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Old February 16th, 2014, 09:50 PM   #1341
jgacis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrapernab2 View Post
I've never seen such an event for a slab pour! Marching band, parade of trucks and workers, cheering audience....
Quote:
Originally Posted by tim1807 View Post
Indeed, next time there will be cheerleaders too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marco Polo View Post
This is so weirdly American, I must say...

Ah, well...
The most important thing is that conctrete is being poured.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KøbenhavnK View Post
Well the Americans do love parades.....

I think this sets new standards. There should be at least one marching brass band present for future supertall concrete pourings
Actually, there were cheerleaders (what we call here marching band drill-team members) from USC that I saw prepping for the event at the nearby Metropolis site. I just didn't have the audacity to take pictures of them .

I understand that this is a skyscraper construction forum, but as with any urban development, the city constantly runs on parallel dimensions from a political, economic, and social perspective.

The fanfare you see reflects many things that have been going on not only with this project, but Los Angeles as a whole. The concrete pour was a major part of this event, but many underlying aspects where in effect...


As some already mentioned or you may not be aware of...

1. USC (University of Southern California) has a very strong alumni network. Their main campus is only a little over 3 miles from this site. Korean Airlines is developing/financing this project and the CEO (Cho Yang-Ho) is a USC graduate who earned an MBA here back in 1979. He is now running a global corporation that is investing money back into L.A.'s economy. It's not surprising that the USC Marching Band is paying homage to an alumni member. It's even less surprising when this key alumni member has the full support of the Los Angeles Mayor, who was present to thank Korean Airlines for injecting this 1 Billion USD project into the local economy.

2. This will be the largest continuous concrete pour known (over 2000 truckloads and about 20 hours). It's not an ordinary thing when the adjudicator of the Guinness Book of World Records talks with the developer's engineering team and is present to witness this event

3. It took over a year to demolish the previous building and get to where we are at today. This foundation pour will mark the milestone where construction crews can now begin building up to what will be L.A's tallest skyscraper (aside from the antenna/spire controversy here) and tallest west of the Mississippi River.

While the event wasn't fully jammed pack, I saw many local folks and outside visitors attending the event. Some worked across the street with the LA Metro Transit and a couple (who ran their own business) I talked with lived down the street at the EVO apartments. One guy drove all the way from Fullerton and another gentleman in the electrical industry was on a trip scouting for business in downtown. Downtown L.A. is a dynamic place, just like any other global city. But our city is going through our own changes and renaissance. That's what makes L.A, well, ...L.A.
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Last edited by jgacis; February 16th, 2014 at 10:01 PM.
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Old February 16th, 2014, 10:22 PM   #1342
KøbenhavnK
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No need to defend yourself. I enjoyed your pictures. Who's against community involvment and a good show???
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Old February 16th, 2014, 10:25 PM   #1343
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From theguardian.com

SUNDAY, 16 FEBRUARY 2014


Quote:
World's largest concrete pour: LA witnesses 'ballet of construction trucks'
Wilshire Grand building will put Los Angeles back in the skyscraper business as city aims to rejuvenate its centre



Nate Berg in Los Angeles

Hundreds of spectators lined the streets in downtown Los Angeles Saturday for what might seem a lacklustre event in a city known for its entertainment: a parade of trucks poured a load of concrete into a hole. But this was no ordinary hole. It's the site of the future Wilshire Grand, a 73-storey building filled with offices, retail and hotel rooms that will, when it opens in 2017, be the tallest building in the city, and the eighth tallest in the US.

It's a building of such significance in the city that even the pouring of its foundation is a moment to celebrate. The project – a $1.1bn (£660m) investment – will be the first major skyscraper built in the city in more than 20 years. That's a time span that's seen the global footprint of cities expand dramatically. Hyperspeed development in places like China and the Middle East have turned practically empty land into instant city skylines boasting the tallest buildings in the world. Long an American pastime, building skyscrapers has become a global game – and LA has largely been out of it.

So it is being welcomed with great pomp that LA is once again building tall. Walking down the middle of a closed road Saturday, the building's developer was joined by its architect and the city's mayor in leading a parade of dignitaries around the project's site. Accompanied by the University of Southern California's marching band and a pair of white and blue concrete trucks, the parade moved its way around the site as spectators and policemen took photos with their phones. The parade was the spectacle, but the real show was the pouring of the building's foundation, a banal yet in this case highly publicised procedure that will help ensure the 1,100ft tower can withstand the seismic and wind forces that will regularly test its structural integrity.

For reasons not purely promotional, the foundation's concrete was dumped into the hole in one continuous pour – 21,200 cubic yards (16,200 cubic metres) of concrete dumped by 2,120 trucks over a 26-hour period, enough to earn the event a Guinness World Record. The continuous pour turned out to be the most economical way to fill the hole, according to Chris Martin, lead architect of the Wilshire Grand project, from LA-based firm AC Martin.

But pouring this much concrete at once is no small task. From sourcing the concrete and materials, to closing the streets, to keeping the concrete cool enough to set, the procedure is indicative of the technical evolution of building massive buildings. "You've never seen anything like this," says Martin. "I never have."

The entire site covers three acres, but the tower's foundation takes up about a football field's worth of space. It was a 17ft 6in hole ringed by 50,000lb (22,700kg) steel starter columns, providing a sturdy base for the structural columns that will rise to the building's highest floors.

After a series of speeches, a long line of trucks began pulling around the site, where the long, green arms of concrete pumping machines reached down from the street surface into the hole. At about a dozen stations, each truck took about 10 minutes to dump its 6,000lb load of concrete into the pumping machines before shuffling out and making way for another. Altogether they poured the equivalent of six and a half Olympic-size swimming pools full of concrete. It was a day-long relay that Martin called "a ballet of concrete trucks".

For about the next two weeks, more than 19 miles of plastic tubing will carry refrigerants through the mass, accelerating the cooling of the concrete's exothermic reactions enough for it to solidify. By then, the 17ft 6in thick foundation alone will weigh more than 90m lbs, the equivalent of four Eiffel Towers. Hyperbole and marching band theatrics aside, this project is more than just a fancy way to fill up a big hole. The foundation and its forthcoming tower are seen as an almost existentially important project for downtown Los Angeles, and the city as a whole.

"I think it has a potential to put LA on the map with respect to the world of tall buildings," says Daniel Safarik, of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, a group that tracks the development of skyscrapers. "Previously, LA was best known for blowing up tall buildings in movies, so you only had a few seconds to appreciate whatever architectural merits the US Bank Tower or the SunTrust Building had before it was destroyed by aliens or Bruce Willis." Historically, downtown LA was a capital for banks and oil companies. But in the early 1990s, banks began to merge together, consolidate offices or ditch the city for another state or country. "It created this huge vacuum in class A office space," says Martin.

The pressures and realities of the global market were manifest in empty office towers throughout downtown LA. It's been a slow rebound, and many in the city are hopeful that the Wilshire Grand is part of a new wave of investment downtown that will help the city compete internationally.

Not that LA has been sitting stagnant. Thanks to an adaptive reuse ordinance that has allowed the conversion of old and underused office buildings into housing since 1999, the downtown area has seen a return to prominence in this multicentric city. A population of more than 50,000 people is turning the central business district into a round-the-clock neighbourhood. But downtown LA requires more than the loft spaces and coffee shops of a gentrifying residential neighbourhood.

"Cities are globally competing with each other," Safarik says. "Regardless of their use, skyscrapers are seen as communicating the economic prominence of a city, and depending how big the country is, even the whole country. They're seen as a symbol of that place on the global stage. That's why it's gotten increasingly important for cities to build them."

The US was the birthplace of the skyscraper. Built in 1884, the 10-storey Home Insurance Building in Chicago is widely recognised as the world's first, owing to the innovative use of structural steel to frame the building. Despite a rich history of American skyscrapers – from New York's art deco-topped Chrysler Building to the former tallest building in the country, Chicago's Willis Tower, to the now-tallest 1,776ft One World Trade Centre, which recently topped out in lower Manhattan – the US has been overshadowed in recent decades by other countries, especially in Asia.

Large economic and political differences mean that American cities are highly unlikely to go on a building binge of Chinese proportions, but they're also unlikely to stop building altogether. The Wilshire Grand is one example; downtown Manhattan offers many others. Even the long-sidelined, 150-storey Chicago Spire project has shown signs of waking from its slumber in the midwest.

For Los Angeles, the Wilshire Grand is proof that the city still has the cachet to go big. Yet it is also true that the developer investing the $1.1bn to build this tower is not from LA, nor even the US. The company behind the project is the South Korean shipping and airline giant, the Hanjin Group. But this is not a slur on LA; rather, it is proof the city is still able to compete in the increasingly competitive global market, according to Qingyun Ma, an architect and dean of the USC School of Architecture, who has worked on some of the tallest buildings now standing in many Asian cities.

"LA has always been a platform for global interest and for global ambition," Ma says. "My personal take is that this tower will cause a lot more ambition globally to come to LA, not only to downtown but to many places to build taller buildings." He is hopeful that a denser, more urbanistic city will result – but knows it will take time.

Martin, too, suggests the city will have to be patient. Its skyline won't grow like Shanghai's or Dubai's, but it will continue to grow. "I remember in '92 when we said we're not going to build any tall buildings for a long time," he says. "At the time I was thinking 20 years – and we're kind of on track for that."

Nate Berg is a Los Angeles-based journalist who covers cities, design and technology. He tweets from @nate_berg
http://www.theguardian.com/cities/20...ks-los-angeles

Quote:
"Previously, LA was best known for blowing up tall buildings in movies, so you only had a few seconds to appreciate whatever architectural merits the US Bank Tower or the SunTrust Building had before it was destroyed by aliens or Bruce Willis."
LOL...
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Old February 16th, 2014, 10:27 PM   #1344
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KøbenhavnK View Post
No need to defend yourself. I enjoyed your pictures. Who's against community involvment and a good show???
Agree...

Thank you for enjoying the pics...
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Old February 16th, 2014, 10:55 PM   #1345
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I cannot wait to see this new building!
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Old February 17th, 2014, 05:33 AM   #1346
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http://www.neontommy.com/news/2014/0...-concrete-pour


reddit


http://ktla.com/2014/02/16/new-wilsh...ecord-pouring/


http://www.myfoxla.com/story/2473962...ur-sets-record


http://www.scpr.org/news/2014/02/16/...s-complete-la/


http://www.neontommy.com/news/2014/0...-concrete-pour

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reddit
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Old February 17th, 2014, 05:45 AM   #1347
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That's awesome to see this baby rising.
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Old February 17th, 2014, 06:16 AM   #1348
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If this ends up looking like the renderings, this will be one of the most gorgeous skyscrapers in America. The style is sleek, modern, and elegant. It soars!!
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Old February 17th, 2014, 08:09 AM   #1349
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Cool stuff. It even made the news here in Holland.
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Old February 17th, 2014, 09:13 AM   #1350
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And the rise of this building officially begins!!
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Old February 17th, 2014, 04:13 PM   #1351
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I watched coverage of this event this morning on BBC International here in Spain -- quite the event and anything that elevates the profile of architecture and construction is great by me!
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Old February 17th, 2014, 08:33 PM   #1352
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Old February 18th, 2014, 04:40 AM   #1353
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Wilshire Grand Tower

Pics taken by me on 17 Feb 2014...

[IMG]http://i61.************/330zj3l.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i62.************/2zhdzc7.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i59.************/5vvps5.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i61.************/5tz1bp.jpg[/IMG]
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Old February 20th, 2014, 05:26 AM   #1354
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Old February 20th, 2014, 09:36 PM   #1355
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Astounding timelapse! The coming and going of the cement trucks is really impressive
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Old February 21st, 2014, 02:07 AM   #1356
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Originally Posted by PinkFloyd View Post
Wow, amazing ballet of trucks coming and going, backing up two by two at each station to dump the cement...nonstop! "LA is my lady"
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Old February 21st, 2014, 02:17 AM   #1357
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DEDOTMOPO3 View Post
I agree that it's lame. They should have planned a taller building than US Bank.
Earthquakes. Frequent and very strong earthquakes. 300m is the max with the best in design, engineering and construction techniques to build something that will withstand a potential 7.0 to 9.0 on the Richter scale.

Japan has two towers a bit over 300m, and all buildings with occupants are 210-250m or so at maximum height. The sole exception is Landmark tower - it's a 296m bunker, overbuilt to withstand earthquakes.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 10:01 PM   #1358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by China Hand View Post
Earthquakes. Frequent and very strong earthquakes. 300m is the max with the best in design, engineering and construction techniques to build something that will withstand a potential 7.0 to 9.0 on the Richter scale.

Japan has two towers a bit over 300m, and all buildings with occupants are 210-250m or so at maximum height. The sole exception is Landmark tower - it's a 296m bunker, overbuilt to withstand earthquakes.
What about the Tokyo Sky Tree? That is over 600m.
I think they could build a building taller than the bank tower if they wanted to.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 03:47 AM   #1359
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Taipei 101 (509m) is the tallest occupied building (not communication tower) in an active earthquake zone, and it survived and 7.7 magnitude one while under construction, although I would hate to have been in the construction crane that fell

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZlFTPKhUts



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Old February 22nd, 2014, 04:11 AM   #1360
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Much more expensive to build here because of earthquake codes.
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