daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 18th, 2010, 07:34 PM   #2281
Vrooms
threeyearson.
 
Vrooms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Singapore
Posts: 9,676
Likes (Received): 1641

Source:http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20101118/...antas_airbus_5

Quote:
Debris from Qantas A380 engine severed cables: memo

LONDON (Reuters) – Pilots struggled to shut down an engine on the Qantas A380 that made an emergency landing this month, because debris from the Rolls-Royce engine that broke up mid-flight severed cables.

Airbus told airlines in its latest technical bulletin on the incident that three "high-energy" turbine fragments flew out of the engine when it exploded, and two of these severed cables in the wing. The report, seen by Reuters on Thursday, said this explained why pilots could not immediately shut down a different engine after the plane landed in Singapore.

Airbus did not blame Qantas pilots or pinpoint a further cause for the accident beyond what Rolls-Royce has identified as a problem with a component in the engine's turbine.

Earlier Sky News reported a memo sent to operators of A380 aircraft had revealed a "cascade of failures" aboard the Qantas plane. The bulletin seen by Reuters did not mention a cascade of failures although it did say the "crew had to manage a dynamic situation" as a result of damage from the explosion.

"The reason engine one could not be shut down has been determined: two segregated wiring routes were cut by two out of the three individual disk debris," the bulletin said, before listing all systems that continued to operate in support of the crew.

It was not immediately clear if the report seen by Sky was the same as that handed to Reuters, although details quoted by the broadcaster were the same.

Shares in EADS and Rolls-Royce, which had been little changed ahead of the Sky report, initially dipped before quickly erasing their losses to trade broadly flat.

Qantas said earlier on Thursday that about 40 Rolls-Royce engines used in the world's fleet of Airbus A380 aircraft may need to be replaced.

(Reporting by Paul Hoskins and Tim Hepher; editing by Sarah Young and David Hulmes)
__________________
🔥🚀
Vrooms no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 18th, 2010, 07:41 PM   #2282
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Quote:
Originally Posted by simcard View Post
you know what, given no one died in this incident, it is a good thing this explosion happened and the problems faced in real life. Lessons learned will only make planes better in the future. I would not say this if any passenger on board that plane lost
life (s)
It's not surprising a new aircraft experiences teething problems with its designs. Luckily, this one survived and returned to tell the tale.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 08:17 AM   #2283
Vrooms
threeyearson.
 
Vrooms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Singapore
Posts: 9,676
Likes (Received): 1641

Source:http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20101119/..._a380_qantas_1

Quote:
Qantas faces several weeks before A380s fly: source

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Qantas Airways (QAN.AX) likely faces several more weeks before its fleet of six Airbus A380s can return to service, a source with direct knowledge said on Friday, threatening to squeeze its capacity as it heads into the busy Christmas and summer holiday season.

The delay also indicates Rolls-Royce (RR.L) will need more time than Qantas expected to resolve the engine issue, which led to a November 4 oil fire and explosion on a Qantas jet with 466 people on board shortly after it departed Singapore for Sydney.

Qantas immediately grounded its fleet of Airbus (EAD.AX) A380s -- the world's largest passenger plane with a list price of around $350 million each -- pending an investigation, but has no deadline on the process after several initial indicative deadlines by the airline passed.

"It's a very complex process and it's still in the early stages," said the source.

"I expect Rolls-Royce and Qantas are still several weeks away from putting together an action plan and its documentation," said the source, who asked not to be named because they were not authorized to discuss the issue.

Rolls-Royce, which has said little publicly about the investigation, last week announced that the failure was confined to a specific component in the turbine area and it would replace the relevant module according to an agreed program.

A Qantas spokeswoman said the airline had no time schedule to put the A380 back in service and it remained engaged with Rolls-Royce to resolve the issue.

Australia's aviation safety authority ATSB also declined to discuss the investigation.

"The ATSB welcomes pro-active safety initiatives in response to the occurrence, but any decision on engine replacement is one for respective airline operators, manufacturers and airworthiness authorities," it said in a statement.

Australia's Civil Aviation Safety Authority will have to make a final approval before Qantas is able to resume flying the A380.

