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Old April 26th, 2014, 07:31 PM   #1441
speedy1979
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The maximum earthquake is a 6.2??? Is that a typo?
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Old April 26th, 2014, 07:44 PM   #1442
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Northridge was a lot stronger, but that is further away.
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Old April 27th, 2014, 07:04 AM   #1443
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I think that was a typo....
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Old April 27th, 2014, 08:42 AM   #1444
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The earthquake faults around downtown LA, including the same fault that just had a 5.2 quake a few weeks ago, are given the probability of going from a 7.0 to 7.5. That must be a typo. No modern building in LA is rated for "only" a 6.2. This thing should be rated to a 7.5 IMO.
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Old April 27th, 2014, 08:43 AM   #1445
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Oh, and here is a photo from today looking at downtown from Baldwin Hills. The big cranes on the left side of the photo are the Wilshire Grand.

[IMG]http://i60.************/sdi7gx.jpg[/IMG]
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Old April 27th, 2014, 10:07 AM   #1446
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Quote:
The building is located near 29 fault lines with the closest only 1,000 feet from the building. That fault line is capable of producing a 6.2 magnitude earthquake, so the building was designed to withstand an earthquake up to 6.2 ...
The article stipulates that the closest (known) fault is ~1,000 feet from the site of building construction, and that the fault in question is speculated to be capable of producing an event of magnitude M6.2.

It is important to understand that the moment magnitude (M) of a seismic event is not a measurement of its shaking force, but the amount of energy released from the earth during the event itself along the involved fault(s). Peak ground acceleration (the violence at which the earth physically quakes) varies greatly from one event to another. By coincidence, the '94 Northridge event registered the strongest ground shaking EVER instrumentally recorded, and only released enough energy to register M6.7 because the area that ruptured was localized to the western portion of the San Fernando Valley. By comparison, the Chilean earthquake of 1960 was M9.5, ruptured some 650 miles of crust, but did not produce as high a peak ground acceleration as the Northridge event.

It is important to also understand that ground acceleration weakens the farther one's distance from an event's epicenter. While the southern segment of the San Andreas Fault is overdue for a major rupture and can produce a M7.8-8.0 event, its location is some ~60 miles from the downtown Los Angeles area at its closest. When it eventually slips, it will be catastrophic for those Southern Californians in its immediate proximity, but the shaking it will cause in metropolitan Los Angeles will not be severe.

Again, the quoted article suggests the immediate threat to the tower is the fault that can produce a M6.2 energy event RIGHT next to it. However, I still agree that whoever researched the article misconstrued the information they received. Assuredly the tower has been built to code to withstand ground shaking far in excess of what is possible from a M6.2 quake. It's the same logic behind why a bungie cord supports several times the jumper's weight instead of the jumper's exact weight.
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Old April 27th, 2014, 09:06 PM   #1447
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Pics taken on 27 Apr 2014...

Construction Progress...

[IMG]http://i61.************/jv0xao.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i58.************/jsm2wz.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i61.************/14wzn5u.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i60.************/v430id.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i60.************/34y7bj9.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i62.************/33451m9.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i62.************/29zptmp.jpg[/IMG]
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Old May 2nd, 2014, 09:13 AM   #1448
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Wilshire Grand making progress.

DSC_0542 by mojeda101, on Flickr

DSC_0548 by mojeda101, on Flickr

DSC_0549 by mojeda101, on Flickr
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Old May 2nd, 2014, 09:38 PM   #1449
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This thing'll fly off the ground in no time
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Old May 3rd, 2014, 06:15 AM   #1450
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Interesting article, It is pretty long, although I quote a lot of what I considered more intersting, the entire article is about twice as long.

You should go to the original article, it has also a phto gallery and a video clip.


Behind the Grand Pour: Building L.A.'s new tallest tower

http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-w...#ixzz30cM9kY2G

Quote:
Michael Marchesano gazed out the window of his third-floor office in downtown Los Angeles and didn't like what he saw. In a far corner of an excavated pit, five stories deep and the size of a city block, stood a mound of dirt as big as a small house. It wasn't supposed to be there.

The weekend construction crew, looking like toy figures, was occupied with other jobs: tying together steel reinforcing bars, stringing polyethylene tubing, arc-welding a raker beam into a lag wall.

Over the next three years, workers will raise the New Wilshire Grand tower 1,100 feet above the corner of Figueroa Street and Wilshire Boulevard. With an open promenade and an enormous swoop of glass above the entrance, this translucent airplane wing 73 stories tall promises to redefine architectural possibilities in a city not known for its tall buildings.

Beneath its design is the engineering of what is arguably the most complicated high-rise ever built in the United States. Calculated to sway during powerful Santa Anas and absorb ground movement during the most severe earthquakes, it is wedded aesthetically and technically to the unique footprint of the region.

But what mattered now was a pile of dirt.

Marchesano, a general superintendent for Turner Construction Co., knew he had no time to haul it away. A countdown clock on the wall gave him 7 days, 11 hours, 36 minutes, 7.8 seconds before the start of the Grand Pour, an ambitious attempt to lay the foundation of the building's central tower in one overnight session.
Quote:
The dirt mound was the next step. Just off to a side, they would have to work around it until it could be removed.

Then they would be ready to receive 2,120 truckloads of concrete in a hole 18 feet deep and nearly two-thirds the size of a football field. It had to be poured without interruption in less than 30 hours.
Quote:
Let other skyscrapers in other cities be built upon piles and caissons driven into bedrock. The foundation for the Wilshire Grand is a concrete slab.

Its specifications were drawn up by engineers, who after calculating the height and weight of the tower and the forces associated with earthquakes and windstorms, determined that it needed to contain 21,200 cubic yards of concrete and 7.1 million pounds of reinforcing steel.

By some calculations, those ingredients are enough to build an entire 10-story office building.

Quote:
First came dismantling the old Wilshire Grand piece by piece, followed by hauling away about 250 truckloads of dirt each night for nearly six months. Now Marchesano had to make sure that the pour was even possible.

He penciled out the constraints.

For one, the concrete had to be laid within 90 minutes of being mixed, otherwise it would begin to set and not meet the requirements for the job. Also, the work had to be completed in less than three shifts, otherwise the truck drivers would violate federal regulations and exceed their allowable 15 hours on the road.

As Marchesano did the math, he wondered if the site had room for the pumps needed to ferry the concrete from mixing trucks into the pit. He turned to the computer geeks down the hall, wizards at plotting and spinning in cyberspace the footprint of the construction site and the surrounding streets.

They found room for 19, more than enough, and calculated their placement, each within a foot. Anything out of alignment, and Marchesano would have a safety hazard and traffic jam on his hands.

With each pump averaging 100 cubic yards an hour, the job would take approximately two shifts and no more than a weekend.

Marchesano found that CalPortland Co. had eight mixing plants no more than a half-hour drive from downtown. He locked up the concrete, and CalPortland began shipping supplies early: cement from Mojave and Colton, aggregate from Irwindale.

The most critical aspect of the pour, however, would take place some 16 hours after the last truck left the site.

Often described as a fruitcake, concrete is a mixture of cement, aggregate and, in this case, fly ash that heats up when water is added, forming crystals that lend the material its strength. The heat typically dissipates in most pours, but the size and the depth of this slab meant the temperature would increase over the course of nearly two weeks. If not controlled, it would eventually crack the crystal structure, turning the slab into gravel.

With the help of a national expert in the field of concrete thermodynamics, Turner installed a radiator system in the foundation: a succession of looping hoses, 90,000 feet of polypropylene, that would draw off the heat by circulating 40,000 gallons of water chilled to 45 degrees. The hoses, eventually filled with grout, would remain in the slab.

Because of concrete's sensitivity to heat, the construction company monitored long-range weather forecasts. A heat wave — mid-80s or higher — would increase the temperature of the delivered concrete beyond the capability of the chilling system.

As the countdown clock approached zero, mechanics and supply trucks were poised to repair the concrete pumps if any failed. An infirmary was staffed, and tarps and tents were stockpiled in case of rain. The outside temperature was within margins.

At this point, only a lightning storm would delay the pour. The booms, angling into the pit, could serve as conductors.
Quote:
Inspectors fabricated 1,008 football-size cylinders of concrete, which would eventually be shattered in vises to make sure the mixture met the required strength of 6,000 pounds per square inch.

When the last of the concrete reached the pit at 11:30 Sunday morning, the slab measured 17 feet, 7 inches deep. The remaining five inches would be added at a later date to provide a more polished look.

Go to the original Gif image using this link, it has some text that doesn't show when posted.

http://www.latimes.com/la-me-g-footp...#axzz30cLcSugF

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Old May 3rd, 2014, 06:43 AM   #1451
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Western United States


When we referred to building height rankings while giving tours of downtown L.A., it was always 'west of the Mississippi', as in 'Library Tower is the tallest building west of the Mississippi'
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Old May 3rd, 2014, 07:15 AM   #1452
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Originally Posted by weidncol View Post
According to the article, they are calling this tower the

If I remember correctly, One WTC is. It's even taller than this when measuring to roof height.
Since when the City of New York, located in the East Coast of the United States, moved across the entire continent to the western side?

I guess you are confused with the Western Hemisphere. 1WTC has been declared the tallest tower of it, as measured to the top of the spire (if that's fair would be another discussion)
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Old May 3rd, 2014, 07:16 AM   #1453
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Mojeda you keep beating me by hours. So went by the site this morning around 9am. Man was it hot!! Got burned after watching for just 15 minutes. Anyways here's a photo update:

Photo Update: 05/02/2014
Slowing climbing. Levels P4 through P2 are being poured.
100_7552 by rudowntown, on Flickr

Rebar for the remaining P2 level, and P1.
100_7553 by rudowntown, on Flickr

I have no idea what this hole is for. My guess is the foundation for the parking /retail podium. What i don't get is why there doing it section by section.
100_7554 by rudowntown, on Flickr

perimeter columns are starting to come around.
100_7555 by rudowntown, on Flickr
100_7556 by rudowntown, on Flickr
100_7557 by rudowntown, on Flickr
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Old May 3rd, 2014, 08:04 AM   #1454
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pretty massive core!
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Old May 5th, 2014, 12:05 PM   #1455
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The last update was three days ago and a lot has already changed.
5/4/14

Wilshire Grand

DSC_0446 by Kelifornia, on Flickr

DSC_0447 by Kelifornia, on Flickr

DSC_0448 by Kelifornia, on Flickr
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Old May 5th, 2014, 01:38 PM   #1456
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The foundation work is progressing well
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Old May 5th, 2014, 01:58 PM   #1457
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Things go fast here. Core is already rising and some large parts of the foundation need to be done yet.
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Old May 5th, 2014, 03:38 PM   #1458
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Looks great. Glad to see it moving forward.
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Old May 6th, 2014, 12:09 AM   #1459
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almost chinese speed
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Old May 6th, 2014, 06:12 AM   #1460
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Almost
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