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View Poll Results: Should there be a universal driving system?
DEFINITELY!!! (ON THE LEFT) 7 16.28%
DEFINITELY!!! (ON THE RIGHT) 28 65.12%
NO WAY!!! 8 18.60%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

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Old May 3rd, 2009, 01:49 AM   #61
Need4Weed
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In Serbia we had this as a part of our elementary school curriculum, plus every semester we had a visit from the local traffic police department. Usually they were showing us some educational movies about general traffic safety rules, things like crossing the street safely, obeying the rules, reporting a drunken driver, etc. I remember we had a textbook on traffic rules, whose title was "A Driver and a Pedestrian in Traffic" (Pešak i Vozač u Saobraćaju), but I don't remember whether it was a separate subject. It was a long time ago.
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Old May 3rd, 2009, 07:58 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdw35 View Post
Just wondering, how many of your guys took road safety and driving lessons as part of normal curriculum in grades 5 - 8. I had those in these so called "dirigentie" classes. I will try to explain what that is.
At least here in Romania, in grades 5 - 12 one of the teachers is a so called "diriginte" (form master). He/she also plays some kind of counseling role and is closer to the students in that class (i.e. group of 20-30 students) than the other teachers. Anyways, he or she also holds (besides his normal class - e.g. my form master in grades 5-8 was the geography teacher) one class per week where, besides discussing ongoing class problems, various topics are presented, e.g.:
- civic education (even though we distinctly had one course in the 8th grade about this);
- how to be polite and curteous and stuff;
- career development;
- how to keep the house clean;
- hygiene / sexual education;
- environmental care etc. etc. and
- driving-related stuff.

...Oh man, I remember in the 6th grade a discussion that went like:
Form master: "Awareness while driving is critical. For instance, during my numerous driving years it only once happened to me to be overtaken without noticing."
Me: "Yes, when you were asleep at the wheel."
Form master: "Would you please leave the classroom now."

[Note: In the old days, here in Romania, when a grade school / high school student did something shameful, i.e. make an insulting comment to the teacher, or was too noisy, the teacher told him or her to "leave the classroom". The student was then supposed to wait outside on the corridor until the end of the class and supposedly meditate at his or her behavior. This all changed in '96 - '97, when I think one student that got kicked out of the classroom actually left the school premise for the rest of the class, and was hit by a car. The parents sued the school - since the child was in the school's responsibility - and I they won
Same in Portugal, just that we are still sent outside the classroom, get marked absent, but we can go wherever we want inside the school, or if permtted or last class, leave school.

Here you have to pass the theory test before getting behind thw wheel and I belive lessons are obligatory. All together costs €500!
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Old May 3rd, 2009, 09:19 PM   #63
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In Romania you have to attend theory classes, I don't really know if there's a specific number of hours. Then, you have to pass a written theory exam, similar to the one at the Police, so that you can drive on the street with an instructor to your right (well, that's only in theory, because most students pass their so-called "driving school" theory exams after finishing the needed 30 hours of driving practice). Next thing you do is waiting for hours in queues to get settled for the theory exam at the police (that's the most irritating thing I have ever experienced). The theory exam in Romania is pretty hard, I was lucky for only failing it once. I have friends that had that exam for 6 or even 7 times. There are 26 questions (subjects varying from mecanics to driving safety, from traffic signs to first aid in case of accident) from which you have to give 22 correct answers. The exam used to be written, now they use computers. After passing the theory exam there's the traffic exam, which is pretty simple. Even if you fail the first time, I don't know anyone not to pass it the second time.

Because of the difficulty of the theory exam, many people used to use bribery to get their driving licenses. There was a big scandal here in Romania when they caught the ones involved, from who many policemen.

I learned on an Opel Meriva, a rather small and funny car, but a good car nevertheless.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wdw35 View Post
[Note: In the old days, here in Romania, when a grade school / high school student did something shameful, i.e. make an insulting comment to the teacher, or was too noisy, the teacher told him or her to "leave the classroom". The student was then supposed to wait outside on the corridor until the end of the class and supposedly meditate at his or her behavior. This all changed in '96 - '97, when I think one student that got kicked out of the classroom actually left the school premise for the rest of the class, and was hit by a car. The parents sued the school - since the child was in the school's responsibility - and I they won.]
Well, even if it's against the law, many romanian teachers still kick students out of class.

