daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Stadiums and Sport Arenas

Stadiums and Sport Arenas » Completed | Under Construction | Proposed | Demolished



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 13th, 2012, 09:43 AM   #141
JJG
Registered User
 
JJG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 3,422
Likes (Received): 1048

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scba View Post
Is this a troll thread?
Quite possibly...
JJG está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 13th, 2012, 10:05 AM   #142
diablo234
Oh No He Didn't
 
diablo234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 5,297

I don't know what planet the OP is on but there are on but there are several stadiums/arenas in the US that are quite innovative design wise. The University of Phoenix Stadium for example even had an entire article dedicated to it in Architectural Record magazine.
diablo234 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2012, 10:16 AM   #143
JimB
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 11,022
Likes (Received): 4813

Silly thread.

The U.S. has incredible stadiums. There isn't a country on earth (including my home, the UK) which doesn't wish that it had even half as good a stadium infrastructure as the U.S.

The Bird's Nest isn't a perfect example of stadium architecture around the world at all. It is unique - and incredibly expensive (given that it was built in China). You will see nothing like it anywhere else.

99.9 % of new stadiums being built around the world currently are very samey. U.S. stadiums, in my opinion, are much more imaginative and individual (not least because the shape of a baseball stadium is so unique). I also like the way that many of them emphasise their urban location by allowing for fantastic views of downtown buildings.

Lastly, it seems to me that the OP places a ridiculous emphasis on cosmetic, exterior values rather than what really matters in a stadium - the interior.

P.S. Wasn't the New Meadowlands stadium's design a compromise between what the Jets and the Giants wanted? Would explain the blandness that the OP complains about. It's not a common problem in the U.S.
JimB no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2012, 02:28 PM   #144
nomarandlee
My Mind Has Left My Body
 
nomarandlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: 1060 W. Addison, City by the Lake
Posts: 7,209
Likes (Received): 2762

Quote:
Originally Posted by rantanamo View Post
I just think the OP doesn't have much knowledge of US stadiums or world stadiums really. I could say most places don't take many chances. Japan is truly the risk taker of any great number. Elsewhere in the world there really aren't that many chances.
In terms of stadiums or more generally? If confined to stadiums I have to say I find Japanese stadiums and ballparks to be rather mundane in design compared to European and American stadiums.
__________________
Stephane Charbonnier, “I'd rather die standing up than live on my knees.”
nomarandlee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2012, 06:54 PM   #145
will101
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: silicon valley or Salem
Posts: 4,830
Likes (Received): 1569

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scba View Post
Is this a troll thread?
My vote would be Yes.
will101 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2012, 08:58 PM   #146
rantanamo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 3,507
Likes (Received): 353

Quote:
Originally Posted by nomarandlee View Post
In terms of stadiums or more generally? If confined to stadiums I have to say I find Japanese stadiums and ballparks to be rather mundane in design compared to European and American stadiums.
Just look at the International Ballparks thread. Look at Super Saitama Stadium. Toyota Stadium's roof. Oita Eye, Sapporo Dome, Osaka Dome, Mazda Stadium. There's some truly different stuff. Not just different from the rest of the world, but also different from other Japanese stadiums. There's nothing like a lot of these stadiums. The bowls are smaller, but there are lots of flowing, less segmented designs than their world counterparts.

Osaka Dome





Oita Stadium Big Eye





Sapporo Dome



Tokyo Dome





Shellcom Sendai



Komatsu Dome





that's just a taste. The thread is about taking chances. Those are some chance taking designs and there are many more.
rantanamo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2012, 09:19 PM   #147
JJG
Registered User
 
JJG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 3,422
Likes (Received): 1048

I'm not knocking, but some of those Japanese stadiums look like altered versions of Texas Stadium, Cowboys Stadium, Reliant, U of Phoenix Stadium and Mall of America Field...
JJG está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 04:43 AM   #148
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6268

China:

Nantong Stadium




Tianjin Sports Center









Changzhou Olympic Sports Center







Shanghai Oriental Aquatic















Quanzhou City Straits






Huizhou Olympic





Jinan Olympic











Shanghai Arena



image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr





Guangzhou Gymnasium





[img]http://*************************/images/jpgs/guangzhou/guangzhou_opera_house_z280211_v2.jpg[/img]