On Thursday, Qantas Chief Executive Alan Joyce said the world's fleet of Airbus A380 aircraft may need to replace around 40 Rolls-Royce engines or about half of the total in service, to ensure safety.
__________________
🔥🚀
Vrooms no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 08:26 AM   #2284
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Qantas A380 Suffered Multiple Problems, Could Have Exploded -Reports
19 November 2010

CANBERRA (Dow Jones)--A Qantas Airways Ltd. (QAN.AU) A380 superjumbo that experienced a fiery engine blowout earlier this month suffered a "cascade of system failures" according to Australian media reports Friday.

The system failures are detailed in a memo sent by airline maker Airbus to all operators of the A380 superjumbo airliners. The memo, seen by Sky News, gives a detailed breakdown of what happened to the plane following an explosion believed to have been caused by leaking oil from the Rolls-Royce engine.

Images contained in the leaked report show a large hole in the wing support of the A380, with metal ripped open, revealing the broken mechanism underneath.

Separately, the Sydney Morning Herald cites an unnamed "official preliminary" report saying that shrapnel from the engine explosion severed a fuel pipe and narrowly missed the wing's fuel tank.

Qantas was "very, very lucky" that thousands of liters of highly flammable jet fuel in the wings did not ignite from the ruptured fuel pipe or a spark from severed wiring, Adrian Mouritz, head of aerospace and aviation engineering at RMIT University in Melbourne, told the newspaper.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau is due to release its preliminary findings into the incident by Dec. 3.

Qantas declined to comment and Airbus didn't return a call for comment.

Television website: http://www.skynews.com.au

Newspaper website: http://www.smh.com.au
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 10:42 AM   #2285
icracked
Kulia I Ka Nu'u
 
icracked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Beijing (for school)
Posts: 954
Likes (Received): 42

Quote:
Originally Posted by GEwinnen View Post
Lufthansa is a loyal Boeing customer for a long time, though the 747-8I will be in a few years the only aircraft made by Boeing in Lufthansa's fleet!
(current fleet: Airbus: 184 Boeing: 93 - the 737 planes will be replaced by Airbus A319/320/321)

Please tell me, why are there such a small number of orders for the 747-8I?
Just Lufthansa and Korean Air are interested in 33 747-8I. Nothing compared to the 234 orders for the Airbus380!

I personally like the B747-8I, it is and will be the (rare) queen of the skies, but the A380 is the King!
I don't think the A380 is the "king" of the skies, its the new queen while the Boeing 747 got dethrone. Why you ask? The A380 isn't much bigger than the 747-8i and not to mention the A380 is much shorter in length

__________________
H o n o l u l u*
Hawaii

Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by icracked; November 20th, 2010 at 02:49 AM.
icracked no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 12:21 PM   #2286
babribeiro
Registered User
 
babribeiro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 36
Likes (Received): 0

Please, people don't make the a Boeing and Airbus fight.
I think there is a topic already for this fights, so maybe you go fight there?!?! or maybe creat one topic for it??

Thanks
__________________
---------------------------------
---- What is Signature ?????? ----
---------------------------------
babribeiro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 02:14 PM   #2287
simcard
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: London
Posts: 458
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Airbus may seek A380 cost compensation from Rolls

SHANGHAI, China, Nov 18 (Reuters) - Airbus will seek compensation from Rolls-Royce for any disruption caused by plans to re-assign engines in the wake of this month's Qantas A380 emergency, an Airbus spokesman said. He declined to say how many of the manufacturer's engines could have to be changed as a result of the engine blowout which forced a Qantas A380 to return to Singapore on Nov. 4.

"We can't comment on customers but we can say that any cost Airbus incurs, we will seek full financial compensation from Rolls-Royce," the spokesman said by telephone from Toulouse.

About 40 Rolls-Royce engines used in the world's fleet of Airbus A380 aircraft may need to be replaced to ensure safety after one such engine partly disintegrated mid-flight this month, Australia's Qantas said earlier.

Airbus has said disruption caused by the incident could delay A380 deliveries in 2011.
is Qantas eligible to sue Rolls Royce for revenue losses?
simcard no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 05:16 PM   #2288
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Quote:
Originally Posted by simcard View Post
is Qantas eligible to sue Rolls Royce for revenue losses?
If it is indeed a design flaw, then yes, Qantas should be able to sue Rolls Royce.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2010, 03:46 AM   #2289
Vrooms
threeyearson.
 
