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Old April 28th, 2009, 04:46 AM   #1
wheel of steel
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PHILIPPINES | High Speed Rail

Proposed Philippines First High Speed Railway Line
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Old April 28th, 2009, 04:47 AM   #2
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MVP Eyeing NAIA-DMIA Railway

BUSINESSMAN Manny Pangilinan has reportedly expressed interest to participate in the planned $3-billion high-speed rail project that will connect the Diosdado Macapagal International Airport in Clark (DMIA) to the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (Naia). This rail system is the key for the conversion of the Naia to a domestic airport and the DMIA as the country’s main international airport in five to 10 years.

Victor Jose Luciano, Clark International Airport Corp. (CIAC) president and CEO, said in his presentation at a forum on Friday in Holiday Inn Clark that he had a discussion with Pangilinan on the matter last week.

Luciano said Pangilinan can provide the right of way for the properties that the proposed high-speed rail will be passing through from Caloocan to Magallanes.

“With this right of way, we can now connect the Naia to Clark,” Luciano said.

Interviewed by reporters later, Luciano said currently, they have no problem with the right of way from Clark to the Caloocan part of the North Luzon Expressway. This is why getting the right of way from the Caloocan-to-Magallanes portion is critical for the project.

Luciano said the project will probably cost at least $3 billion, with $1 billion going to the right of way, and the $2 billion to be spent for the construction and the trains.

He said this will be a joint-venture project and they are targeting to choose the private-sector partner within the year.

CIAC, he said, will entertain an unsolicited offer and once they have finished the negotiations and agreed on the terms, they will make an announcement.

“Anybody can match it,” he said.

Luciano said the airlines want this high-speed rail—bringing passengers from Manila to Clark and vice versa in just 45 minutes—to be constructed first before they would transfer to DMIA.

If plans go smoothly, he said the rail system will be finished in five to 10 years.
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Old April 28th, 2009, 04:51 AM   #3
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Manila-Clark railway attracts MPIC’s interest
Vol. XXII, No. 187
Monday, April 27, 2009 | MANILA, PHILIPPINES
Today’s Headlines
Manila-Clark railway attracts MPIC’s interest

METRO PACIFIC Investments Corp. (MPIC) is considering bidding for a 120-kilometer high-speed rail project that will link the Metro Manila and Clark Freeport airports, a Clark International Airport Corp. (CIAC) official said on Friday.

The railway is being touted as a key component of plans to make Clark’s Diosdado Macapagal International Airport the country’s main hub given the Ninoy Aquino International Airport’s (NAIA) limited capacity for expansion.

"Right now, we can see that NAIA will become congested. Twenty-five million international and domestic passengers arrive in NAIA [annually]. That will keep on growing," CIAC President and CEO Victor Jose I. Luciano told an outsourcing forum.

In contrast, the Clark airport sits on land roughly four times as large as NAIA’s and its runways are the only ones in the Philippines that can accommodate the large Airbus A380, he said.

"We are looking at ... the Japan model where Narita is the international airport and Haneda in Tokyo is the domestic airport," Mr. Luciano said.

"The other day I was with [MPIC chairman] Manuel V. Pangilinan. He has the interconnecting right-of-way between Caloocan and Magallanes and that is the key," he said. "[MPIC] will have an advantage because it has the right-of-way."

Mr. Pangilinan, who also heads the country’s biggest telco, Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. (PLDT), was not available for comment but an official confirmed MPIC’s interest.

"Since [the firm] is in talks to connect the South Luzon Expressway to the North Luzon Expressway, it makes sense to look at the project," the official, who requested anonymity, said.

Trains are expected to run at over 200 kilometers per hour during the 34- to 45-minute journey.

Mediaquest Holdings Inc., a unit of the Beneficial Trust Fund of PLDT, has a minority interest in.
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Old April 28th, 2009, 05:12 AM   #4
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Good news. I hope this proposed project will materialize.
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Old April 28th, 2009, 12:35 PM   #5
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>"We are looking at ... the Japan model where Narita is the
> international airport and Haneda in Tokyo is the domestic
> airport," Mr. Luciano said.

Damn, ouch, no No NOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!
Don't repeat our mistake there! :-S

ok, things may be better if there is a good link between those two airports. But one thing still stands - Narita is a hellhole. The very fact it is very far, poorly connected and stuck in conflict with "Nariban" tell all.
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Old April 29th, 2009, 04:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2co2co View Post
>"We are looking at ... the Japan model where Narita is the
> international airport and Haneda in Tokyo is the domestic
> airport," Mr. Luciano said.

Damn, ouch, no No NOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!
Don't repeat our mistake there! :-S

ok, things may be better if there is a good link between those two airports. But one thing still stands - Narita is a hellhole. The very fact it is very far, poorly connected and stuck in conflict with "Nariban" tell all.
I guess the government cannot afford to build anothera huge international airport near Manila as big as Clark which is 120km from the Capital. This is the option we've got.

Anyway, if there is a big chance of having this materialize, Ill give a 80% mark .
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Old May 1st, 2009, 04:51 AM   #7
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Business MVP

Without doubt, Manuel V. Pangilinan is well on his way to becoming the country’s business MVP. His wealthy and influential business group is already a valuable player in various industries, including telecommunications, real-estate development, and hospital and tollways management, and remains on the lookout for opportunities to further diversify and broaden its reach.

Obviously, there is logic in his group’s business choices. Seemingly, Pangilinan, or MVP, appears concentrated on the transport or carrier business. As things are, he already provides various platforms and systems—through his telecommunications and tollway companies—for goods, services, information, transportation and people to move or flow from one point to the other.

And one cannot say his business choice is ill-conceived. Since his return to the Philippines after many years as a highly paid executive in Hong Kong, he seems to have had the uncanny ability to invest in the right industry at the right time. He has had vision and foresight for economic opportunity—perhaps the very traits that should be required of the next Philippine president.

His business group bought into the Philippine Long Distance and Telephone Co. (PLDT) just as the telecommunications industry was being liberalized during the Ramos administration, and his management team has since then raised not just PLDT but also other telecommunications firms, like Smart and Piltel, to unprecedented reach and profitability.

He also successfully invested in the conversion of the former Fort Bonifacio military base in Taguig into the Bonifacio Global City business district, which is now among the booming top-of-mind real-estate developments in Metro Manila.

His Metro Pacific Investments Corp. has also purchased a controlling stake in Manila North Tollways Corp. from the Lopez group. This latest acquisition invariably makes his group the undisputed biggest toll-roads operator in the country, with participation in the North Luzon Expressway, as well as its planned extension to La Union from Tarlac; the Subic-Tipo Expressway; the proposed link of C-5 to the Manila Port Area that will cross the Nlex near the Valenzuela interchange; and the Subic-Clark-Tarlac Expressway.

More recent business decisions allowed him to also take advantage of emerging opportunities in healthcare and medical tourism, petroleum, mining, and transportation and logistics. From cradle to the grave, many Filipinos use products and services provided by Pangilinan’s business group. Talk about being all over the place, and becoming indispensable to everyday lives.

Only recently, he has reportedly expressed interest in bidding for the planned $3-billion high-speed rail project that will connect the Diosdado Macapagal International Airport in Clark to the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (Naia) in Parañaque City. This was revealed to the media by Victor Jose Luciano, Clark International Airport Corp. president and CEO.

Luciano also says Pangilinan’s advantage is his ability to provide the right of way for the proposed high-speed rail from Caloocan City to Magallanes in Makati City. With this right of way, he says, Naia can finally be connected to Clark. As for the right of way from Caloocan City to Clark, the matter is nearly settled, he adds.

The Clark chief also says the project will probably cost at least $3 billion, with $1 billion going to right-of-way acquisition, and $2 billion to be spent for the construction and the trains. He adds that the government expects to choose a private-sector partner for the joint-venture project before the end of the year by entertaining even unsolicited offer.

In building the high-speed rail, which can bring Metro Manila passengers to and from Clark in about 45 minutes, he says it will be easier to convince airline companies to move to Clark and make it the country’s premier international airport. Naia, meanwhile, can be converted into a domestic airport.

One can only hope that Pangilinan seriously considers building the proposed railway from Naia to Clark. Its benefits to the economy can be tremendous. It will also complement plans for the so-called Northrail, including the proposed rehabilitation of the old rail line from Manila to Damortis in La Union, which has been in discussion since the mid-1990s.


Given the Pangilinan group’s recent business decisions relatively to transport, and its current control of toll roads north of Metro Manila, building a railway seems to be a strategic fit. And a public-private partnership on a major infrastructure project such as this is a good way to pump-prime a struggling economy.
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Old July 8th, 2009, 07:55 AM   #8
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Any updates on the project? When do they intend to finish? This is exciting. Most developed (and developing) countries locate their Main airports outside the Metro and connect them via High-speed trains.

I've tried the 500km/hr train in China (forgot the name) and it took me less than 10 minutes to get to the airport. The sad part though was that the train station (going to the Airport) was in the middle of nowhere!
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Old July 30th, 2009, 01:28 PM   #9
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Already in 2010?

On Wikipedia, in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diosdad...tional_Airport
it is written

North Luzon Railway

Construction has begun on a new US$421 million North Luzon project (initiated by the Philippine National Railways), scheduled for completion by 2010. Two separate lines will be constructed, one for the Airport Railway, and another for the NorthRail commuter and high speed rail line serving Metro Manila and the northern Luzon provinces.

Is that correct?
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Old July 31st, 2009, 12:49 AM   #10
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i don't think so... the first phase of the Northrail is the one going to be completed in 2010; they are two different projects AFAIK...
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Old October 1st, 2009, 12:34 PM   #11
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How fast is this high-speed railway about which they are talking? Metro Manila to Clark in 45 minutes is quite good, but can we these trains going faster in a few years, given today's railway technologies?

Pangarap ko lang afford natin ngayon ang mag-lev para dito
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Old October 1st, 2009, 04:54 PM   #12
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High speed railways are possible if the government will serious it they will assure all the documents needed here and the source of found and the contractors who will built it.
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Old October 1st, 2009, 05:29 PM   #13
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If this High speed railway become a reality to us it's seem the rolling stock is look like this one.


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Old October 4th, 2009, 09:59 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imanaddict View Post

I've tried the 500km/hr train in China (forgot the name) and it took me less than 10 minutes to get to the airport. The sad part though was that the train station (going to the Airport) was in the middle of nowhere!
That is Maglev Airport Link from Citycenter in Shanghai, China to Shanghai Pudong International Airport.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maglev_%28transport%29
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Old October 4th, 2009, 10:10 AM   #15
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I think The Islands nation of Philippines with a few of populations. I think it is hard to support a High Speed railway to profit.

Approx. 350Km Taiwan High Speed Rail,serviced over 10 million people, recorded with hugh loss so far.

On the other way, High-speed jet boat service and air services is morely likely to support Philippines.
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Old October 4th, 2009, 09:04 PM   #16
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OK, but they're using the term "high speed" a bit frivolously. At least according to a European definition it means top speeds above 250 km/h and average speeds no less than 200 km/h. A travel time from Manila to the airport in 45 minutes implies an average speed of 160 km/h, which is what the diesel-powered intercity trains in Denmark can manage - on track laid in the days of Queen Victoria.
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Old October 5th, 2009, 07:25 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
OK, but they're using the term "high speed" a bit frivolously. At least according to a European definition it means top speeds above 250 km/h and average speeds no less than 200 km/h. A travel time from Manila to the airport in 45 minutes implies an average speed of 160 km/h, which is what the diesel-powered intercity trains in Denmark can manage - on track laid in the days of Queen Victoria.
we don't follow your European Definition... and besides Acela (Washington-New York) only has an average speed of 130km/h and yet they're calling it high speed...
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Old October 5th, 2009, 11:21 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pi_malejana View Post
we don't follow your European Definition... and besides Acela (Washington-New York) only has an average speed of 130km/h and yet they're calling it high speed...
No one is forced to use other people's definitions, that's clear enough. However, now that you mention Acela (isn't it a tad faster than 130 km/h between DC and NY, BTW? I thoung it was NY-Boston that's the slow part...) it IS a bit of a bad joke among train lovers in Europe. When someone speaks of track upgradings to, say, 160 km/h (I'm not mocking you here: 160 is a "magic number". The highest track speed you can obtain without having to change all your signalling equipment) then some funny guy is bound to exclaim "Wow! That's right up there with Amtrak!!!"

Is there such as thing as an Asian definition of high-speed? There's no particular reason to have one, I suppose, lest the Asian Development Bank begins setting aside money specifically for fast trains. I had the impression, though, that the Asian countries already in this game (Japan, Korea, Taiwan) have already embraced design speeds of 300 km/h?
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Old October 5th, 2009, 04:03 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
OK, but they're using the term "high speed" a bit frivolously. At least according to a European definition it means top speeds above 250 km/h and average speeds no less than 200 km/h. A travel time from Manila to the airport in 45 minutes implies an average speed of 160 km/h, which is what the diesel-powered intercity trains in Denmark can manage - on track laid in the days of Queen Victoria.
I think in the Philippines anything over 50km/h would be considered "high speed"(at least for intercity trains-metro is better in this respect)- quoting wikipedia:

Quote:
...PNR trains can only run up to 50 km/h (31 miles per hour).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philipp...ional_Railways
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Old October 6th, 2009, 10:27 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
No one is forced to use other people's definitions, that's clear enough. However, now that you mention Acela (isn't it a tad faster than 130 km/h between DC and NY, BTW? I thoung it was NY-Boston that's the slow part...) it IS a bit of a bad joke among train lovers in Europe. When someone speaks of track upgradings to, say, 160 km/h (I'm not mocking you here: 160 is a "magic number". The highest track speed you can obtain without having to change all your signalling equipment) then some funny guy is bound to exclaim "Wow! That's right up there with Amtrak!!!"

Is there such as thing as an Asian definition of high-speed? There's no particular reason to have one, I suppose, lest the Asian Development Bank begins setting aside money specifically for fast trains. I had the impression, though, that the Asian countries already in this game (Japan, Korea, Taiwan) have already embraced design speeds of 300 km/h?
i believe they average right around that speed... they do reach 240+km/h somewhere i'm not sure...

yes but their economy is nowhere near RP and besides hsl (300+) won't really make profit... the trains are there only to compete with bus lines not with planes i think..


Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
I think in the Philippines anything over 50km/h would be considered "high speed"(at least for intercity trains-metro is better in this respect)- quoting wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philipp...ional_Railways
yeah you can say that...

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