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Old March 7th, 2014, 12:55 AM   #41
redstarcastles
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Generally they work very well, impressive at 100 mph on the Cork line when the track is good! They have reconfigured the sets into 3,4 and 5 coach sets. Some info here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IE_22000_Class

Some pictures here:

http://transportsceneireland.smugmug...ilSceneIreland


22323 Connolly 5 July 2013


22350 Kilkenny 3 August 2013
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Old April 19th, 2014, 04:09 PM   #42
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From Irish Times:

Quote:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/envir...nnel-1.1749501

Transport plan costing €900m includes reopening of Phoenix Park tunnel
4th April 2014



Largest share of expenditure will fund completion of the Luas Cross City line

The disused Phoenix Park tunnel is to be reopened for rail services under a transport plan for Dublin that will cost nearly €900 million to implement over the next five years.

The largest single share of capital expenditure under the plan will fund completion of the Luas Cross City line, linking St Stephen’s Green with Broombridge, Cabra, on which work is already under way.

The two projects are key elements of the final version of a scheme for public transport in the capital, published yesterday by the National Transport Authority (NTA).

Bypassing Heuston

Funding up to 2016 is included as part of the Coalition’s overall capital plan while resources for the remaining two years (2017 and 2018) “will be addressed in the next national capital investment plan”.

Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar said reopening the Phoenix Park tunnel had the potential to “significantly improve rail commuter services from Kildare and the west and southwest of the city”.

Reopening the route, which once carried the Belfast Enterprise train to Cork, would allow some commuter trains to bypass Heuston Station and head for Connolly Station, via a loop through Cabra.

The plan also aims to improve services, including greater integration of all public transport modes “through ticketing and fares, customer information, complementary services and improved accessibility”.

Three proposed bus rapid transit routes are to be “designed in detail and brought through the requisite statutory processes”, although construction is “contingent” on future funding being made available.

On buses, there is to be more investment in the fleet, with a continuous programme of vehicle replacement, better bus stops and shelters, and more widespread real-time passenger information.

On rail, the programme includes completion of a long-promised city centre resignalling project, to relieve a “bottleneck” at Connolly Station and allow more commuter trains to run at peak periods.

There will also be a “significant investment” in the growing network of cycle lanes, safety measures for pedestrians and cyclists as well as “enhancements” of the Leap Card and “additional products”.

NTA chief executive Gerry Murphy said the authority “will maintain a significant differential between Leap Card payments and cash payments” so that card would “always enjoy a much cheaper fare”.

Investment agenda

Mr Varadkar warned that a return to congestion would “seriously undermine our recovery and stunt economic and employment growth”.

Hence, the importance of continuing to invest in public transport.

The plan sets out “key principles” to guide how land is developed for residential and commercial uses and states it will be “vital” that these principles underpin zoning decisions.
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Old June 18th, 2014, 05:39 PM   #43
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From RailStaff:

Quote:
http://www.railstaff.co.uk/2014/06/1...eann-overcome/

Iarnród Éireann - A crisis to be overcome
17 Jun 2014



With the Minister of Transport talking hard ball about the cost of running Iarnród Éireann, Tim Casterton asked David Franks, the company’s CEO, how he would seek to manage the situation and what positive steps could be taken to bring Ireland’s rail network through the current financial crisis.

In May Ireland’s Transport Minister, Leo Varadkar, said he would consider imposing financial cuts on Irish Rail as the company’s current drain on the public finance was unsustainable (this despite a 30% reduction in PSO funding since 2008). Talk abounded of a mass closure of rural routes and services being cut back on main lines.

Are these simply a means of focusing thoughts on future requirements for the railway and what Ireland is prepared to pay for? Or is there a deeper agenda? Is there a way through this that could bring a stronger company out the other side?

David started off by explaining the background. ‘Iarnród Éireann just has to cut costs as there are not the funds available to continue with operational costs at current level. Key to this has to be the pay deal.’ Staff and managers are currently being asked to accept pay cuts. ‘It’s a hard thing to ask of your loyal work force at any time. They are being asked to accept a reduction of 1.75% while the deal for management is up to 6.1%.’

It’s obviously a very difficult situation to sell. Franks is certain that staff are aware of the current financial disaster that has hit Ireland. ‘I see an overall positive approach within the country to get on and try and resolve the issues rather than going down similar routes to countries such as Greece or Portugal.

