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Old October 9th, 2009, 04:27 AM   #81
greg_christine
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http://www.dallasobserver.com/2009-1...ntown-gridlock

Counting DART's Light Rail in Heavy Traffic Leads to One Inescapable Conclusion: Downtown Gridlock

By Jim Schutze
Published on October 07, 2009 at 10:37am

What am I doing here with a notebook, waiting for DART trains and being abused by people? I've been out here trainspotting for the last few days, and it's not much fun.

They made a movie about trainspotting, I know, but I think all the people in that movie were heroin addicts. Maybe that's the secret.

For my part, I am lurking around DART stations, systematically writing down the times when DART light rail trains come in. Or not.

A couple of times guys in suits coming off the trains see me standing here, and they start shaking their heads no as they pass. They think I'm some kind of panhandler or phone-card salesman or something!

Look, the timing of the DART trains through downtown is where suburban push comes to urban shove in this city. Dallas has always been dominated by its 'burbs. In the late 1970s, Dallas was still electing major suburban real estate developers as its mayors.

Mayor Robert Folsom ('77-'81) and Mayor Starke Taylor ('83-'87), in fact, were the two biggest independent suburban tract-home developers in the entire region. They devoted their tenures, not surprisingly, to ramming thoroughfares through inner-city neighborhoods in order to get more people out to the boonies faster, the best examples being the cross-town expressway and an infamous failed plot to double-deck Central Expressway.

For decades even when Dallas invested in downtown, the developments it favored tended to be monolithic, fascist-scale shopping mall projects like "Victory" at the American Airlines Center arena, instead of small-scale, diverse urban shop fronts, of which we still have precious few downtown.

But that's changing. Look around the borders of downtown—from Uptown to Henderson Avenue, the Design District to The Cedars—and you'll see dense thickets of development crowding in from the periphery, thriving on a lifestyle that is decidedly urban. It's so un-suburban, it's actually anti-suburban.

So, the trainspotting. On September 14, when DART opened service on a segment of its new Green Line from Carrollton to Pleasant Grove, all the trains in the entire region slowed to a near standstill, choked by a rail traffic jam in downtown. DART said it was just first-day jitters. Now, they say, everything is back to normal.

I say we won't see normal again for about seven years.

I wrote about this last July 23 ("Tracks of My Tears"), and also in April 2008, both times citing DART's own studies predicting havoc if all its new suburban rail lines wind up going through downtown before DART builds a second downtown rail alignment.

In fact, people knew about this when DART first began laying out its rail lines. It was pretty simple. If all of the regional rail lines have to connect through downtown Dallas by passing east and west on the one existing rail corridor on Pacific Avenue, then at some point there will be too many trains trying to get through the bottleneck.

DART promised to take care of the problem by signing a pact with the city almost 20 years ago agreeing to get a second reliever route built through downtown before hooking up its two new train routes—the Green Line and the Orange Line (from DFW Airport to downtown).

But that promise has continued to slip as the more aggressive (and smarter) suburban members of the DART board have pushed for money for line extensions into their own backyards.

Uh...the trainspotting. Getting to it.

I am out here two days before the lightbulb comes on. At first I think DART is doing the impossible—shoehorning all its regular traffic on the existing Red and Blue Lines through downtown, sticking fairly close to schedules, also managing to get the new Green Line trains up and down Pacific without too much disruption.

But I have been timing the wrong thing. I am looking at how often each train shows up—the gaps between trains. Does a train show up every five minutes if a train is scheduled to show up every five minutes?

Kinda sorta. But that's the wrong thing to look at. I should have been looking at when they show up precisely. How close to their schedules are they?

Not at all. They're all over the map. A train that's supposed to be here at 7:26 shows up at 7:30. Train scheduled for 7:34 shows up at 7:32.

So what possible difference does that make? You can wait an extra minute or two.

But the difference is downtown. What I am really looking at is one giant traffic implosion getting ready to happen downtown in December 2011. That's when the final branch of the system, the Orange Line from DFW, comes on line. Here's the deal.

The trains go up and down Pacific Avenue. Cars go back and forth across Pacific Avenue. If cars can't cross Pacific, vehicular traffic can't cross downtown, especially since our city council in its stupefying un-wisdom has agreed to a pernicious scheme called "signal prioritization."

DART trains drive on the streets downtown. They have to stop for red lights just like cars. Or they did. Now with signal prioritization the driver of a DART train can push a button and turn the light ahead of him green.

How'd you like to have that in your car? Well, DART does have it, as of this year.

DART's deal with the city calls for trains to come by on Pacific every two and a half minutes and take maybe 30 seconds to unload and load passengers.

Not bad, eh? That leaves two minutes for car traffic to sort itself out, some of it passing north and south across Pacific, some it passing east and west on Main and Commerce and Elm.

DART says it will be able to stick to those "two-and-a-half-minute headways" when the Orange Line brings the train traffic on Pacific up to 48 trains an hour.

But wait. Forty-eight trains an hour would be a train every one and a quarter minutes, wouldn't it? Check me on that, because I am admittedly a history and political science major. But I think if you divide 60 minutes by 48 trains you get one train per minute and a quarter.

Ah, wait! Wait! I'm down here in the DART station beneath Cityplace saying, "Wait! Wait!" loudly to myself, and people walking by me are shaking their heads no, but I do think I get it.

DART intends for the trains to be sync'd so that two trains—one running east and another running west through downtown—will pass each other at precisely timed moments causing fewer traffic interruptions.

Morgan Lyons, the spokesperson for DART, explains that to me: "While the traffic signals cycle every 75 seconds (or 1.25 minutes)," he says, "it's often the case that trains in each direction will move through the intersection so you wouldn't always have that many interruptions."

If everything runs like a Swiss watch.

But what I've been finding out here the last couple days is that everything is running like musical chairs. In fact, back at the office when I put all of my times in an Excel spreadsheet, this is what I find:

Trains that are supposed to be running at 10-minute intervals are running at five minutes, seven minutes, nine minutes apart. Trains that are supposed to be running at five minute intervals are running at six, four and three minutes. And almost none of them is hitting the precisely scheduled moment when it is supposed to arrive at a given station.

If I place myself right by the point where the trains come out of the Central Expressway tunnel and rise to ground level at the east end of downtown, I can see why the timing is so jagged: two-thirds of the trains I am watching slow down and even halt for a few minutes before entering downtown.

Swiss watch, hell. They're winging it!

DART trains are entirely driver-operated. The drivers are stopping, starting and speeding up to accommodate each other through the bottleneck, but that means they're out of sync when they pass through downtown. And remember each one of them is jamming on that little button to get nothing but green lights through downtown. That means nothing but red lights for the cars.

In fact, when I go downtown and watch, that's what I see at rush hour. Already, even without the added pressure of the Orange Line, the car traffic must wait and then leap through momentary gaps in a staggered wall of trains.

Think what it will be when the Orange Line comes on line and the number of trains reaches its max.

That's another whole kettle of fish, by the way. DART claims it is running only 42 trains per hour through downtown at rush hour now. When I count using DART's own timetables, I get more like 46 to 47 trains even now, without the additional six per hour that the Orange Line will add.

It's not supposed to be this way. According to the original agreement with DART, that second alignment through downtown should already have been in place before the Green Line ever opened, definitely before the Orange Line opens.

The timing now on completing the second alignment is somewhere in the range of six to seven years and DART has only half the money in hand for it.

If Dallas were sticking up for itself, it would hire an independent agency to audit the trains running on Pacific Avenue and to audit the traffic interruptions, then demand that DART take trains out of operation until the agreements can be met on downtown traffic interruptions.

That's not going to happen now, given the current climate. Half the elected officials at City Hall are still more sympathetic with the 'burbs—only they call it "regionalism" now—than with their own city. The other half are asleep at the wheel.

The city will only be moved to defend itself when the Orange Line opens and downtown traffic goes to hell in a handbasket in December 2011. It takes a disaster to make anything happen in this town.

But we'll get there.
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Old October 9th, 2009, 05:49 PM   #82
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That is exactly why DART has project D2, a downtown subway serving the southern end of downtown (see http://www.dart.org/about/expansion/downtowndallas.asp). Unfortunately, the project won't be launched until way after the orange line is complete. Another thing not mentioned is that the green line is only partially open. I'm sure once the whole line is open, many more trains will be passing through downtown.
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Old October 9th, 2009, 06:09 PM   #83
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Thanks for the link. It seems they have not yet finalized the route.

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Old October 10th, 2009, 04:26 AM   #84
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They are leaning toward option B3b, which is the most expensive. That's because it is part of the City of Dallas's pet project involving a hotel and convention center.
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Old October 12th, 2009, 05:22 PM   #85
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Here's the Dallas streetcar proposal that is in the works. They are hoping to purchase modern streetcars next year.

http://dallascityhall.com/committee_...Dev_101209.pdf

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Old October 14th, 2009, 05:40 PM   #86
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Dallas may have downtown streetcar line within 5 years
09:44 PM CDT on Tuesday, October 13, 2009
By RUDOLPH BUSH / The Dallas Morning News
[email protected]
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...omments_anchor

Dallas could have a downtown streetcar system up and running within five years if an ambitious plan being hashed out at City Hall becomes reality.

City Hall still hopes to build the line with the help of federal and state funds. But many City Council members appear ready to have Dallas go it alone, likely by issuing tens of millions of dollars in bonds backed by anticipated growth in downtown property tax revenues.

"That's exactly what we're investigating now. We have to figure out the route, the cost and the physical challenges. Then we have to figure out what level of development each [proposed] route will support so we understand the possible bond funding," said council member Angela Hunt, whose downtown district would include the streetcar line.

Under the plan, the bonds could fund construction of the line even as taxes from rising property values helped fund its operation.

It is unclear at this point, however, whether the city can raise enough bond money for the cost of building the line or whether it will have to seek outside funding to fill in the gap that city money can't cover.

Linda Koop, chairman of the council's transportation committee, appeared confident the funding question will be answered in a matter of months and the council can begin the process of ordering Dallas' streetcars.

"We're hoping to have it up and running in 4 ½ years," Koop said.

Koop estimated the cost of building a downtown streetcar line at around $80 million, a preliminary figure that surely will change as details of the project are set.

...

Hunt said Dallas is in discussions with Fort Worth, where a streetcar system is also in the works, to purchase cars with similar designs in an effort to minimize costs.

At a meeting of the transportation committee Monday, council members hashed out how financing might work for the proposed line.

It appears it would rely heavily on two funding sources: tax increment financing and public improvement district dollars.

Council members expect a streetcar line would significantly improve property values around its stops.

Additional tax revenue from growing values could be devoted to paying off bonds sold to fund the line.

Though the city would own the line, it is expected that DART will oversee its construction and operation and have a say in its governance through seats on a board of directors established specifically for the line.

While focus at City Hall is now on the downtown streetcar line, there is also movement to create a master plan to expand lines through downtown's adjoining neighborhoods.

Koop is working to form committees for five districts around downtown to study possible routes and financing for an expanded streetcar system.

The committees will include a council member and representatives from businesses and neighborhoods in the corridors.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 10:51 PM   #87
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Great plans...

When is the building starting? Or has it already?
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Old October 30th, 2009, 11:52 PM   #88
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Some new drawings of DCTA's A-Train:

Before:


After:








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Old October 30th, 2009, 11:53 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poshbakerloo View Post
Great plans...

When is the building starting? Or has it already?
Nothing has started yet until the streetcar routes are finalized. They hope to order streetcars and start construction in the next year or so. The MATA Streetcar, the heritage line, will extend their tracks closer into downtown Spring 2010.
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Old November 2nd, 2009, 06:51 AM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayayess1190 View Post
Dallas is my favorite city in Texas. I visited with my father a few years ago, and we also went to Fort Worth and Houston. We rode the lightrail and the TRE from Dallas to Ft.Worth and back. Great to see such improvements to the area transit while here in Philly Septa struggles to find funding.
You clearly haven't been to Austin or you might like it even more than Dallas.

Although it's a shame Austin does not yet have anything like DART and although Austin's first commuter rail line will barely begin to run sometime by next year, Austin has the only downtown in Texas where people actually live and play (in significant numbers) and not only work and where many others live immediately around downtown, just walking distance...where downtown does not shut down at 5pm and where you see people driving Smart cars and Vespas and biking around the central neighborhoods. Almost all downtown Austin surface parking lots (so symbolic of cities of the southern US) have been developed with condos with ground floor retail.
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Old January 26th, 2010, 07:10 PM   #91
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DART Green Line construction photos from November. These are new images from DART's site (there are many more there not pictured below): http://www.dart.org/newsroom/imagelibrary.asp

Buckner



Lake June



Lawnview



Hatcher



Market Center



Southwestern Medical Center/Parkland



Inwood



Love Field



Bachman



Walnut Hill/Denton



Farmers Branch



Downtown Carrollton



Trinity Mills



North Carrollton/Frankford

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Old January 26th, 2010, 07:33 PM   #92
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Bachman and Farmers Branch are interesting. So they used the island platform style awnings on side platforms, installing 2 of them? Those would be the first in the system like that, right?
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Old January 26th, 2010, 07:43 PM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zaphod View Post
Bachman and Farmers Branch are interesting. So they used the island platform style awnings on side platforms, installing 2 of them? Those would be the first in the system like that, right?
Bachman has 3 tracks/4 platforms, since it's a major interchange between the Green Line and Orange Line (similar to Victory).

The canopy design at Farmers Branch isn't common, but it's not the first time. Similar stations exist at Baylor University Medical Center, Bush Turnpike, Downtown Plano, Akard, St Paul and West End.

The more unusual of the bunch is Trinity Mills, which has the trademark arched roof of a typical station but also has a 3rd track and shared platform for DCTA's A-Train :

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Old February 17th, 2010, 06:23 PM   #94
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Dallas gets $23 million for street cars from federal stimulus
9:50 AM Wed, Feb 17, 2010
Rudolph Bush/Reporte
http://cityhallblog.dallasnews.com/a...n-for-str.html

Word comes now that the city of Dallas was a big winner of a federal transportation grant for a new streetcar system.

The city was selected to receive $23 million for a core streetcar system.

Developing with details to come.

http://www.dot.gov/documents/finaltigergrantinfo.pdf


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Good news! Although, Fort Worth didn't get the money they were hoping for...

Dallas scores big in TIGER grants; Feds will fund street cars
9:51 AM Wed, Feb 17, 2010
Michael Lindenberger/Reporter
http://transportationblog.dallasnews...tiger-gra.html

Dallas scored big this morning as Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced the city will received $43 million in grants that will build a starter downtown streetcar loop that will cross into Oak Cliff, and will greatly reduce NTTA's cost to build the State Highway 161 toll road.

Its two projects were among 51 -- and the only ones in Texas -- to win out in the competition TIGER grant competition announced this morning. The federal government had reserved some $1.5 billion in stimulus funds for a grant competition aimed at providing funds for creative projects, especially those that achieve the Administration's sustainability goals.

Dallas' application for the street car funds was part of a joint application with Fort Worth, and it always was seen as a long-shot, even though that outlook brightened somewhat last month when the Obama Administration announced that it would reverse a Bush Administration policy of requiring all transit applications to be judged first on cost-effectiveness.

That departure made projects like trolley lines that remove relatively few cars from the highways more likely to pass review. (Fort Worth's portion of the application was not successful.)

The U.S. Department of Transportation described the $23 million street car grant like this:

Quote:
The proposed streetcar line originates in Downtown Dallas at Harwood and Main Street, continuing down Main Street to Houston Street through the largest job center in the North Texas area. The line has a stop at Union Station in Downtown Dallas, which provides access to the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Authority's Red/Blue Light rail lines and to Fort Worth via the Trinity Railway Express. It also includes stops at the Dallas Convention Center and Hotel, Trinity River Park (which will be among the largest urban parks in the United States), Methodist Medical Center, the Oak Cliff Gateway area and multiple residential areas.
The announcement was made by Lahood in Washington, but also to some Dallas officials by U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Dallas.

...
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Old February 17th, 2010, 06:53 PM   #95
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Good news! Although, Fort Worth didn't get the money they were hoping for...

...[/QUOTE]

Does this mean the Fort Worth streetcar project is gone?
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Old February 17th, 2010, 07:17 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwdwone View Post
_________________


Good news! Although, Fort Worth didn't get the money they were hoping for...

...
Does this mean the Fort Worth streetcar project is gone?[/QUOTE]

According to a post here, the funds may be split among the cities since the money is officially going to NCTCOG... but Fort Worth is still going after funds from other sources. It depends on the exact grant language and it's unclear who will get the funds.

http://fortworthology.com/2010/02/17...n-tiger-funds/

BUT, because the grant was jointly applied for by OCTA (Oak Cliff Transit Authority) and the city of Dallas, any money that goes to Dallas will probably require a streetcar connection from the Dallas CBD to Oak Cliff.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...127f32376.html

Last edited by dfwcre8tive; February 17th, 2010 at 08:33 PM.
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Old April 9th, 2010, 06:11 PM   #97
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Private money may be used to build Cotton Belt corridor rail line
07:42 AM CDT on Friday, April 9, 2010
By MICHAEL A. LINDENBERGER / The Dallas Morning News
[email protected]
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...c.3f70d2e.html

With transportation funds running short at every level, regional planners for the North Central Texas Council of Governments are seeking permission to lead an unusual partnership with private investors so they can fast-track a 62-mile rail line known as the Cotton Belt corridor.

The plan, already supported by the two lead transit agencies in Dallas and Fort Worth, would use private money to build the rail line. And for the first time, the Regional Transportation Council would be put in charge of negotiating a contract outlining service levels, fares and other aspects of the new rail line.

DART and The T in Fort Worth would retain a veto over any final deal, and their staff members would sit in on the negotiations, explained Michael Morris, transportation director for the council of governments.

"From our point of view, we have an obligation to look out for all modes of transportation," Morris told the 43-member Regional Transportation Council on Thursday. "We've seen how innovative financing has helped us on the highway side, so our thought is, why not try to bring some of that same innovation to other modes and help our transit agencies develop rail lines as well."

The deal would be different than any of the private toll deals that have dominated discussions of highway financing for years.

Instead of an advisory role, the RTC would be in charge of selecting the firms to partner with and would negotiate the financing details for the plan, which could involve about $1 billion.

Morris said that if his approach is approved, the RTC could have a final deal to vote on, and to forward to the transit agencies, by the end of this year.

The council was poised to vote Thursday, but Dallas County Commissioner Maurine Dickey and Collin County Commissioner Joe Jaynes asked for more time, and the 43-member RTC tabled the item for a month.

...

DART knows of no other transit agency in the country that has opened a passenger rail line paid for by private investors, DART spokesman Morgan Lyons said. A public-private partnership in Denver is under way, but the transit agency has made big contributions of tax dollars to keep that project, already delayed and scaled back, moving forward.

The Cotton Belt plan, by contrast, would seek private investors to build the system without a penny from DART or The T.

The plan would most likely include much steeper fares for the Cotton Belt, paid parking, and the creation of special tax districts that would capture property tax increases associated with private development along the rail line.

...

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Old April 11th, 2010, 08:02 AM   #98
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Considering the size of Dallas, I suggest they build at least one subway line.
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Old April 12th, 2010, 07:20 AM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKorean View Post
Considering the size of Dallas, I suggest they build at least one subway line.
They're huge, yes. But the Dallas-Ft. Worth Area lacks density, so what it has now is fine. (Though what they're planning now (Which includes an underground segment.) will make it even better.)
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Old April 12th, 2010, 07:07 PM   #100
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Station Designs for the Orange Line: http://www.dart.org/newsroom/imagelibrary.asp#orange



University of Dallas











Las Colinas Urban Center











Irving Convention Center











Las Colinas Carpenter Ranch











North Lake College











Belt Line Station









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