to Parenzo, Pola or Fiume where also some Italians live. Or also to Zara or Spalato. But nobody say that he went to Lesina island (Hvar) or Capocesto (Primosten). And Ragusa is in Sicily, not in Dalmatia. And I never heard someone arriving in Greece with the ferry to Gomenizza , only to Igoumenitsa, but still, Italian wikipedia policies requires the use of all exonims even when they're ridiculous.
Exonyms are interesting issue. I still don't know how to take them. Somehow, the original names sounds better to me, but only in some cases.

Speaking of Pressburg, there are lot of streets in world named Pressburg street, but it is after Pressburg peace (signed in Bratislava/Pressburg), no after city itself.

Colloquially, i always use Zagreb, Graz, Györ, Pécs, Linz, Oradea, Thessaloniki, Szeged, Miskolc or Cluj-Napoca in my speech instead of well defined, rather archaic exonyms (Záhreb, Štajerský Hradec, Päťkostolie, Linec, Veľký Varadín, Solún, Segedín, Miškovec, Koložvár).

But I use Slovak exonyms for Paris, London or Belgrade at the same time.

Personally, I don't like using exonyms, because not every city is defined and it indeed sounds ridiculously to me to refer Viedeň, Štajerský Hradec, Hainburg or Wolfsthall at once .
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 05:32 PM   #1244
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No, even this new sign only shows Poreč.
Maybe Slovenian bilinguism law doesn't mandate the bilinguism for Croatian places signposted in Slovenia, so they choosed Porec that is more used internationally than Parenzo. But then, they should have skipped pola too to be consistent.
Is Pula the only city with a different name in Slovenian and Croatian (Pula\Pulj)?
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 05:45 PM   #1245
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Speaking of Pressburg, there are lot of streets in world named Pressburg street, but it is after Pressburg peace (signed in Bratislava/Pressburg), no after city itself.
Obviously old names are still used when commemorating historical events. It would be ridiculous to talk about the siege of Saint Petersburg or the battle of Volgograd during WWII.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old February 22nd, 2014, 06:51 PM   #1246
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Is Pula the only city with a different name in Slovenian and Croatian (Pula\Pulj)?
We don't really use it though, we call it 'Pula'. We call Rijeka 'Reka' (like its inhabitants actually call it) and theoretically Karlovac is 'Karlovec' and Sisak 'Sisek' (and basically all other settlements with such an ending, but we don't really use it). Interestingly, there's a village called Gradac in Slovenia.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 07:13 PM   #1247
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and theoretically Karlovac is 'Karlovec' and Sisak 'Sisek' (and basically all other settlements with such an ending, but we don't really use it).
Sisak and Karlovac were originally called Sisek and Karlovec in their native dialects as well, but the ending changed due to migrations of people (speakers who use the -ak/-ac endings became dominant). -ec is still pretty common in Central and Northern Croatia (Čakovec, Brdovec, Ivanec, etc.).

Quote:
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Interestingly, there's a village called Gradac in Slovenia.
Looking at the map, the village seems to be located in Bela Krajina. The name could have been perhaps given by the Slavs who migrated there from the south-east (during the Ottoman onslaught).
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 07:24 PM   #1248
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We call Rijeka 'Reka' (like its inhabitants actually call it)

where the hack did you hear that?
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 07:45 PM   #1249
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where the hack did you hear that?
That's how the old natives of Rijeka used to call it (but not anymore). Some of them called it Reka, some Rika (the accent was on the last syllable, different than now).
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Old March 6th, 2014, 04:20 PM   #1250
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Some spanish signs in Brazil






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Old March 6th, 2014, 05:13 PM   #1251
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no se adelante ( ????? )
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Old March 6th, 2014, 05:21 PM   #1252
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WTF...

"no se adelante" = "do not overpass yourself"

"no adelante" = "do not overpass"
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Old March 6th, 2014, 06:39 PM   #1253
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me ha hecho gracia la expresion
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Old March 6th, 2014, 07:58 PM   #1254
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Some spanish signs in Brazil
Are there some Spanish-speaking minorities there? Or are them near the border with a Spanish-speaker country?
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 6th, 2014, 08:04 PM   #1255
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to my best knowledge, they aren't.

When they speak in Spanish it is quite easy to guess if it is a Portuguese or Brazilian who speaks, either if his mother language is the same. Portuguese are quite used to hear and use Spanish, Brazilians not so much even if almost all neighbour countries use that language.

I always remember a long time ago a Portuguese footballer who, speaking in Spanish, had an accuracy almost perfect and no accent. Later, any Brazilian one... is often to have a translator for first months either if languages are so close.
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Old March 7th, 2014, 01:54 AM   #1256
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alserrod View Post
Portuguese are quite used to hear and use Spanish.
Not so sure about that.
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Old March 9th, 2014, 01:01 AM   #1257
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WTF...

"no se adelante" = "do not overpass yourself"

"no adelante" = "do not overpass"
Johny, la gente esta mi loca, wtf
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Old June 19th, 2014, 01:37 PM   #1258
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Billingual sign (Serbian and Slovak) in Aradac, Vojvodina, Serbia.

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Old June 28th, 2014, 10:50 PM   #1259
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Bilingual signs spotted in St. Moritz, Graubünden, Switzerland
(Graubünden is the only canton with three official languages: German, Italian and Rumantsch)

1. German first



2. Italian first

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Old July 17th, 2014, 01:21 PM   #1260
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"The town's hall" obviously isn't correct translation...
These tourist signs in Zrenjanin were installed in 2008, but nobody cares for this wrong translation...

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