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Old July 11th, 2015, 04:47 PM   #541
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
It is also possible that some ferry routes that carry E-routes do not exist in reality.
For example there is no ferry connection between Norrköping in Sweden and Ventspils in Latvia, even though the two cities carry the E22 route, best alternative for this is the Nynäshamn-Ventspils ferry.
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Old July 11th, 2015, 07:37 PM   #542
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Quote:
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At least one E-route is designated, but does not exist in reality (unbuilt as opposed to unsigned). That is E404 in Belgium. It is designated to run from Jabbeke to Zeebrugge, but there is no such road connection.
The most appropiate number for an non-existing road. E404: Route not found . I believe there is a E00x somewhere in central Asia which also doesn't exist.

Anyway, some time ago I decided to experiment with E-routes over national ones, but I have since reverted.
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Old July 11th, 2015, 08:20 PM   #543
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I believe there is a E00x somewhere in central Asia which also doesn't exist.
At least some routes are not (entirely) paved. It's questionable to which extent E004 is drivable between Uchkuduk (UZ) and Kyzylorda (KZ).
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Old July 11th, 2015, 08:32 PM   #544
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
What do you mean by standalone? An e-road that does not connect to other e-roads or a road that only runs through one country.

The E251 (B96)Sassnitz-Berlin only goes through Germany. E 251 is a European B class road in Germany, connecting the cities Sassnitz – Stralsund – Neubrandenburg – Berlin
I could have clarified. I mean roads that only carry an E-number. It looks like all E-roads are multiplexed with some other road number.
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Old July 11th, 2015, 08:49 PM   #545
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Some countries (particularly in Scandinavia) have only E-numbers assigned for their European Roads. In some cases there is an administrative route number though, for example in Denmark. Belgium is also a special case, many maps indicate A-numbers, while signage only indicates the E-number. A-numbers are only posted on the kilometer markers. In everyday speech, Belgians use E-numbers, not A-numbers.
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Old July 11th, 2015, 08:57 PM   #546
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I could have clarified. I mean roads that only carry an E-number. It looks like all E-roads are multiplexed with some other road number.
E-roads only carry the E-road number in Norway, Sweden and Denmark at least. Don't know about Sweden and Denmark. But in Norway, national numbers don't include the same numbers as the E-roads. Hence there is no Route 6, 10, 14, 16, 18, 39, 69, 75, 105, 134 or 136 in the national routes. Only exception is Route 12 that starts where E12 ends and continue west where it meets Route 17.
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Old July 11th, 2015, 11:20 PM   #547
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Same in Sweden. There is no riksväg 4, 6, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 45 or 65 since they're all E-roads instead.
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Old July 12th, 2015, 05:14 AM   #548
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Originally Posted by Kjello0 View Post
E-roads only carry the E-road number in Norway, Sweden and Denmark at least. Don't know about Sweden and Denmark. But in Norway, national numbers don't include the same numbers as the E-roads. Hence there is no Route 6, 10, 14, 16, 18, 39, 69, 75, 105, 134 or 136 in the national routes. Only exception is Route 12 that starts where E12 ends and continue west where it meets Route 17.

Special for Norway is they have road number signs that look like E-road signs but without any E. Look here: 651 is not an E-road, but its signed with the same sort of sign like an E-road

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Old July 13th, 2015, 03:41 AM   #549
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There's quite a few city routes that fit the bill, especially port cities. Finland certainly has quite a few.
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Old July 13th, 2015, 11:13 AM   #550
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
At least some routes are not (entirely) paved. It's questionable to which extent E004 is drivable between Uchkuduk (UZ) and Kyzylorda (KZ).
I was thinking about that one. About E404, it can be deleted, it doesn't take that much to go to E403 instead.

I like how E07 runs through my hometown while E007 (technically the same number) is far our in Kyrgyzstan .
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Old July 19th, 2015, 03:23 PM   #551
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In Ukraine the situation with the E-numbers is quite complex. For example E50 is approx. 160 km divided between Stryy and Uzhhorod, but no E signage on M06. Plus there is some paradox about E40, which was once on M11 but now on M10, and the signage is not changed. People in Ukraine never use E-numbers, plus there are roads that have no E-signage but should have. And remember that a road with an E-signage hasn't usually to deal with good roads. See this(E95)
mignews.com.ua/modules/news/images/articles/changing/5747863-dorogu-odessareni-otremontiruet-tolko-p
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Old July 19th, 2015, 05:56 PM   #552
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correct link presumably http://mignews.com.ua/regiony/odessa/5747852.html

(although that's E87).
Quote:
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I like how E07 runs through my hometown while E007 (technically the same number) is far our in Kyrgyzstan .
1)It's not technically the same number - the place holder zeros (despite only Ireland and France, of the countries that have them, using them IIRC) for E01-E09 are to make them 2-digit routes, and for E001-E019 to make them three digits.
2) E007 gets nice and 'close' to Spain in Tashkent - not quite as remote as Kyrgzstan at least

On that matter, when the CIS states joined the UNECE and the system was expanded, Moscow moved to be west of the centre point of the network. However, given the different numbering (E1xx major routes, E0xx three digit ones), E-numbering reaching China doesn't make a jot of difference, unless there is demand for E1xx routes in northern (lower case deliberate) Ireland and Britain that even numbers and use of E20x/E21x couldn't satisfy: so never.
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Old July 19th, 2015, 06:40 PM   #553
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thx. Unfortunately I'm not yet allowed to put some site links to the replies. I'd like to do that, but dunno how
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Old July 19th, 2015, 10:40 PM   #554
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riiga View Post
Same in Sweden. There is no riksväg 4, 6, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 45 or 65 since they're all E-roads instead.
That policy lead to major numbering reform both in Sweden and Norway in the early 1990's when the old system was replaced by the current one.
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Old July 19th, 2015, 11:08 PM   #555
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uppsala View Post
Special for Norway is they have road number signs that look like E-road signs but without any E. Look here: 651 is not an E-road, but its signed with the same sort of sign like an E-road

Norway has messed up their numbering system. In 1980's they invented a system where some roads were more important (stamveg) than the others. The white-on-green signage dates back to this era. A single road might consist of important and less important sections. For example, the middle section on the road 13 was important, and the other part were less important.

That was replaced in 2000's by moving most of the state roads to the ownership of provinces. In that system, the white-on-green means a state-owned road. Most of these are 1- or 2-digit trunk roads, but there are some connecting roads, too, like 651. This system left most on the numbering and signage untouched: The numbers may overlap across provinces, and only those ones which were state-owned earlier are signed by numbers.
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