Shanghai Tennis Stadium - opens like a flower















*

Shenzhen Universiade















Shenzhen Bay Sports Center

















Shenzhen Stadium

image hosted on flickr





soon to come: Harbin superstadium design (tower and stadium combined)











Guangzhou new stadium




Dalian








Rest of the world:

National Stadium, Brasilia, Brazil





Cape Town Stadium, South Africa









Soccer City, Johannesburg, South Africa






Nelson Mandela Stadium, Port Elizabeth, South Africa






Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban, South Africa






Kaohsiung solar powered stadium, Taiwan

image hosted on flickr




Allianz Arena, Munich




London Velodrome


image hosted on flickr





London 2012 Aquatic Centre, UK








Wembley Stadium, London, UK




Sochi Olympic Stadium, Russia





Camp Nou, Barcelona, Spain




Valencia Stadium, Spain




Valencia Tennis Arena, Spain




PGE Arena, Gdansk, Poland



World Cup Stadia, Doha, Qatar




Last edited by the spliff fairy; January 14th, 2012 at 03:16 PM.
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 05:46 AM   #149
michał_
Registered User
 
michał_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Krk | Stw
Posts: 1,634
Likes (Received): 71

Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
I'm not knocking, but some of those Japanese stadiums look like altered versions of Texas Stadium, Cowboys Stadium, Reliant, U of Phoenix Stadium and Mall of America Field...
Now please, be serious. Texas Stadium here is hilarious. Its only resemblance to the Oita stadium is the steel frame which however serves a purpose in Oita that didn't exist for Texas Stadium. Not mentioning that you actually give stadiums that existed BEFORE the American ones as altered versions of grounds that were built later. So I reckon someone in Japan has a time machine to copy American stadiums when they didn't even exist?

For the record - I completely disagree with this thread's theory about the US and am pretty sad that mods actually allowed this instead of deleting it. But your post is just unreal...
michał_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 07:15 AM   #150
will101
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: silicon valley or Salem
Posts: 4,830
Likes (Received): 1569

So the gist of this thread is that it is preferable to build fantastic looking covers, but ignore the fact that the spectator seating for the event is terrible? Some of these places require binoculars to see the event. The US focuses on the micro-architecture of the optimal spectator experience, rather than wasting billions on pretty (but useless) architectural baubles. The UK and Germany are starting to understand the principle, but the rest of the world has a loooong way to go.
will101 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 08:13 AM   #151
royal rose1
Registered User
 
royal rose1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 997
Likes (Received): 257

Sorry, but is this a joke? Take a look around before making such a blatantly ignorant thread.

I'll list a few stadiums for you to check out-
-New Dallas Cowboys Stadium
-University of Phoenix (as many have mentioned)
-The Lucas Oil Stadium isn't exactly cliche either, it utilizes a warehouse design in dedication to the industry in Indianapolis.
-BoK center in Tulsa.
-Barclays in Queens
-While it is still somewhat conservative, look at Qwest in Seattle, my favorite stadium there is.

There are plenty of risky architecture stadiums out there. And the ones that aren't risky, usually aren't because they don't match the architecture of the city.
royal rose1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 09:13 AM   #152
rantanamo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 3,507
Likes (Received): 353

The lesson learned here is, the question should probably be asked of Europe. US stadiums don't take quite the radical chances on the exterior, but have taken lots of them on bowl designs, while China seems to be the king of exteriors.
rantanamo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 09:51 AM   #153
JJG
Registered User
 
JJG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 3,422
Likes (Received): 1048

Quote:
Originally Posted by michał_ View Post
Now please, be serious. Texas Stadium here is hilarious. Its only resemblance to the Oita stadium is the steel frame which however serves a purpose in Oita that didn't exist for Texas Stadium. Not mentioning that you actually give stadiums that existed BEFORE the American ones as altered versions of grounds that were built later. So I reckon someone in Japan has a time machine to copy American stadiums when they didn't even exist?

For the record - I completely disagree with this thread's theory about the US and am pretty sad that mods actually allowed this instead of deleting it. But your post is just unreal...
Didn't say they copied American stadiums. Just pointing out similarities. I said 'altered', not exact.

And going to what others are saying, the interior is THE most important thing in building a stadium, not the exterior.

If you wanna make a stadium look like a spaceship, go ahead. But at least have the inside look just as good.
JJG está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 11:49 AM   #154
nomarandlee
My Mind Has Left My Body
 
nomarandlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: 1060 W. Addison, City by the Lake
Posts: 7,209
Likes (Received): 2762

Quote:
Originally Posted by rantanamo View Post
Just look at the International Ballparks thread. Look at Super Saitama Stadium. Toyota Stadium's roof. Oita Eye, Sapporo Dome, Osaka Dome, Mazda Stadium. There's some truly different stuff. Not just different from the rest of the world, but also different from other Japanese stadiums. There's nothing like a lot of these stadiums. The bowls are smaller, but there are lots of flowing, less segmented designs than their world counterparts.
.
Meh, they look modern but I don't think they look very refined design wise. Especially the baseball stadiums looks rather drab and cold including even the outdoor parks.

China on the other hand is really pushing the limits design wise for its stadiums with some truly fantastic looking stadiums. What make it all the more impressive is they don't have any truly renown major professional leagues utilizing them. I give mixed grades at best for of most of the new office towers, cultural institutions, and new transit infrastructure in China but their stadiums and arenas do seem rather class.
__________________
Stephane Charbonnier, “I'd rather die standing up than live on my knees.”
nomarandlee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 02:58 PM   #155
michał_
Registered User
 
michał_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Krk | Stw
Posts: 1,634
Likes (Received): 71

Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Didn't say they copied American stadiums. Just pointing out similarities. I said 'altered', not exact.
Sorry then, I thoguht your point was to say they copied the American venues.
michał_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 07:08 PM   #156
MoreOrLess
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,240
Likes (Received): 228

I'd say the main reason for the rather conservative stadium design in the US(and indeed the UK) is that such designs arent really used to "sell" the nation or cities very often. The US doesnt tend to host international events all that often and when it does cities such as New York don't need an eye catching stadium design to sell them.
MoreOrLess no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2012, 08:23 PM   #157
KiwiRob
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,366
Likes (Received): 5

Wow seriously amazed at the vast number of impressive stadiums in China and those proposed or under construction, what do they use them all for? Does China have a massive fixation on tennis and athletics?
KiwiRob no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2012, 02:38 AM   #158
particlez
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 532
Likes (Received): 106

The US and the other wealthy countries still put a lot of money into their athletic facilities. The difference is, many American facilities are built in a decidedly retro aesthetic.

There are exceptions, namely stadiums like Cowboys stadium, Reliant stadium, U of Phoenix stadium, the new Marlins ballpark, etc. But Camden Yards in Baltimore was heralded as a godsend, and has set the stage for many other retro lookalikes. Brick facades, Asymmetrical dimensions, even exposed ironwork with forest green seating are part of the imagery.

We can also talk about stadiums as a waste of money; money that could be better spent on improved public transit and healthcare and education. But that's for another topic.
particlez no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2012, 03:50 AM   #159
Somnifor
Paradise Island
 
Somnifor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 3,199
Likes (Received): 3289

Target Field is built with classic materials so it doesn't look like a space ship but it still has modern lines and is a very well designed stadium in functional terms. One of the problems it has in terms of being represented on the internet is that it is built in a very tight space so it is hard to get good photographs that sum up its exterior in one shot because you have to photograph it from up close.

image hosted on flickr

mplsjuly201153b by afsmps, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

mplsnov2011128 by afsmps, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

mplsnov2011135 by afsmps, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

mplsnov2011136 by afsmps, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

mplsnov2011137 by afsmps, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Target Field by Brendan Meier, on Flickr

Last edited by Somnifor; January 18th, 2012 at 06:54 AM.
Somnifor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2012, 03:56 AM   #160
djrules5454
Registered User
 
djrules5454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: MN
Posts: 1,052
Likes (Received): 64

Quote:
Originally Posted by michał_ View Post
Now please, be serious. Texas Stadium here is hilarious. Its only resemblance to the Oita stadium is the steel frame which however serves a purpose in Oita that didn't exist for Texas Stadium. Not mentioning that you actually give stadiums that existed BEFORE the American ones as altered versions of grounds that were built later. So I reckon someone in Japan has a time machine to copy American stadiums when they didn't even exist?
Well, I can say with certainty that the Tokyo Dome is 6 years newer than Mall of America Field (the structure itself is actually known as the Metrodome, and was completed in 1982).

Tokyo Dome has considerably more decorative flair to it than the Metrodome, though, which was built as a budget stadium. Tokyo Dome certainly would win in a style points contest between the two bubble-roofed structures.
djrules5454 está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
american, european, roof, stadium

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu