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Old September 22nd, 2005, 09:33 PM   #721
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but, when did the A380 come to EHAM Schiphol intl, Amsterdam, The Netherlands?

Who knows the exact date?
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Old September 22nd, 2005, 09:39 PM   #722
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drunkill
I'm Surprised Sydney will get it first, Melbourne Airport has been ready ofr them since April, first airport in Australia that is ready to recive the planes. Well i think one bit of a terminal upgrade is still going, but the main runway can handle them now.

EDIT: Nvm i should of read a bit further up the page :p
'The Polderbaan' a new runway of Schiphol Airport, which is build between 2000-2003 can handle it already. they have think about the a380 by the design proces.

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Old September 23rd, 2005, 07:22 PM   #723
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Airbus A380 Back On Track After Delays
September 23, 2005

European plane maker Airbus said it has resolved the snags that forced it to delay deliveries of its 555-seat A380 superjumbo by up to six months.

It has been forced to hire more engineers after finding that the amount of work needed to adapt to demand for customized cabins had been underestimated. It also had to redesign part of the wiring that girdles the plane in order to ensure all the modifications required by airlines would work.

"There is no technical showstopper, just bottlenecks in engineering and electrical harnesses" said Charles Champion, who heads the A380 program.

While engineers came up with a solution, Airbus disclosed that deliveries of plane parts from across Europe to the final assembly plant in Toulouse were frozen for three months up to mid-August.

But it said the changes to Europe's most ambitious industrial project had been completed without adding to the EUR1.45 billion (USD$1.77 billion) of cost overruns that had already been budgeted when the plane was considered overweight at the end of last year.

Those overruns do not include penalties owed to airlines for the late deliveries, however.

Airbus new Chief Executive Gustav Humbert told French reporters last week the cost of these would be less than EUR100 million but rowed back on Thursday, saying the final figure needed to be negotiated.

Since starting test flights earlier this year, the A380 has flown over 300 hours, occasionally touching speeds close to the sound barrier, or Mach 0.95, when thrown into a test dive, Champion said. The maximum operating speed will be 0.89 Mach.

"We have really tortured the plane," Champion told journalists.

The first plane due to be delivered commercially is one of five A380s taking shape under an undercoat of green paint in the assembly plant, with only the livery on the tail giving away its future owner -- Singapore Airlines, which will receive the plane in November or December 2006.

So far one plane a month is coming through the assembly chain but this is scheduled to increase to just over four a month and Champion said Airbus was looking at whether to increase this even further to catch up with lost output. No decision had been taken.
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Old September 23rd, 2005, 09:25 PM   #724
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WHERE THE KEY PARTS ARE BUILT


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Old September 23rd, 2005, 09:29 PM   #725
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1st class luxuries on board.









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Old September 28th, 2005, 11:32 PM   #726
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Anyone else hear about this? Even if this guy's concerns are unfounded, it's awful how AI went after this guy and ruined his life.
******************
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...?track=tottext

A Skeptic Under Pressure
A U.S. engineer faces bankruptcy and arrest in Austria as he questions the safety of a component in the huge Airbus A380 jetliner.


By Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer


VIENNA — Ever since the Mangans gave up their comfortable house in Kansas City, Kan., and moved here a year ago, the family has been living in a kind of suspended animation.

It almost looks as if they just moved into their two-bedroom apartment near Austria's old Imperial Palace: Some boxes shipped from the U.S. have never been opened and the bedroom windows are still covered with sheets because the family ran short of money before they could buy curtains.

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The three young Mangan children have stopped asking about their plight, although 9-year-old Timothy gets angry every once in a while. "I wish I can yell at them," he blurted out recently about his father's former employer.

Joseph Mangan, 41, is a whistle-blower. As a result he and his family find themselves in a foreign country with unfamiliar laws, fighting a legal battle that has left them almost penniless.



A year ago, Mangan told European aviation authorities that he believed there were problems with a computer chip on the Airbus A380, the biggest and costliest commercial airliner ever built. The A380 is a double-decked engineering marvel that will carry as many as 800 passengers — double the capacity of Boeing Co.'s 747. It is expected to enter airline service next year.