Vrooms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Singapore
Posts: 9,676
Likes (Received): 1641

Source:http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101119/...uperjumbo_woes

Quote:
Human ingenuity saved the day for plane in crisis
By JOAN LOWY, Associated Press Joan Lowy, Associated Press – Fri Nov 19, 3:43 am ET

WASHINGTON – One moment, the super-sized airliner was climbing thousands of feet over Indonesia. The next, the engine exploded, shooting flames and shrapnel through one wing. Computer warnings of impending systems failures throughout the aircraft started flashing on cockpit screens.

That was the position five pilots found themselves in two weeks ago when their Qantas jetliner suffered an extraordinary engine break down that set off a cascade of events. Each one would have represented a serious safety problem on an ordinary day.

The Airbus A380, which was carrying more than 450 passengers and crew, is on the leading edge of a new generation of smarter, more highly automated airliners — planes so sophisticated that they can sometimes even override a pilot to prevent a critical error. But in this crisis, the pilots' quick and creative thinking, not computer programming, landed the plane safely.

"These conditions were a step beyond what the airplane was designed for, and it was the pilots who sorted it out so that it resulted in a safe landing," aviation safety consultant John Cox of St. Petersburg, Fla., said in an interview Thursday.

Richard Woodward, vice president of the Australian and International Pilots Association and a fellow Qantas A380 pilot who has spoken to the pilots, told The Associated Press that the amount of failures faced by the pilots was "unprecedented."

"There is probably a 1 in 100 million chance to have all that go wrong," Woodward said in an interview.

But it did.

Engine pieces sliced electric cables and hydraulic lines in the wing. One of the beams that attaches the wing to the plane was damaged as well. And the wing's two fuel tanks were punctured. The leaking fuel created an imbalance between the left and right sides of the plane, Woodward said.

The electrical problems prevented the pilots from pumping fuel forward from tanks in the tail. The plane became tail heavy, a condition that could have caused the Singapore-to-Sydney jetliner to lose lift, stall and crash.

And then there was that torrent of computer messages, 54 in all, alerting the pilots to system failures or warning of impending failures.

Luckily, two extra pilots, both captains, were aboard the flight on Nov. 4, two of them undergoing evaluation. In all, the crew had more than 100 years of flying experience.

"The computer can only do what it knows how to do," Cox said. "These extreme catastrophic conditions, very rare as they may be, point to the need for very high-quality training and high-caliber individuals flying the plane."

The pilot, Capt. Richard de Crespigny, concentrated on handling the controls, while the others dealt with the computer alarms and made announcements to the passengers, some of whom said they were frantically pointing to flames streaming from the engine. Working flat out, it took 50 minutes for the pilots to address all the messages.

When pilots receive safety warnings, they are supposed to check the airline's operating manual and implement specific procedures. But with so many warnings, the Qantas pilots had to sort through and prioritize the most serious problems first.

It's likely that for some of the problems there were no procedures because no airline anticipates so many things going wrong at once, said John Goglia, a former National Transportation Safety Board member.

Attention since the Nov. 4 incident has focused on the Airbus 380's damaged Rolls Royce engine. As many as half of the 80 engines that power A380s, the world's largest jetliners, may need to be replaced, Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce said Thursday. That raises the possibility of shortages that could delay future deliveries of the superjumbo.

Qantas has grounded its fleet of six A380s.

Woodward nonetheless praised the plane, saying it was a testament to its strength that it was able to continue to fly relatively well despite all the problems. But he also said it's likely reconsideration will be given to the design and location of electrical wiring in the wings.

[Related: Passengers protest in diverted plane]

Airplanes are supposed to be designed with redundancy so that if one part or system fails, another can perform the same function. That didn't always happen in this case, safety experts say.

"The circumstances around this accident will certainly cause the regulatory authorities to take a long and hard look at a number of certification issues," said Goglia, the former NTSB member and an expert on aircraft maintenance.