The Public Sector employees in Ireland have been forced to take cuts. However we are considered to be ‘semi-state’ and the government isn’t able to enforce cuts. We are fortunate that the 2008 levels of pay remain in force as well and this has greatly helped.’ As in other railway companies such as Network Rail, voluntary severance has been used to help reduce the Iarnród Éireann pay bill.

Consultation and negotiation with the Trade Unions has been a priority in recent months. David explains, ‘The proposals have been referred to the Labour Relations Commission for a recommendation to be made – that’s the Irish equivalent of ACAS.



Historically, with other industries once this process was done, the recommendation was put to the unions and accepted, but last year both Bus Éireann and Dublin Bus were given recommendations by the Labour Court and in both instances, the situation ended up with an industrial dispute and short strikes. I’m doing the utmost to avoid this with Iarnród Éireann as it would cause even further damage.’

Regrettably for Iarnród Éireann, a few days after my conversation with David around 1,700 members of the union SIPTU participated in a ballot and very narrowly voted to reject the Labour Court recommendation with a 51% to 49% split. SIPTU has now advised that their Iarnród Éireann members will be balloted on strike and industrial action which will be undertaken if any attempt to implement changes to workers’ terms and conditions of employment without agreement is made.

TSSA voted 72% in favour of accepting the Labour Court recommendations, whilst at the time of writing, members of two other unions have still to conduct ballots. Both Iarnród Éireann and Minister for Transport, Leo Varadkar, have expressed disappointment with the outcome of the SIPTU ballot and advised that failure to reach agreement is likely to result in redundancies within the company and possible line closures.

Says David Franks, ‘Although the pay deal within Iarnród Éireann was crucial, it alone wouldn’t resolve the financial situation as the gap is just simply too great. It’s a part of a package which includes constraint, other efficiencies, service levels and of course the level of subvention we get from the Government.”

Track Record

‘Last year we delivered on our budget. It was tough, but we did it. The targets we’ve been set for this year will be even more demanding. Several types of grant have now been removed and this makes setting the budget even more of a challenge. At present I’ve a huge headache to try and find funding to cover some of the operational and maintenance expenditure required this year.’

With all this talk of financial crisis abounding, it is worth looking at the Iarnród Éireann annual report for 2013 to see how the company performed and despite the doom and gloom, it’s actually quite impressive to see what has been achieved on the financial front.

Costs were reduced by €25 million on a ‘like for like’ basis (excluding ‘one off’ savings achieved in 2012).

Train kilometres operated increased by 0.5 million km despite a reduction of €8.7 million in Public Service Obligation (PSO) payments and a 6.1% reduction in staff (261 fewer) – this being the lowest ever staff numbers.

The train operating costs have been reduced by an impressive 16.6% per kilometre.

Passenger numbers remained about static, but freight tonnage increased by 4% and revenue across all operations increased by €8.3m (4.4%).

Both the safety and PSO targets were achieved on all routes.

The wholly owned port of Rosslare Europort increased its surplus to €2.1 million, with an increase in freight units of 4.5 per cent.

These achievements are certainly impressive, particularly bearing in mind that the economy has been in recession.

Taking up the challenge

David Franks was appointed as CEO at Iarnród Éireann in February 2013. ‘When I started here I soon appreciated that we were very good at cost controls, but not as good at growing revenue. Previously voluntary severance had in many instances hit the wrong areas of workforce – revenue protection being one with many ticket office staff and revenue protection staff having left. I saw that one ‘quick fix’ would be to reduce ticketless travel so I set about getting resources reallocated to re-build the Revenue Protection team and, on regular occasions, getting the office-based staff out supporting them. Ticket checks are now up by 25% and around 40% more Penalty Fares are being issued. An independent survey was recently undertaken and it shows a big decrease in ticketless travel. I can feel that the first green shoots of a recovery are happening – we can see slight increases in passenger numbers now with the last quarter of 2013 being up. The first quarter of 2014 showed a 2% revenue increase.’

‘The fortunes of the different sectors within the company vary with Commuting, which includes the DART, taking the lead with improving results. I’m not sure why we still refer to the DART separately! There are clear signs that people are starting to ‘get back to work’ with some revenue increases, but the income is still a bit up and down. One thing that we are particularly good at is getting people to and from events.’

David’s comment here is borne out by the recent popular ‘One Direction’ concerts held in Dublin which saw services being very well utilised and bringing in that vital boost to the fare box. Sporting events also generate additional revenue for the company with travel to the huge Dublin stadia.

Whilst most of this is Dublin-based, a side line that is paying well in Cork is the increased numbers of cruise liners calling into Cobh. With the port being adjacent to the station the use of rail to access Cork city centre is generating opportunities with additional services being provided on the commuter branch.

‘Inter-City hasn’t been performing so well and this is mainly down to competition from the new motorways constructed during the ‘Celtic Tiger’ years when money seemed to be no problem. Although we attracted investment in the rail network at the same time, it was mostly concentrated on new routes rather than improving the line speeds on the Inter-City routes to make them compete more effectively.

Another priority I had here was to get passengers back onto services and this has been achieved with special promotional fares. On the Cork to Dublin route recently a €9.99 offer resulted in a 40% passenger increase. However what we have to ensure now is that having tempted these customers back to retry the service, they keep an interest in travelling by rail. Our passenger fleet is now one of the most modern in Europe with Wi-Fi being available on all trains so that passengers on the journey can use the time for working, catching up on e-mails or simply just to browse the internet.’

Freight



Having been for many years the poor relation on IÉ, freight is now becoming the rising star. ‘During 2013 we recorded a 4% increase with freight tonnage. I see freight as an opportunity that we can use to claw in additional revenue, especially as much of the network is controlled centrally and there is rarely cost involved in opening up lines for an additional train path.

On the (main) network I see passenger trains as covering all the network costs and freight should only be charged on a marginal basis; however on the few freight-only lines such as Drogheda to Navan, the costs must be covered. Freight must pay its way. To improve the viability of freight we are currently looking at how access to the network is charged, as at present all are charged the same rate. I don’t consider that the charges that we apply to passenger services are also right for freight and we may be able to reduce them.’

Another long time issue with freight customers has been the relatively short formations permitted on the network with 18 bogie container wagons being the current maximum. The problem with much of the network being single track is the length of passing loops. Even on double track routes, passing loops may not be of sufficient length.

Says David, ‘I’ve asked the team to look at where train lengths could be significantly extended. Freight train paths could be designed to give a through run so that the use of loops isn’t required.’ One possible solution here could be operating overnight when passenger trains are not running.

One key bulk freight flow is the zinc ore from Navan to Dublin Port. Franks had good news. ‘The Tara Mines have now had their licence extended so that traffic will continue.’ The traffic generates three weekday trains on the Northern Line.

Intermodal trains on the network are buoyant and currently centre on County Mayo with the Ballina freight yard handling nine arrivals and departures each week. International Warehousing and Transport (IWT) now operate seven weekly services in each direction to and from the Dublin Port private sidings now that agreement has been reached to operate an additional service on Saturdays. DFDS runs two trains to and from Waterford Port each week to connect with its Rotterdam-bound container ship. Ballina and Westport also handle timber trains that operate to Waterford.

‘In the future we are also keen that with biomass becoming important, freight can transport it.’ At present a new biomass electricity generation plant is under construction in Mayo a few miles from Ballina and this would require a regular source of fuel to operate.

‘We are also currently carrying out a study to look at opening up the long time mothballed Foynes branch for the Shannon Foynes Port Company on a ‘cheap and cheerful’ basis. At some future point it is also likely that the mining of zinc ore in the Limerick area could commence and that, similar to the ore from Navan, would be an ideal source of freight.’

David’s Message

David Franks’ message to staff and stakeholders is uncompromising but optimistic. ‘It’s going to be tough, but Iarnród Éireann can get through this.’
It is clear that there really is a financial squeeze greater than seen for a long time, but with the outlook for business in most key areas of the network looking quite positive at present, I think the CEO is right and Iarnród Éireann will get through and come out all the stronger.
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Old June 20th, 2014, 02:10 AM   #44
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Some pictures from the recent past

When trains were orange and black:


079 Drogheda 9 August 2008


173 Heuston 5 April 2008


226 Adamstown 26 May 2007

More here:
http://smu.gs/1uHwk7d
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Old July 8th, 2014, 04:16 PM   #45
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From Rail Journal:

Quote:
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=542

Irish Rail reverses passenger decline
Tuesday, July 08, 2014



AFTER years of decline in the wake of the economic crisis, passenger numbers on Irish Rail (IE) services are finally showing signs of recovery, according to the company's preliminary figures for the first half of this year, which were released on July 7.

First half ridership rose by 2.7% to 18.3 million, compared with 17.8 million in the first six months of 2013. Intercity services saw the highest growth with passenger numbers increasing 5% from 3.8 million to 4 million, with a 7% year-on-year increase recorded on the key Dublin – Cork route. IE attributes growth in long-distance traffic to promotional fares, an increase in business travel due to improving economic conditions, and sustained high levels of student travel.

Commuter ridership in the Cork area and on non-electrified routes radiating from Dublin climbed 3.6% from 6.2 to 6.4 million, while Dublin's Dart electrified commuter network saw a more modest 0.8% increase with passenger numbers reaching 7.9 million.

IE says it expects to see continued growth in passenger numbers in the remaining six months of this year. However the company's financial situation is still extremely poor and unions are balloting their members over strike action in response to proposed cutbacks
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Old August 4th, 2014, 12:55 PM   #46
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Some heritage action from the south

Folks,

Apart from push-pull loco services on the Dublin - Cork and Dublin - Belfast lines, all other intercity routes in Ireland are served by DMUs since BR Mark 3 coaches were finally displaced by Rotem InterCity Railcars in 2009. This has led to the return of diesel-hauled heritage trains, run by the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland (who mainly run steam excursions) and the Irish Railway Record Society.

Here are a few shots from a recent trip using 071 Class diesel haulage and 1960s-vintage Cravens coaches.

1. Waterford station has had its infrastructure significantly cut back since a landslide on 31.12.2013 damaged the signalling infrastructure. In its heyday, Waterford had six passenger platforms, but this has now been reduced to a single bay platform (shown here). This platform, and the now freight-only through track under the signal box to Belview Port are all that remain. The main platform can now no longer be reached, and all points and crossings have been removed. Entry to Waterford is now controlled by Waterford West cabin. This has led to the demise of the last section of Absolute Block signalling in Ireland, as Waterford Central has been abolished as a Block Post, and the Waterford - Waterford West section now consists of two sidings.

In this photo, you can see the gantry-mounted signal box, which spans the the through lines leading to Belview port, and the closed lines to New Ross and Rosslare Strand. The landslide was from the cliff face you can see behind it.

The train is formed by a 2,450 hp Class 071, number 078, an ex-BR Mark 1 steam/generator van, and a rake of Cravens coaches, which are standing in the one remaining operational platform in Waterford.
IMG_7177 by csd75, on Flickr

2. After Waterford, we headed west on the Waterford - Limerick line. As run-round is only possible in Waterford freight yard, a fresh loco was attached to what was the rear of the train, which brought us to Limerick.

Here at Carrick-on-Suir, we can see this loco, 079, which has yet to receive an overhaul and repaint into the new freight livery.
IMG_7223 by csd75, on Flickr

3. A view of the signal box at Carrick-on-Suir. Until earlier this year, it was possible to cross trains here, but the loop was removed in May as the points were life-expired and there was no money to replace them. Carrick remains a block post, so a token exchange took place here. This means it's possible to dispatch two trains towards Clonmel from Waterford in the same direction, but crossing with trains in the opposite direction from Limerick Junction can now only happen at Tipperary and Clonmel.
IMG_7218 by csd75, on Flickr

4. Our train waiting at Clonmel station. Here you can see the lower quadrant semaphore signals used on the Waterford - Tipperary section of the line. The three block sections using Harper's instruments and miniature Electric Train Staffs are Waterford West - Carrick-on-Suir (no loop), Carrick - Clonmel, and Clonmel - Tipperary. Tipperary - Limerick Junction now uses modern signalling since the Junction was resignalled a few years ago.

Our signal is "off", so we are clear to proceed. There's still time for a few more photos though!
IMG_7235 by csd75, on Flickr

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Old August 4th, 2014, 02:05 PM   #47
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Heritage part 2: Limerick & the Nenagh branch

(Continued)

Moving on to Limerick and the secondary branch line serving Nenagh.

1. Limerick is the terminal station for services from Dublin (every two hours, most change at Limerick Junction, but some are direct), Waterford (two per day), Galway (seven per day), and Ballybrophy via Nenagh (two per day). Limerick and Cork are the last of the main terminal stations that haven't been upgraded to computer-based signalling. Although the signals themselves are colour-light, control is via a mechanical interlock in Limerick cabin.

A third loco, number 074, was attached here to bring us back to Dublin using the secondary route via Nenagh (as opposed to the main route via Limerick Junction).
IMG_7257 by csd75, on Flickr

2. Situated at the end of a double track section to Limerick, Killonan signal cabin controls a level crossing, and entrance to the Nenagh branch from the Limerick side. The branch is single track, with two ETS sections: Killonan - Birdhill, Birdhill - Roscrea, and a manual staff between Roscrea and Ballybrophy, the junction with the Cork main line.

The signalman has just handed our driver the ETS staff for the Killonan - Birdhill section, and is returning to his cabin to open the level crossing gates to road traffic. The mainline to Limerick Junction is to the right and behind the train, and is controlled by CTC in Connolly station, Dublin.
IMG_7259 by csd75, on Flickr

3. Birdhill station, first block post on the Nenagh branch heading from Limerick. The driver here has stopped short of the platform end to allow photographers to get a better shot. Here you can see that Birdhill has a passing loop (to the right of the train) and a short siding (on the left). The signal cabin is visible to the right, and the signals protecting the Killonan - Birdhill section are visible in the distance.
IMG_7273 by csd75, on Flickr

4. Cravens interior. These coaches were introduced in 1963, and lasted in regular service until December 2006. Several have now been preserved by the RPSI, and see use on special trains such as this. More details on Wikipedia.
IMG_7302 by csd75, on Flickr

5. Castleconnell station has no loop and a single platform. Facilities here are pretty basic; the station building is no longer in use, and tickets are sold on the train.

The generator/steam heating van and the first four Cravens carriages are in the livery they used in Irish Rail service between 1987 and 2006. The final three carriages have been repainted into an RPSI blue livery.
IMG_7293 by csd75, on Flickr

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Old August 4th, 2014, 02:35 PM   #48
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Heritage part 4: shunting at Ballybrophy

Ballybrophy is a junction station on the Cork/Dublin main line, giving access to the Nenagh branch from this end. A ground frame controls access to the Nenagh branch to and from the main line, so usually trains will terminate in the bay platform at Ballybrophy, and passengers will transfer to another train on the main line platforms. However in this case, our train shunted from the Nenagh branch bay out onto the main line and across into the loop platform on the Down side (platform 4, visible on the extreme right of photo 1).

1. Our train in the bay platform, which serves the Nenagh branch to Limerick. The tracks in the foreground are the Dublin/Cork main line, and we're looking north towards Dublin. You can see railway staff in hi-vis vests calling CTC for permission to operate the ground frame and allow the train to propel (reverse) out onto the main line.
IMG_7308 by csd75, on Flickr

2. A closer view of the rear of the train. Note the double-headed signal. The right-hand head is controlled by CTC in Dublin, and has cleared the main line for a service train. Once this has passed, the left-hand head will clear to green when the ground frame is used to set the route from the Nenagh bay out to the main line.
IMG_7304 by csd75, on Flickr

3. Our train has reversed out onto the main line, and is now waiting for the road to be set to the loop platform at Ballybrophy. The line to Limerick via Nenagh is visible curving off to the left.
IMG_7314 by csd75, on Flickr

4. We now draw forwards into the loop platform while a service train, the 1705 Dublin Heuston - Tralee waits at the Down Home signal.
IMG_7321 by csd75, on Flickr

5. Approaching the platform, the IRRS board is clearly visible, denoting a special being run by the Irish Railway Records Society.
IMG_7339 by csd75, on Flickr

6. The 1705 Heuston - Tralee can now access platform 2 now that the IRRS train has cleared the main line. The train is formed of a 5-car Premier class ICR, which includes a first class section and a buffet car.
IMG_7371 by csd75, on Flickr

7. Old and new: 45 years separate the entry into service of this rolling stock.
IMG_7375 by csd75, on Flickr

8. After running around the train, our loco eases onto the coaching stock to couple up once more. Irish coaching stock used screw couplers, so a shunter is required to manually couple trains and reconnect brake hoses. Once a common sight at terminal stations, this procedure is now only required for special heritage trains such as this. All service trains are now either EMU/DMU or push-pull.
IMG_7397 by csd75, on Flickr

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Old August 15th, 2014, 07:15 PM   #49
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From Global Rail News:

Quote:
http://www.globalrailnews.com/2014/0...r-train-fleet/

EU funding for Belfast-Dublin cross-border train fleet
15 AUG, 2014



The European Union has set aside €21.5 million to improve cross-border rail services in Ireland.

The majority of the money, €15.2 million, will fund a substantial upgrade of the Belfast-Dublin Enterprise fleet – a programme that will involve a mechanical overhaul, new interiors, a new livery, new passenger information systems and a new CCTV system.

...
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Old September 11th, 2014, 08:55 PM   #50
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Wonderful timelapse of new bridge across Royal Canal near Broomsbridge station. This is the part of elimination rail crossing at Ratoath Road. Here is the describtion:

Quote:
The Ratoath Road, Realignment and Over-bridge Project commenced in June 2013 and will be fully completed in early 2015, closing one of the busiest manually operated rail level crossings on the Iarnród Éireann network. The €9.8 million Iarnród Éireann project has been developed in co-operation with Dublin City Council and is funded by the National Transport Authority.

The bridge span is 70m with a width of 15.4m to the outside of the steelwork. The Steel structure was manufactured by Horta Coslada in Madrid. The weight of the lift is approximately 330 tonnes comprising approximately 305 tonnes of structural steel work with an additional 25 tonnes of tackle and hook block. The weight of the overall bridge is approximately 1620 tonnes including structural steel, structural concrete, pavement, parapets and finishes. The Crane which will be used to lift the bridge into position has come in by sea from the UK.

The new bridge will, in tandem with other planned projects, allow for future increased capacity on the rail line for train services. It will also eliminate major road congestion at the crossing, with 107 trains passing through the level crossing each day, including up to 55 services at peak times causing constant traffic queues while the gates are closed.

The project will link the Ratoath Road from a point approximately 300 metres south of the existing level crossing to the Ballyboggan Road junction to the north. Works include the construction of 500 metres of road, a bridge over the railway and canal and a junction with the Ballyboggan Road.

The new bridge will greatly help with the traffic flow on the Ratoath Road which provides a very widely used north-south connection from the North Inner City and Cabra to Finglas. Increased traffic and pedestrian safety together with the reduction in traffic congestion in the area will enable improved accessibility and linkages at peak and off peak times for work, shopping and leisure purposes. The road will also provide a much needed improvement to pedestrian and cycle facilities along this section of the Ratoath Road.

Last edited by dimlys1994; September 14th, 2014 at 03:35 PM.
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Old October 18th, 2014, 08:30 PM   #51
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From Global Rail News:

Quote:
http://www.globalrailnews.com/2014/1...rator-in-2015/

No additional funding for Irish rail operator in 2015
17 OCT, 2014



The Irish Government will not make further cuts to rail funding in 2015, Transport Minister Paschal Donohoe has announced.

The news that public funding for rail and bus services will be maintained at €210 million next year will be received relatively well by national rail operator Iarnród Éireann (Irish Rail) which has seen the government’s Public Service Obligation (PSO) payments fall by almost 40 per cent since 2008.

Irish Rail has been recording successive losses since the start of the financial crisis and earlier this year it announced a €16.4 million loss in 2013

...
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Old October 19th, 2014, 12:35 PM   #52
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How much of Irish Rail's losses can be attributed to Running uneconomic routes like Galway-Limerick, Limerick-Waterford etc...
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Old October 20th, 2014, 10:41 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callagg2 View Post
How much of Irish Rail's losses can be attributed to Running uneconomic routes like Galway-Limerick, Limerick-Waterford etc...
As far as I remember, those routes were closed and re-opened only a few
years ago. I even don't know whether it's already re-opened as far as Galway. Why has it been re-opened if it is not economic to operate ? If
the re-opening has been made at the request of the government, why does
not Irish Rail state that it will not continue to operate it if it does not receive
the appropriate funding ?
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Old November 6th, 2014, 05:50 PM   #54
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From Rail Journal:

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Belmond to launch Irish luxury train
Thursday, November 06, 2014



HOTEL and luxury travel operator Belmond has announced plans to launch a luxury train which will tour the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland from mid-2016

Belmond has acquired 10 Mk3 coaches from Irish Rail (IE), which will be converted into a luxury sleeper train by IE at its Inchicore workshops in Dublin. The Belmond Grand Hibernian will be formed of two restaurant cars, an observation car and sleeper cars accommodating up to 40 passengers in 20 en-suite cabins. Four cabins will be interconnected to accommodate families.

Interior design is being carried out by James Park Associates, Britain, and Belmond says it is seeking to "draw inspiration from Dublin's classic Georgian architecture and blend it with elements of Ireland's ancient folklore and traditions."

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Old January 3rd, 2015, 11:43 AM   #55
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DART at Bray Head

Hugging the cliff-side and skirting the Irish Sea, the section of railway between Bray and Greystones south of Dublin is particularly scenic.

The wires were extended south to Greystones, and DART replaced DMU service to the seaside town in 2000. With the exception of the Bray - Greystones section, the DART system is double-track throughout.

This shot shows a four-car 8510 class EMU on a northbound service as it passes MP13.5 and a 50 mph (80 km/h) Permanent Speed Restriction on the southern approaches to Bray. The mileposts here are measured from the long-closed Dublin Harcourt Street station. Also visible is the Outer Home signal for Bray, showing a Proceed aspect.

DART Bray Head by csd75, on Flickr

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Old January 6th, 2015, 08:58 PM   #56
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From Rail Journal:

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Irish Rail ridership returns to growth
Tuesday, January 06, 2015



FOLLOWING several years of decline in the wake of the global economic crisis, passenger numbers on Ireland's railway network are finally growing again according to the latest figures from Irish Rail (IE), which show overall ridership increased by 2.5% in 2014 to 37.6 million journeys

Intercity ridership rose 3.7% year-on-year to 8.4 million, while Commuter and Dublin area Dart services witnessed a 2.1% increase in passenger numbers, which reached 29.3 million.

The strongest growth was on the Limerick – Galway line, which has suffered disappointing levels of traffic since the reopening of the Ennis – Athenry section of the Western Rail Corridor in 2009. Ridership on this route increased by 75% to 50,000, which IE attributes to the introduction of online booking and promotional fares.

On Intercity routes, Dublin – Galway saw the strongest growth, with passenger numbers increasing 6.4% to 1.1 million, while there was a 4.1% rise on the Dublin – Sligo route, which carried 1.2 million passengers.

IE says growth has been driven by a rise in promotional activity, with a substantial increase in online bookings and student travel, together with improving economic conditions, major events, and closer integration with other modes
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Old January 7th, 2015, 12:09 PM   #57
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Nice pics very great place for travelling...........................
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Old January 27th, 2015, 10:18 AM   #58
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From Rail Journal:

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http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=537

IE mulls Dublin Airport rail link
Monday, January 26, 2015



IRISH Rail (IE) has confirmed it is developing proposals for a direct rail link to Dublin Airport, which would be served by direct Intercity services to Cork, Galway, and Belfast

In an interview with the Irish Independent newspaper on January 26, IE CEO Mr David Franks said the project, which is already being considered by the Department of Transport, would involve constructing a branch running west from a junction with the Dublin – Drogheda – Belfast line at Clongriffin. In a second phase, the line could be extended north to serve the suburb of Swords before continuing northeast to rejoin the Dublin – Belfast Line

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Old February 21st, 2015, 07:17 PM   #59
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Grade separation of Ratoath Road level crossing in North Dublin is almost complete, opening should be soon:

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Old April 9th, 2015, 06:00 PM   #60
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From Rail Journal:

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Irish Rail ridership recovery continues
Thursday, April 09, 2015



PASSENGER traffic on Ireland's railways continued to recover in the first quarter of this year according to figures released by Irish Rail (IE) on April 9, which show ridership in the first three months of 2015 increased by 3.8% compared with the same period last year

The strongest increase was on Dublin's Dart suburban network, which saw passenger numbers climb 6.1% to 3.69 million. Intercity ridership rose by 2.1% to 2.36 million, while the commuter sector carried 2.76 million passengers, a 2.2% increase.

IE attributes this growth to a number of factors, including fares initiatives for holders of the Leap Card contactless smartcard; promotional activities including online and student markets; continued participation in the Taxsaver scheme for commuters, which saw 4% year-on-year growth; and the recovery of the Irish economy

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