Mangan alleges that flaws in a microprocessor could cause the valves that maintain cabin pressure on the A380 to accidentally open during flight, allowing air to leak out so rapidly that everyone aboard could lose consciousness within seconds.

It's a lethal scenario similar to the 1999 crash that killed professional golfer Payne Stewart and five others when their Learjet lost cabin pressure and they blacked out. The plane flew on autopilot for hours before crashing in South Dakota.

Mangan was chief engineer for TTTech Computertechnik, a Viennese company that supplies the computer chips and software to control the cabin-pressurization system for the A380, which is being assembled at the Airbus plant in France.

In October, TTTech fired Mangan and filed civil and criminal charges against him for revealing company documents. The company said the information was proprietary and he had no right to disclose it to anyone.

Mangan countersued, saying he had been wrongly terminated for raising legitimate safety concerns.

Unlike U.S. laws that shield whistle-blowers from corporate retaliation, Austrian laws offer no such protection. Last year an Austrian judge imposed an unusual gag order on Mangan, seeking to stop him from talking about the case.

Mangan posted details about the case anyway in his own Internet blog. The Austrian court fined him $185,000 for violating the injunction.

And the Vienna police, who are conducting a criminal investigation into the matter, searched the family's apartment for four hours, downloading files from Mangan's computer as his children watched.

Boxes of documents detailing his allegations clutter the living room, but Mangan can't show the material or talk about the case — at least in Austria.

To discuss his case with The Times, Mangan took a five-hour train ride to Munich, Germany, where the gag order doesn't apply. "I don't want to destroy TTTech," he said. "But I still get nightmares of people dying. I just can't let that happen."

To help pay living expenses and legal fees, Mangan sold his house in Kansas. With only about $300 left in his bank account, Mangan missed a Sept. 8 deadline to pay his $185,000 fine and faces up to a year in jail. Next month he's likely to be called before a judge on his criminal case.

The family expected to be evicted this month from their apartment, but their church in Vienna took up a collection to pay their rent.

At the moment, Mangan is hiding out at a church member's home because he fears he could be arrested at any time.

Mangan's wife, Diana, has been reading a book, "Lord, Where Are You When Bad Things Happen?" to make sense of the family's ordeal. "He's trying to do the right thing. Why are we suffering for it?" she said.

On both sides of the Atlantic, Mangan's case has raised eyebrows in the close-knit aerospace community, which is fascinated by his allegations but unclear about how serious they are.

Hans Weber, a veteran aviation consultant in San Diego, can't say whether Mangan has a legitimate claim because he hasn't seen the evidence. But he is baffled by the extent to which Airbus and TTTech have "gone after" Mangan.

"There is something really unusual about this case in the sense that there is this hard standoff between Airbus and the individual," Weber said. "It doesn't make any sense to me."

One of Mangan's key allegations is that because of the A380's unusual design, any loss of cabin pressure would be extremely dangerous.

Most passenger jets have two cabin-pressure valves, with separate motors operating each. Because aircraft makers want redundancy on safety systems, the planes have three motors for each valve, with different chips controlling each motor. The Boeing 777, for example, has cabin-pressure chips made by Motorola Inc., Intel Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. Most jetliners also have a manual override so that the pilot can take control in an emergency.

Airbus has acknowledged that its designers faced challenges as they attempted to reduce the A380's weight. Early on, the company elected to go with four outflow valves on the A380, with only one motor on each valve, which is slightly larger than a cabin window. Each motor uses a TTTech controller chip, and there is no manual override system.

"Just there, I would not be happy," said Chris Lomax, a retired engineer who helped design the cabin-pressurization systems for Boeing's 737 and 747. "If all four valves [on the A380] were driven wide open, it would be nip and tuck for the crew to get their [oxygen] mask on and begin a descent."

Airbus says that the A380 has achieved redundancy by installing the extra cabin-pressure valves, which provide a safety cushion in case a valve fails. As for Mangan's allegations, they are "an unsubstantiated crusade," Airbus spokesman Clay McConnell said.

"Don't you think we would look into it, and if we found it was true we would do something about it?" McConnell asked.

The A380, which is undergoing flight testing, is a year behind schedule because of unspecified problems. But Airbus has told aviation authorities that there is ample time to fix any problems that are discovered during the certification process.

TTTech executives insist that their product is safe. They portray Mangan as a disgruntled ex-employee seeking retribution and eager to blackmail them. "He's trying to destroy the company," Chief Executive Stefan Poledna said.

TTTech supplies parts to Hamilton Sundstrand, a United Technologies Corp. unit that is building the A380's cabin-pressurization system. "The matters raised by Mr. Mangan have been thoroughly reviewed," a Hamilton Sundstrand spokeswoman said, "and safety of flight will be assured."

The European Aviation Safety Agency, which is handling the A380's flight worthiness certification, has reviewed Mangan's allegations. "We have done the research and acted accordingly," spokesman Daniel Holtgen said. "We can't comment on it because it is a matter for Airbus."

Mangan believes that the European aerospace establishment is whitewashing his claims because of enormous cost savings that will be realized if TTTech's chips are approved for the A380.

TTTech's chip originally was designed for use in autos, and the company is trying to get it certified as an existing, "commercial off-the-shelf" product that is acceptable for the A380, according to court records.

Mangan, however, alleges that the chip is being customized for aviation purposes, and thus must undergo stringent testing before being approved by regulators.

If regulators decide that TTTech's chip is a simple commercial device and can be used in the A380, it would then be available for other new aircraft without having to pass costly safety reviews.

That's why the industry is so adamant about squashing his claims, Mangan alleges. Airbus, owned by Dutch and British companies, surpassed Boeing in 2003 as the world's largest maker of airliners.

Mangan's attorney, Franz Karl Juraczka, advised him last spring to leave Austria before his legal problems snowballed. Mangan refused: "I wouldn't be able to live with myself if anything went wrong with that airplane."

Despite his ordeal, Mangan remains enthused about aerospace design. He can talk for hours about arcane subjects such as fluid dynamics with the same sense of excitement as a kid with a new toy.

Mangan was born in Ohio and grew up in San Jose, and he always had a fascination for science and technology, family members and friends said. When Apple introduced its first personal computer, the 12-year-old Mangan took apart the family's television set to try to build a PC for himself. He also made a satellite receiver out of coffee cans to try to get weather data from an orbiting satellite.

At 16, while still in high school, he got a part-time job at IBM in San Jose helping to design robotic manufacturing machines. He attended San Jose State University and the University of Massachusetts, but never received a college degree.

Later, while working for Honeywell on a military jet project, he came into contact with TTTech, a company founded by two professors in Vienna to market their computer chips.

They say the chips contain 20 times more memory than the processors currently used in aviation, while having half the electrical wiring required for data communication systems that oversee aircraft controls. The chips also can be used on the steering and braking systems of autos. Moreover, they would cut the cost of aviation chips to about $20 apiece, versus $500 for previous designs.

Mangan was drawn by the firm's potential. His future seemed bright in February 2004 when he was hired as chief engineer at a salary of $100,000, plus $25,000 in moving expenses. Diana Mangan packed up their three children — Shelley, now 12, Timothy and Jarrod, 6 — and they arrived in Vienna in the summer of 2004.

With its subsidized medical care and after-school-care programs, Austria looked like a great place to raise a family. And the family was pleased to discover that Vienna had a Baptist church.

Mangan began work on the chip for the A380's cabin-pressurization system.

Until the 1940s, commercial airplanes were not pressurized and could fly only at about 10,000 feet. Flying above the clouds, around 30,000 feet, would make flights smoother, but at that altitude a lack of oxygen and temperatures of 140 degrees below freezing would kill passengers within minutes.

Then Boeing launched its Stratoliner, the first passenger plane with a sealed cabin. Internal pressure was maintained by regulating the intake and outflow of air during flight. This breakthrough helped lead to the age of modern air travel.

Today, most airline passengers — besides experiencing mild popping in their ears — rarely notice that air inside the cabin is in constant flux as air is taken in through the engines and let out through the valves in the belly of the plane.

However, if the valves are stuck open the cabin can depressurize in seconds before anyone can don emergency oxygen masks. In most cases pilots have time to bring the plane down to a safe altitude, but several recent incidents have raised concerns.