"What we have got to ensure is that systems are separated so that no single point of failure can damage a system completely," Woodward said. "In this situation, the wiring in the leading edge of the wing was cut. That lost multiple systems."

However, Michael Barr, who teaches aviation safety at the University of Southern California, said a commercial plane can't be designed with certainty to withstand a spray of shrapnel, which can inflict damage anywhere. The proper focus, he said, should be on determining what caused the engine to fail and fixing that problem.

All the experts were agreed on one point.

"It must have been an exciting time on that flight deck," Barr said drily. "It's not something you'd ever want to try again."
__________________
🔥🚀
Vrooms no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2010, 04:51 PM   #2290
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Damage Worse Than Thought in Qantas Blowout
20 November 2010
The New York Times

WASHINGTON -- The A380 superjumbo aircraft whose engine blew apart on departure from Singapore on Nov. 4 was far more seriously damaged than initial reports indicated, with hydraulic and electric failures and serious damage to the plane's skeleton, according to independent experts who examined newly available photographs of the jet and leaked accounts of the investigation.

Investigators have been reconstructing the episode from pilot interviews, the flight data recorder and the jet's damaged parts, but their first major report is not due for at least two weeks. So the new information that has become public offers the clearest picture yet of the cascading problems aboard the Qantas flight.

It also reveals the remarkable performance of the captain, Richard de Crespigny, and the crew. They not only successfully prioritized dozens of emergency signals but also made repeated calm announcements about engine problems that kept the initial alarm from deepening among the more than 430 passengers during the tense 90 minutes between the blowout and the landing.

''It's getting worse and worse, the further it goes,'' said William Waldock, a professor of aviation safety at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, who has been studying photographs and other information in wide circulation on the Internet.

An Airbus slide show on the damage was published on Wednesday by an Australian journalist and blogger, Ben Sandilands. An official of the Australian pilots union, Richard Woodward, has described the cockpit scene to reporters. Some information has been posted by the Australian Transportation Safety Bureau.

Looking at the pictures of the damaged left wing, Mr. Waldock said, ''To see all the places those blades and structures went, it's disheartening.''

What was known immediately after the blowout was that the left inner engine suffered an ''uncontained'' failure, meaning it flung shrapnel through its casing. Photographs showed a hole in the left wing, but there were no official reports of further damage.

But the new information makes it clear that the shrapnel cut hydraulic lines and electric cables in the left wing, disabling equipment throughout the aircraft. It also punctured two of the 11 fuel tanks -- meaning highly flammable fuel was streaming from the left wing -- and damaged the wing's spar, or backbone.

With the power lines severed, the crew could not move fuel from the rear tanks to the forward ones as they emptied, creating the potential that the plane would become so tail-heavy it would stall and crash. The crew also could not reposition the left wing's slats, which are small panels that normally help maintain lift at the low speeds of takeoff and landing. The damage to the spar could have been catastrophic if the plane had hit turbulence.

The crew's first challenge was simply to identify the cause of the alarms that suddenly flooded the cockpit's computer screens.

The number and variety of them put the situation beyond the realm of anything the pilots, who are trained to follow a logical sequence for a single system failure, would have drilled for.

''When you have multiple, unrelated failures, you lose the logic,'' said one veteran American investigator, Gregory Feith. ''Which checklist do you run? Hydraulic? Electrical? The fuel checklist?''

Mr. Woodward, vice president of the Australian and International Pilots Association, said: ''Any of those problems would be an emergency in its own right. To have them all together -- there's no doubt there could have been a different outcome in different circumstances.''

Safety aboard the huge craft -- the largest airliner to date -- has been an overriding concern since its inception. The very idea of a plane that can carry more than 500 people raised unique issues. How fast could such a plane be evacuated in an emergency? If one were to crash and cause numerous injuries, how could so many people be cared for?

The pilots' specialized training included handling simple engine shutdowns and other known possibilities. Uncontained engine failures, however, are ''outside the certification basis,'' said Mr. Feith, a consultant who was formerly a crash investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board. The Qantas event turned the crew into ''test pilots,'' he said.

Several experts said that among the pieces of good luck for the flight was that the captain was undergoing a ''check ride'' -- meaning a more senior captain was aboard to evaluate his performance -- and that the checker was being observed by yet another senior captain. So two extra seasoned pilots were on hand to grapple with the crisis.

Among the complications of the A380's multiple failures, the plane had to land at a higher than normal speed, according to investigators, because without the hydraulics, the crew could not move the slats.

The landing gear had to be lowered by using emergency bottles of pressurized nitrogen. The plane could not use its thrust reversers to slow down, since only the inner two engines had them. With the left engine destroyed, the right one would only have spun the plane out of control.

Even the cockpit voice recorder did not work right, according to a report by Australian investigators. It failed to halt when the plane landed, and because it operated in a two-hour loop, the critical periods were recorded over.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2010, 04:52 PM   #2291
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Airbus A380 mobbed by Chinese aircraft workers

TIANJIN, China, Nov 19 (Reuters) - Chinese Airbus workers mobbed the A380 superjumbo at the planemaker's north China factory on Friday, ignoring the visiting aircraft's recent publicity woes to revel in China's growth in aviation.

Over 300 staff in "Airbus Tianjin" overalls thronged round the world's largest airliner, parked close to where they have learned to assemble smaller Airbus jets for the Chinese market.

"It is big and powerful," said maintenance worker Ma Yan Ming as he gazed up at the double-decker aircraft.

China is yearning for both those attributes as it spreads its wings in global aviation, challenging Europe's Airbus and U.S. planemaker Boeing for a slice of the plane market worth $1.7 trillion over 20 years.

China secured 100 inaugural orders this week for a future 150-seat passenger plane, the Comac 919, intended as its first viable project to build large commercial passenger jets.

The 500-seat A380 landed in Tianjin to pump up A320 assembly workers after appearing at the Zhuhai Airshow.

By assembling some 10 percent of its A320 planes outside Europe for the first time, Airbus aims to boost sales in China which is expected to double its airline fleet in five years.

The first locally assembled A320 rolled out of the Tianjin hangars in mid-2009.

The China visit was not affected by the grounding of some Rolls-Royce powered A380s following this month's Qantas emergency because the demonstration plane has different engines.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2010, 05:40 PM   #2292
archnyer
Architecture Afficionado
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NEW YAWK
Posts: 116
Likes (Received): 3

Wow thats Scairy. Scairbus Scairy.

I'm glad no one was hurt, but who was responsible for choosing the engines? Airbus and the companies that buy them cannot say "we didnt know!", because they chose the plane and that plane had the engines on them. In other words, yes they can claim against airbus or rolls royce but in the end they are responsible to the public. And this is Scairy. Even Lufthansa has grounded its Airbuses now.

What I don't understand is how a company can spend 30 years of designing a plane and building up the technology and then do this to their workers and engineers - how can you compete with that? That's very short sighted thinking and another reason I won't be supporting Scairbus when there are plenty of good souls in Europe who could be building the plane.

The Boeing 747 is bigger (longer) and more beautiful. I don't want to be crowded in with more pax thank you. I'll fly a plane that has been tested for 40 years before I get in another Scairbus, what with the AF447 incident and everything (will they ever find it?)

The real story about this incident is the failure of the hydraulic control.
__________________
aRcHnYeR from SleepNY!
archnyer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 12:04 AM   #2293
future.architect
Far East London
 
future.architect's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,800
Likes (Received): 2031

Quote:
Originally Posted by archnyer View Post

I'm glad no one was hurt, but who was responsible for choosing the engines? Airbus and the companies that buy them cannot say "we didnt know!", because they chose the plane and that plane had the engines on them. In other words, yes they can claim against airbus or rolls royce but in the end they are responsible to the public. And this is Scairy. Even Lufthansa has grounded its Airbuses now.
What drugs are you taking???

An uncontained engine failure could happen on any plane built buy any manufacturer and since it is clearly caused by a design fault with an engine designed and built by rolls royce i can't see how airbus is anthing but the victim in the case. Rolls Royce also had a 787 engine blow up during testing, under your logic this is Boeings fault is it? A 777 crashed at heathrow a few years ago due to ice forming in the engines, was that Boeings fault as well?

At the end of the day, this incident shows how good the a380 is. If the same thing had happend on any other plane, I feel the outcome would not be as good.

Lufthansa havent grounded any planes so stop making things up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by archnyer View Post
What I don't understand is how a company can spend 30 years of designing a plane and building up the technology and then do this to their workers and engineers - how can you compete with that? That's very short sighted thinking and another reason I won't be supporting Scairbus when there are plenty of good souls in Europe who could be building the plane.
Again, whats the issue? Airbus decided to make some (not all) of its a320's in China for political reasons in order to sell more planes. How is that different to what Boeing is doing with the wings (and various other parts) of the 787 which are made in Japan, Italy and other contries. I also detect a hint of racism, are you suggesting the Chinese workers are not as capable as the european workers?
And why are you pretending you give a **** about Airbus's workers, you repetedly descibe the products they put so much effort and skill into makeing as scary and you have vowed to never fly on an a320 and you spend you time on websites like these spreading lies about how 'unsafe' they are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by archnyer View Post

The Boeing 747 is bigger (longer) and more beautiful. I don't want to be crowded in with more pax thank you. I'll fly a plane that has been tested for 40 years before I get in another Scairbus, what with the AF447 incident and everything (will they ever find it?)

The real story about this incident is the failure of the hydraulic control.
More beatiful is subjective and not relevant. Crowded in with more pax is laughable since most a380's dont have that many more seats in than a high density 777 or 747, in other words there are more pax but it is less crowded because there is more space.

Tested for 40 years is laughable as well. A 747 built today has not got much in common with a 747 built 40 years ago. I suppose you will pass at flying the 787 as well when it finaly carries passengers? Or are you saying that you only want to fly in 40 year old planes, may a remind you of twa 800, a 747 that blew up due to old wiring short circuiting in the fuel tank.

I think I will stick to new planes thanks.

What loss of hydraulics? The a380 has the safest hydraulic system ever built. It is the only plane that can fly safely with a total loss of hydraulics. In the qantas incident there was no total loss of hydraulics anyway so i dont know why you are mentioning it.

And why bring up AF447 again? Every type of boeing plane has crashed, some for quite controversial reasons including design flaws. Such as thurst reverser came on for no reason on a 767, uncommanded rudder movement on a 737 the 737 rudder problem caused at least 3 crashes. That is scary.

The a380 is the most technicaly advanced and carefully designed plane flying today (the 787 does not count as flying) and I can't wait to fly on one and plenty of other people are queing up.

I would just like to point out that I have no problem with Boeing, I am just trying to counteract the bullshit this guy keeps on spewing. If Airbus was an American company I dount he would be so hostile.

Last edited by future.architect; November 22nd, 2010 at 12:50 AM.
future.architect no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 03:46 AM   #2294
Suissetralia
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 389
Likes (Received): 67

don't waste time answering him, judging by his interventions I do not think he's reading any comment at all
Suissetralia no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 07:15 AM   #2295
Oasis-Bangkok
From Zero to Hero !!
 
Oasis-Bangkok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bangkok
Posts: 15,947
Likes (Received): 51985

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
Oasis-Bangkok no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 10:55 AM   #2296
Vrooms
threeyearson.
 
Vrooms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Singapore
Posts: 9,676
Likes (Received): 1641

An A380 with Cathay Pacific's standard livery:

http://www.aeronautic.dk/Net_A380-80..._Pacific-2.jpg

It would be nice to see it become a reality someday..........................
__________________
🔥🚀
Vrooms no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 11:27 AM   #2297
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Skymark to Deploy A380s in Tokyo-London Business-Fare Price War
By Chris Cooper and Kiyotaka Matsuda - Nov 22, 2010
Bloomberg

Skymark Airlines Inc., the Japanese carrier planning to buy Airbus SAS A380s, said it expects to make money flying business travelers between Tokyo and London on the superjumbos for less than half the price rivals charge.

“There’s no competition in the business-class segment,” President Shinichi Nishikubo, who owns 49 percent of the low- fare carrier, said in a Nov. 19 interview in Tokyo. “Business- class seats just take the space of two economy seats. There’s no reason to charge as much as airlines do.”

Tokyo-based Skymark will compete with British Airways Plc, All Nippon Airways Co., Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd. and Japan Airlines Corp. on the London service. Nishikubo said he expects to make a profit on the route in the first 12 months after starting the A380 London flights in November 2014.