Last edited by alex_zebe; May 3rd, 2009 at 09:24 PM.
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Old May 4th, 2009, 06:40 PM   #64
Jeroen669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
Here you have to pass the theory test before getting behind thw wheel and I belive lessons are obligatory. All together costs €500!
Here you also have to pass theory test, but you're allowed to take lessons without it. (untill your exams of course) Theory lessons are not obligatory here, at least not 2 years ago. In fact, I just bought some 2nd books books for €25, test itself costed about €35, and that was it. Made only one mistake.
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Old May 4th, 2009, 06:43 PM   #65
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It was funnier when I had to tell my driving instructor what the green line in the center of a road means in NL. (Vmax=100). She didn't know that back then (2005).
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Old May 6th, 2009, 01:38 AM   #66
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In Poland you have to attend some theory classes and drive minimum 30 hours in a driving school. Then you have to pass the theory test and the practical exam in the city (which includes driving and parking). The course costs about 1000 zł (~240€), the exam itself something around 170 zł (40€) - I don't remember exact figure and the rules and prices were changed recently. Theoretically you can attend the exam as many times as you want, although after every 3rd failure you must take another 5 hours at the driving school.

Currently we have some problem with the waiting times, the queue for the practical exam can be 1-2 months long. Moreover many people don't pass the exam at the first time.

Various examination centres use different cars, although they are always B-class. I believe that Toyota Yarises, Opel Corsas and Fiat Grande Puntos are most common. Driving schools usually uses the same cars as local examination centre. I've learned on a Toyota Yaris and apart from sleazy 1 liter engine it was very pleasant car to drive.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 10:51 AM   #67
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Here in Croatia, when i was getting my license, you had around 10h of theory + 4h of first aid, you had to pass it before you could do practical part. Practical part consisted of 30h of driving for B category or you could do 10h for A and 20h for B to get both A and B license (motors and cars). You can go to school with 17, but you can get license only after you are 18. When i was getting it i immediately got full fledged license, but last few years, they introduced "beginners license", so you cant drive alone while dark, no alcohol and stuff like that (you can have 0.0005% alcohol if you are "adult driver" here).

As for being able to drive after you pass it... Well i guess it all depends on quality of instructor and your confidence. I guess the most important part is just to drive and get as much experience you can, not to be afraid, but be aware of your abilities! I have friend that passed exam on 1st try, no problems, but he never (i think) sit behind driving wheel after that... I am pretty sure he should get at least another 30h of practical lesions before he tries to drive now.

And ofcourse, to be good driver i think you do need both city driving and motorway experience, but i do think if person lives in small town like me and just drives around, he can drive 100 000 km and not be able to drive in crowded city with multiple lanes. I have few friends that never drive to big city because they are either afraid or they just know they dont know to drive well which i also respect because it is better for some drivers to know their limits.


Sooo, if you dont mind, i see lots of good drivers around, one question.
you have sign like this:

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y26/ToTaL13/e036.gif
You want to go straight, do you use turn signal? which one?
You want to go right, do you use turn signal?


Or you have sign like this:

http://www.signalsistem.hr/images/do...ploce/e035.gif
You want to go straight, do you use turn signal? which one?
You want to go right, do you use turn signal?

Thing is, i had lots of arguments with my friends and i am pretty sure in what my teacher taught me and i asked few more but some people keep using turn signal and going straight?!?

PS: just to rule out weird intersections, the roads are at right angles (90 deg).

Last edited by Total; May 6th, 2009 at 03:29 PM. Reason: Signs gone?
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Old May 6th, 2009, 02:10 PM   #68
RawLee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Total View Post

You want to go straight, do you use turn signal? which one?
You want to go right, do you use turn signal?
In this case,if you go left or straight you have to blink left,and right if you go right.

Quote:
Or you have sign like this:

You want to go straight, do you use turn signal? which one?
You want to go right, do you use turn signal?
In this case,if you follow the main road to the right you dont have to signal it,but if you go either straight or left,you have to indicate it.


Signalling doesnt depend on geographical location,but on geographical location relative to the road's priority. Meaning,if you in your mind straighten the main road on the sign,in which direction do you have to blink in order to indicate your intentions.

But many drivers cant sort this out,so I can unerstand why many dont indicate going straight in the first case,especially because if you dont indicate your direction,the default will be you want to go straight,which in that case,dont exist.


BTW,I hate the first case,as I not only have to yield to the vehicles going on the main road,but also to the vehicles on my right. If its a frequented place,its almost impossible to turn left there,and going straight also borders impossible.

Last edited by RawLee; May 6th, 2009 at 02:16 PM.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 03:01 PM   #69
keber
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I don't see signs, but I presume, how they look.

So, if you turn left or right, good drivers always use blinkers, no matter if it is priority or non-priority road. Going straight you are not allowed to use any blinker in any case.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 03:36 PM   #70
RawLee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keber View Post
Going straight you are not allowed to use any blinker in any case.
I disagree. Changing direction is relative to priority. If the road turns,although your car changes direction,your position relative to the road doesnt change.

Same with entering a higher priority road,you have to indicate you enter it,even if its straight ahead.

BTW,the 2 images:

first:




second:

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Old May 6th, 2009, 04:41 PM   #71
keber
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RawLee View Post
I disagree.
Looks like, traffic rules for blinkers are not equal through EU. For me (and I as remember from driving school) you signal turning only, no matter of a road priority. And if you turn following priority you don't even need to signal this turn, but it is still recommended to do (that could have been changed in years after I've made my license, but I'm not sure).

Anyhow, people don't use blinkers at the right moment, or they don't use them at all. Those two cases are therefore marginal.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 05:20 PM   #72
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You use blinkers for changing location,for example,lanes on a multi-lane road. In a junction(2x1, multi-lane junctions obviously have turning lanes,in which blinkers are kind of less important),if you paint the lines,you would see that you change lines,if there are no special circumstances. But in these cases if you enter or leave the main road,you change lanes.


I use blinkers all the time,they can save my life. I dont know why people dont get why they are built into vehicles...
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Old May 6th, 2009, 06:00 PM   #73
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Talking about blinkers: when I see an american car driving here (which is rare) I notice most of them don't have orange blinkers, but just a blinking (red) backlight. What would be the reason behind that?
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Old May 6th, 2009, 06:06 PM   #74
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Because they have orange parking lights ?
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Old May 11th, 2009, 04:56 PM   #75
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How to cope with driving incivility ?

As I was recently studying the terrible traffic problems of Cairo, I eventually found this article: http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2006/779/feature.htm

Quote:
Although it is difficult to discern any particular rules of the road, many streets are one-way. Not always is this rule adhered to. Red lights do not necessarily mean "stop", or even "slow down", and it is the worst of mistakes to believe that a green "walk" light means it is safe to cross the road. Cars flood through red traffic lights with horns blaring to warn anyone who might consider getting in their way. The overriding rule is to make use of every available space: lane markers are simply ignored. When you drive in Cairo the only time you ever stop is when there is absolutely no way to squeeze around whoever is driving in front of you. Sometimes pavements are not even sacred.
Despite schemes of modernisation in many parts of Cairo, donkey-carts are still a prominent feature in many streets. It is also common that the carts manage their way through traffic with a system of their own, ignoring any and all road signs. Surprisingly to some, many cars do the same; they use the lanes of oncoming traffic when their own lanes are full.
Quote:
"Lane markers on the roads are merely suggestions, and traffic signals are only an opinion," says Abdel-Hamid. Most people drive like madmen: it is quite common for a driver to simply start driving down the middle between two lanes of traffic, honking his horn expecting the cars parallel to his on each side to make room if possible. "This is not considered rude or in any way out of place"
Assuming this is true (which it seems to be, judging by the desperately clogged-up traffic flow), I was wondering how this kind of situation can be coped with, and in broader terms, how can planners deal with driving incivilities of this magnitude. I mean, when nobody drives by the rules.
Any idea ?
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Old May 11th, 2009, 09:06 PM   #76
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Ha ! I can spot Polonez
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Old May 11th, 2009, 09:40 PM   #77
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Enforcement, enforcement, encforcement. When you hit people's purse, they eventually start to obey the rules. But then, you need to have uncorrupt law enforcement which could be a big problem, especially in places like Cairo.

Quote:
Ha ! I can spot Polonez
And I spotted a Fiat 125
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Old May 11th, 2009, 09:46 PM   #78
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It's the people that must change. They must know that what they're doing is wrong. Fines won't solve all problems.
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Old May 11th, 2009, 11:09 PM   #79
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Listen to Poles, their driving culture is on a high level.
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Old May 11th, 2009, 11:13 PM   #80
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And the Dutch can teach you how to use a bicycle on busy roads, and how to follow all traffic regulations properly
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