Authorities suspect that cabin-pressure problems caused the August crash in Greece of Helios Airways' Boeing 737 in which all 121 aboard died. And investigators believe that an abrupt loss of cabin pressure may have led to the in-flight breakup of a China Airlines 747 in 2002, killing all 225 aboard.

Mangan said he found serious flaws early last year in TTTech's computer chips and the software for the A380's cabin-pressurization system, according to legal documents. The system was executing "unpredictable" commands when it received certain data, possibly causing the pressure valves to open accidentally.

Because all four motors in the A380's cabin-pressurization system use the same type of flawed TTTech chip, Mangan says, "if one fails, they all fail."

Yet his employer ignored his concerns, he alleges, because fixing the glitches would be costly, could take up to a year and would further delay the A380's launch. TTTech tried to cover up the defects and forged Mangan's signature on documents to suggest that the software passed internal tests and reviews, he alleges in court documents.

"Once they slip this onboard the A380, they can justify using it on all other aircraft," Mangan said.

Indeed, Boeing Co. has ordered TTTech's chips for the flight control system for its upcoming mid-size 787 Dreamliner. Boeing executives said they were unaware of any problems with TTTech's chips, but said further questions should be addressed by TTTech.

TTTech executives denied any wrongdoing. They said there had been a minor glitch but that it had been fixed.

Within days of firing Mangan last fall, TTTech sued him in civil court to try to force him to retract his statements to aviation authorities about the potential defect.

In contrast to the U.S. legal system, in Austria individuals can file criminal charges. A few weeks later TTTech also sued Mangan in criminal court.

Then, in December, a civil court issued an injunction barring Mangan from talking about his case.

By May, the family was short of cash, so Mangan returned to the U.S. to borrow money to help pay his legal bills, and while there he also set up an Internet blog to publicize his safety concerns about the new Airbus.

The Mangans developed a circle of Austrian friends at their church who were eager to help. When Mangan decided his first lawyer wasn't aggressive enough, the church referred him to attorney Juraczka, who agreed to represent him for free.

These days the family's living room looks like a legal library, holding Mangan's voluminous whistle-blower records. He wryly notes that the clutter prevented police from finding all of his documents during their search.

Throughout the family's ordeal, Mangan remained dogmatic about not being chased out of Austria and about standing up for what he believed in. Diana said that she wondered at times whether it might be better to move on, but that the family was "very supportive that it will all work out."

The Mangans live day to day, not sure what will come next. If they can't pay their rent, they hope to return to the U.S. to live with Diana's parents in Ohio, although they have maxed out their credit card and can't afford plane tickets.

Mangan is getting ready to file for personal bankruptcy.

TTTech has offered to drop its legal action against Mangan, court records show, and pay him three months of severance, if he retracts his statements. But Mangan has refused.

Mangan said he was looking for a new job. He has contacted dozens of aerospace firms in the U.S. and Europe, but none have returned his calls. "Nobody wants to touch me," he said.
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Old September 29th, 2005, 05:34 AM   #727
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.... Hmm that's just slightly disturbing.
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Old September 30th, 2005, 02:51 PM   #728
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Airbus takes delivery of first GP7200s engines for A380

Flight International online news 10:00GMT: Engine Alliance, a joint venture between GE Aircraft Engines and Pratt & Whitney, has delivered the first of its new GP7200 Airbus A380 powerplants to the European manufacturer.

Airbus will begin to install nacelle and aircraft system components from October, in preparation for the upcoming A380/GP7200 flight test programme.

The GP7200, which is competing with Rolls-Royce’s Trent 900, has won 58% of A380 engine selections announced to date, according the engine’s manufacturer. It will be initially certified to deliver 75,600lb (340kN) of thrust but has a potential capability of more than 80,000lbs.

That certification, which is planned for next month, is “progressing well”, says Engine Alliance. Tests, which are being conducted at GE and Pratt & Whitney facilities, have just passed the 5,000-cycle milestone.
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Old September 30th, 2005, 02:58 PM   #729
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15 September 2005
RIVER DEE DREDGING KEEPS A380 PROGRAMME ON TRACK.

The green light has been received to dredge the waterways out of Mostyn Docks to keep the water deep enough for the A380 wings to be loaded on a ship to transport them from the UK to France.

The Broughton-made A380 wings are transported singly by road and then river craft to Mostyn Docks, where they are loaded onto the specially-built roll-on, roll-off ship which takes them to France.

Dredging the channel waterways linking Mostyn Docks, in Wales, to the sea was required to allow the Airbus ship the “Ville de Bordeaux” to access the docks and pick up the A380 wings. Work on the 1500 metre-long (one mile) 60 to 80 metre-wide (180 to 210 ft) channel has already started.

Consent for the operation was granted to Mostyn Docks by the British transport Ministry, the Welsh Environment Agency and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) on August 16. The consent allows dredging over the next two years to a depth which will accommodate shipping of the A380 wings. Environmental effects of the dredging will be monitored.

By 2008, about 200 people will be working on the A380 logistics to make sure full production of the double-decker aircraft is on schedule.

The wings along with the fuselage sections and the horizontal tail plane are all shipped to Pauillac, near Bordeaux in France before being wheeled to the Final Assembly Hall in Toulouse on special trailers.


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Old October 1st, 2005, 12:30 AM   #730
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STR
Anyone else hear about this? Even if this guy's concerns are unfounded, it's awful how AI went after this guy and ruined his life.
Here's the homepage of the guy: http://www.eaawatch.net/index.html

What is a little bit strange about him is his confused style of writing, which is strange for a "manager" from whom I would expect a short and precise description of the allegations instead of unprecise allegations in all directions, endless repetitions, run-on sentences, links to documents without meaningful content, etc... This fact makes me a little bit cautious. I don't know if the guy can be believed, he might also be mentally ill. His style of writing is pretty similiar to people who suffer from mania.

Nevertheless here is a quote from his website about his motives:

"United Technologies Corporation of the United States business unit, Hamilton Sundstrand's subsidiary Nord Micro (UTC-HS-Nord Micro) and TTTech Computertechnik / North America Inc. (TTTech) in conspiracy and collusion, violated with impunity, government aircraft certification authority requirements, regulations, and policies intended to protect the safety of airline passengers.

In order to save substantial costs, in a program already millions of dollars over budget and a year behind schedule, the parties submitted "knowingly false claims and statements" in both verbal testimony and documentation submitted to AIRBUS, the French "Direction Générale de l'Aviation Civile" (DGAC), the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). UTC-HS-Nord Micro, having determined at the end of 2002, that it's product could not achieve the now "obviously incompatible" primary goals of achieving a "low cost" system thru the aggressive use of "high risk unproven technologies", chose to engage in fraud to evade compliance with government aircraft certification authority safety requirements legally mandating the performance of extensive testing and failure analysis, required by the aircraft certification authorities as proof that the design is safe for use on commercial aircraft.

The evasion of compliance with government safety requirements, has allowed the parties to hide from government regulators the existence of "life threatening" product design defects and intentional non-compliance with government safety regulations, which if discovered would result in a substantial delay in the aircraft certification approval of the AIRBUS A380, forcing delays in the delivery of aircraft, thereby triggering AIRBUS to pay substantial contract financial penalties to the airlines."
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Old October 1st, 2005, 10:59 PM   #731
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29 September 2005
NEW A380 ENGINE ALLIANCE ENGINES ARRIVE IN TOULOUSE

Engine Alliance delivers the first four GP7200 engines to Airbus in time for the certification campaign in early 2006.

The four GP7200 engines from American manufacturer Engine Alliance arrived in Toulouse from Middletown, Connecticut in the United States on September 29. This type of engines will equip the fifth A380 aircraft which will undergo a series of flight tests in the first quarter of 2006.

A380 customers can select the type of motorisation between the Rolls-Royce Trent 900 and the Engine Alliance GP7200 engines. The EA engines are fitted with specific instruments which will analyse more than 1,000 parameters during the flight tests.

The fan of the GP7200 engine has a diameter of 2,94 m (8.82ft) and will produce a 70,000 lbs (311kN*) power thrust on the A380 passenger version, against a 76,000 lbs (340kN) power thrust on the A380 freighter. This will provide best efficiency levels for fuel consumption, noise reduction and gas emissions.

Among the A380 customers who have chosen the Engine Alliance engines are Air France, Emirates, FedEx, ILFC and Korean Air.

Engine Alliance is a joint venture between General Electric Co. and Pratt & Whitney.

* Kilo Newton.


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Old October 14th, 2005, 11:29 PM   #732
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Oct 13, 2005
Mega jet to touch down at Changi in Nov
S'pore is first of three stops in Airbus A380's maiden test flight out of Europe

By Karamjit Kaur
Transport Correspondent

THE world's largest-ever passenger aircraft will touch down at Changi Airport next month on its maiden test flight out of Europe.

Singapore has been picked as the first of three stops on the trip for the Airbus A380, which will also touch down in Kuala Lumpur and Sydney.

Singapore Airlines will be the first carrier to put the massive new double-decker plane into operation.

SIA has ordered 10, with an option for another 15.

The first few are due to arrive here in November next year - eight months behind schedule - and will initially be put into service on SIA's 'kangaroo route' from London to Sydney.

Though the plane can carry as many as 555 passengers, SIA will configure its A380s with 480 seats.

Sources told The Straits Times that the giant bird will take off from the Airbus headquarters in Toulouse, France, in the first half of next month and make a 12-hour non-stop flight to Changi.

So far, the A380 has not flown more than five continuous hours.

Airports worldwide have been gearing up to welcome the new aircraft.

Changi Airport is pumping $68 million into airport infrastructure, including the installation of 19 gates and larger holding rooms capable of handling the A380 and its passengers.

The Asia tour is also a good opportunity for Airbus, which has come under fire recently after announcing delays in deliveries, to generate some positive publicity.

The aircraft was unveiled at a lavish event in Toulouse in January attended by French President Jacques Chirac, outgoing German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

Also at the event were the chiefs of 14 airlines that have between them ordered a total of 132 A380s. The airlines include Qantas, Lufthansa and Thai Airways.

Before the A380 can take to the skies commercially, several technical issues will need to be ironed out. Because of the turbulence generated by the aircraft's giant engines, a key area now being studied is how far other planes should fly behind the A380 during departure and arrival.

A working group, which includes representatives from Europe's Joint Aviation Authorities and the Federal Aviation Administration in the United States, will make recommendations to the International Civil Aviation Organisation by February next year.
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Old October 15th, 2005, 12:28 AM   #733
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Disturbing news instead, hope everything goes well for both parties
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Old October 16th, 2005, 08:35 PM   #734
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Airbus says it cannot meet demand for A380 superjumbo - report
10.16.2005, 12:31 AM

FRANKFURT (AFX) - European aircraft manufacturer Airbus cannot produce enough of its A380 superjumbos to satisfy heavy demand, commercial director John Leahy told German Sunday newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

'I could sell another 30 A380s between now and 2010 if we had the production capacity,' Leahy said.

Airbus, owned by the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Co and BAE Systems PLC of the UK, has taken 149 firm orders and 10 options from 16 clients for the A380, the largest commercial plane made yet.

The superjumbo, which can seat between 555 and 840 passengers, made its successful maiden test flight on April 27 and will fly its first long-haul test run to Asia and Australia next month.

In June, Airbus raised the aircraft's catalogue price by 10 mln usd to an average of 292 mln usd.

Singapore Airlines will be the first to receive the new model, with the first orders delivered in late 2006, following earlier production delays.
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Old October 16th, 2005, 08:39 PM   #735
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5 October 2005
EXTREME STATIC TESTS ON SCHEDULE

Extreme static testing on the A380 aircraft has now reached the halfway point. This means that more than 50 percent of all static tests needed for the certification campaign are complete.

Since June 2005, seven extreme static tests have been carried out on the A380 out of 12 designed for the campaign. The extreme static testing phase should run until the end of 2005.


While fatigue testing looks at how the aircraft behaves over a long period of time, full scale static tests study how the airliner’s main structure reacts under extreme circumstances and stress.


As part of the certification campaign, the A380 has to undergo a full campaign of maximum load testing. A 10-strong Airbus team supported by six operators from VAI Clecim who developed the testing installation and in association with 10 experts from the Toulouse Aeronautical Test Centre (CEAT) carried out more than 100 tests on the aircraft including about 40 flight calculation tests and 14 for certification, that is one every two days since November 2004.

Each of the maximum load tests recreates flight cycle conditions from ground, flight to landing and studies the stress caused to the aircraft’s structure.

The aim of the limit load campaign is to artificially manufacture the loads that could be exerted on the A380’s structure under highly critical in-service conditions. The extreme load testing phase will add 50 percent more stress on the A380’s structure, which is required for certification purposes.

A special 1,000-tonne rig was constructed in Toulouse to carry out the static tests, with more than 300 jacks, 2,815 loading points and 8,000 gauges. The tests campaign and rig are 33 percent larger than those required for the testing campaign on the A340 aircraft Family. By the end of the tests campaign, the wings will have been bent up around eight metres (about 25ft), which is 1.5 metres (about six feet) more than on the A340.

A further campaign involving voluntary damage done to the fuselage to see how they react to damages and cracks over time, will commence in 2006. It should be completed by the end of 2006 by two research margin tests during which the wing and the fuselage will be broken.


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Old October 16th, 2005, 08:41 PM   #736
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11 October 2005
FIRST CARBON “CUT” FOR THE A380 FREIGHTER

An important milestone in the development of the A380 Freighter was reached this month with the first carbon “cut” on the centre wing box.

The first carbon “cut” for the freighter version of the A380 has been carried out at the Airbus site in Nantes. It follows the first metal cut performed in April this year.


Work on the super freighter will carry on with subcomponent assembly of the airframe structure expected to begin in a few weeks.

The A380-800F will offer a 150 tonnes payload, 29 percent more than the current large freighters with a 2 600 km (1,400 nm) greater range at 10 400 km (5,600 nm).


Capable of carrying the full range of industry standard pallets and containers, the A380-800F will also accommodate special and heavy loads through the combination of its 4,27 m (168 inch) wide main deck cargo door and an industry standard peak loading of 51,8 kg/cm (290 lb/inch) over a greater length of the cargo deck than its nearest competitor.


The A380-800F will enter into service in 2008 with launch customers including Emirates Skycargo, FedEx Express, ILFC and UPS.
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Old October 17th, 2005, 07:18 PM   #737
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According to Airbus, the second A380 to fly, c/n 004, will take off tomorrow Tuesday 18th October.
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Old October 17th, 2005, 07:20 PM   #738
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1st A380, F-WWSA s/n 003 for SIA rolls out....

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Old October 17th, 2005, 07:23 PM   #739
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Airbus says it cannot meet demand for A380 superjumbo

Airbus says it cannot meet demand for A380 superjumbo.

The European aircraft manufacturer Airbus cannot produce enough of its A380 superjumbos to satisfy heavy demand, its commercial director said.

"I could sell another 30 A380s between now and 2010 if we had the production capacity," John Leahy told German Sunday newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Airbus said on Saturday.

The European producer has taken 149 firm orders and 10 options from 16 clients for the A380, the largest commercial plane made yet.

The superjumbo, which can seat between 555 and 840 passengers, made its successful maiden test flight on April 27 and will fly its first long-haul test run to Asia and Australia next month.

In June, Airbus raised the aircraft's catalogue price by 10 million dollars to an average of 292 million dollars (242 million euros).

Singapore Airlines will be the first to receive the new model, with the first orders delivered in late 2006, following earlier production delays.

With Airbus and rival US manufacturer Boeing locked in a transatlantic trade dispute over aviation subsidies, the French government has criticized as unreasonable a US safety review of the A380, which could recommend greater distances around the super-jumbo for fear of slipstream turbulence.
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Old October 17th, 2005, 07:34 PM   #740
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Known A380 Seat Layouts

Known A380 Seat Layouts:

Seats:
..................F......J....Y+...Y....Total

AF...............9.....80...0....451..540
EK (1)..........?.....?.....0.....?.....489
EK (2)..........?.....?.....0.....?.....517
EK (3)..........0.....?.....0.....?.....644
QF...............?.....?.....?.....?.....501
SQ...............?.....?.....?.....?.....480
Kingfisher......?.....?.....?.....?.....496
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