The carrier’s focus on business passengers flying overseas will help generate operating income of about 2.2 billion yen ($26 million) on sales of 15 billion yen a year on the London- Tokyo route alone, Nishikubo said. That’s almost as much as the company’s total operating profit last year as a budget carrier offering scheduled flights between Japanese cities.

“It appears a big gamble by Skymark,” Paul Dewberry, an analyst at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, said last week. “It’s one that we’ll probably look back on and say is pivotal. It potentially gives Skymark a cost advantage.”

Shares Gain

Skymark, which is listed on the start-up Mothers section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange, rose 4.7 percent to 888 yen at the 3 p.m. close of trading in Tokyo. The shares have fallen 5.8 percent since the Nov. 8 end of trading, when the company announced plans to buy A380s and start international scheduled service.

The planes will be fitted with 114 business-class seats on the upper deck and 280 premium economy seats below, and the first will be delivered in September 2014, Nishikubo said. Singapore Airlines Ltd., the largest operator of A380s, has 60 business-class, 399 economy-class and 12 first-class seats on its superjumbos.

Nishikubo’s plan to rewrite his airline’s low-cost, domestic economy carrier model risks losing the advantages of focusing on regional services with smaller aircraft, said Makoto Murayama, an analyst at Nomura Securities Co.

‘Surprise’

“It comes as a surprise to us that they would launch international services with A380s, the largest planes available,” Murayama wrote in a note to clients after Skymark’s Nov. 8 announcement it planned to buy the aircraft. “Low-cost carriers serving international routes in Asia and Europe mostly use mid-size planes that fly relatively short routes within their regions.”

Nishikubo intends to offer roundtrip business-class tickets on the London-Tokyo route for about 300,000 yen, compared with about 700,000 yen currently offered by Japanese airlines, he said. Frankfurt and New York routes will be added by fiscal 2017.

Skymark signed a memorandum of understanding with Airbus earlier this month covering the purchase of four A380s, with options for two more. The order for the first four planes is worth 1.39 billion euros ($1.9 billion), according to Airbus’s list prices.

The carrier intends to buy two of the aircraft with cash, Nishikubo said. The carrier will arrange leases for the other two with European Aeronautic, Defence & Space Co., the parent of Airbus, he said.

Profit Outlook

Skymark is predicting net income of 5.5 billion yen for the year ending March 31, compared with a profit of 2.6 billion yen a year earlier. The carrier, which flies a fleet of 15 Boeing Co. 737 planes, forecasts sales of 56.5 billion yen for the period.

All Nippon, which has daily flights to London, forecasts net income of 6 billion yen on sales of 1.38 trillion yen for the year ending March 31.

Qantas Airways Ltd., which also flies A380s, grounded its fleet of six of the planes after a blowout in one of the engines on a flight earlier this month from Singapore to Sydney. The carrier said Rolls-Royce Group Plc may have to replace as many as 40 turbines. Skymark hasn’t decided what engines to buy, Nishikubo said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 12:17 PM   #2298
deasine
=)
 
deasine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 2,452
Likes (Received): 57

I'd also like this conversation of "scairbus" to end right now. If I see any more posts on this, it will earn you a ticket to the penalty bench. Ignorance is not an excuse.
deasine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 07:03 PM   #2299
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18158

Don't understand why people would do a rendering of a Cathay A380 when they didn't order any.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2010, 10:31 PM   #2300
icracked
Kulia I Ka Nu'u
 
icracked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Beijing (for school)
Posts: 954
Likes (Received): 42

Quote:
Originally Posted by deasine View Post
I'd also like this conversation of "scairbus" to end right now. If I see any more posts on this, it will earn you a ticket to the penalty bench. Ignorance is not an excuse.
If a person has a reason to use Scairbus as term used for the French aerospace company, it should be allow if he gives legitimate reasons why he uses it Same goes with a person calling Boeing, Scairboeing.
__________________
H o n o l u l u*
Hawaii
icracked no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
air france, airbus, airplane, changi airport, emirates, lufthansa, singapore airlines, suvarnabhumi airport, thai airways

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium