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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:40 PM   #41
Federicoft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lesart View Post
By the way...what is the construction cost?
150 million euros.

BTW it will open in 2010, that was just a pre-opening event.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:41 PM   #42
paoloroma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gherkin View Post
Really annoyed I wasn't allowed in when I visited 2 weeks ago! When did it open?
It didn't open yet. Inauguration is scheduled for 2010.
They had a two-day "architectural preview" over the weekend with the museum open to the public (upon reservation) but no works of art exhibited yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gherkin View Post
I wish it was more open
That would be cool but they did a good job in making the fence a work of art on it own and also keep it as open as possible - the one you see in the image below is a sliding door several meters long which obsviously wasn't open when you visited


Last edited by paoloroma; November 16th, 2009 at 09:53 PM.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 10:29 PM   #43
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Zaha Hadid's stairway into the future

With its swooping curves, impossible angles and haunting views, Zaha Hadid's new museum of 21st-century art is her best work yet. Jonathan Glancey gets a guided tour in Rome

Jonathan Glancey
guardian.co.uk, Monday 16 November 2009 21.30 GMT

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesi...did-maxxi-rome

I remember looking at Zaha Hadid's drawings for Rome's new museum of 21st-century arts a decade ago and wondering how on earth this structural adventure would ever be built. On paper, it looked like a surreal motorway intersection imagined by JG Ballard, or a wiring diagram plotted for the palace of esoteric giants. Her floor plans were some of the most mesmerising and challenging since Frank Lloyd Wright unveiled his seemingly improbable designs for New York's Guggenheim museum more than 50 years ago.

What was so radical about them? The walls of Hadid's new museum, unveiled to the public this month, not only curve but change in depth as they do so. There are moments where walls become floors and even threaten to become ceilings, diving and curving like bobsleigh tracks. (When I went there last week, Hadid told me she wanted the building's concrete curves to "unwind like a ribbon in space".) All of this means that the gallery has been an enormous challenge to build.

It took Wright 15 years to realise the Guggenheim; it has taken Hadid 10 to complete Maxxi, as the museum is known (a play on the Roman numerals for 21st century). There have been at least six changes of national government in Italy since the project was first announced in 1998, from left to centre to right, and the future of many such public projects has often seemed doubtful. But now here it stands, in the residential and military Flaminio district, almost exactly as Hadid and her team first imagined it.

Open to the public over the past two weekends as an architectural shell, the museum will launch fully next spring. Only then will it be possible to judge whether Maxxi, Hadid's finest built work to date, is a real success. Just how will the museum's curators make use of these extraordinary public spaces and gigantic galleries? What will go on show?

The truth is that although the museum, devoted to both architecture and art, has been busy collecting work by Anish Kapoor, Gerhard Richter, Francesco Clemente and many others (along with the archives of architects Carlo Scarpa, Aldo Rossi and Pier Luigi Nervi), this light-filled labyrinth is dedicated to the future. There is no great hurry to fill it, after all: there is the rest of the 21st century to go before the museum can be called complete.

Perhaps this is why Hadid has chosen to make Maxxi an almost modest, if not quite self-effacing, building from the outside. She says she hopes it will be fashion-proof. As you approach, it is only the big flags emblazoned with the name Maxxi that guarantee you have come to the right place. Instead, Hadid has reserved her architectural firepower for the interior.

The huge entrance lobby sets the tone, punching up through the height of the building and offering views into what appear to be ineffable depths. This is a museum of just a few heroic galleries, but with a variety of ways of reaching them. Daylight is ever-present; this can be blacked out if need be for exhibition purposes, though the sun is always held at bay, with light filtered through a two-tier system of roof-mounted louvres and screens. Artificial lighting is concealed wherever possible. If curators wish to divide the galleries, floating walls can be hung from the dark concrete ribs snaking throughout the building; these can also support sculpture weighing up to a tonne. The gallery's project architect, Gianluca Racana, says: "We didn't want anything – air-conditioning grilles or light fittings – to take away from the raw power of the spaces we've created, or from the art that will be on show."

This is a building of few colours: black, white, grey and the varied cream of exposed concrete. The walls and balustrades of the gallery's extraordinary stairs and passageways have been finished in the thick black primer used as an undercoat for new cars. (Highly durable and slightly rough to look at, the paint is surprisingly smooth to the touch.) The stairways rise up through the lobby, with their bare metal treads, disappearing mysteriously into the far recesses of the museum; the effect is cinematic – Piranesian, even – and wholly compelling.

There is a point on the first floor where you can choose to walk in one of three directions, between galleries, stairwells, liftshafts and lobbies. Two of these paths take you into the heart of the exhibition spaces, while a third projects you out of the main body of the museum, along a glazed walkway, allowing you to look in at the gallery as if from the outside – a haunting effect. "For me, it's like standing in [Rome's] Piazza del Popolo," Hadid says. "When you look north, you see the tridente [three streets set between two 17th-century baroque churches] offering you this sudden and thrilling choice of direction. Yet, coming south, all three streets lead back to the same single point."

This is a brave project, and little short of incredible in a city that has proved so deeply conservative over the past decade. In recent years, there has been little imaginative new architecture in Rome, least of all in the public sector. But, remarkably, Maxxi is funded by what is now the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, or, as it describes itself, "a laboratory for artistic experimentation and production that gives voice to the different languages of contemporariness". Rome's history is inexhaustible, but it is good to see the city moving forward.

In one sense, however, Maxxi is happily old-fashioned. It has been built on-site by local contractors using materials close to hand; Rome led the way when it came to concrete construction 2,000 years ago, and these ambitious new curved walls are made of Roman concrete. "It does sound odd when I say it," says Racana, "but this has been a little like building a medieval cathedral." And, like a medieval cathedral, the museum is in fact several structures gathered together. Tough new legislation ensuring the ability of new buildings to withstand seismic shock was put in place after the earthquake of October 2002, which rocked Italy's Molise and Puglia regions, and was felt in Rome. As a result, the museum consists of five separate buildings leaning against one another, designed to withstand powerful natural shocks.

Last week, the roof of Hadid's aquatic centre for the 2012 Olympics was unveiled, a wavy promise of things to come. Hadid won't be pressed on this, and says she will be happy to talk about the building only when it is complete, once the pools are filled and the swimmers are training. "All people want to do is talk about the budget, as if the rise in cost has been something we've caused. We haven't. We've done what we've been asked to do." Her hope, and that of the Olympic committee, is that the building will inspire Britain's sporting stars.

Likewise, I have a feeling that the energy and imagination of this new museum, its sense of intrigue and possibilities, will bring out the best in its curators. Who knows what twists and turns architecture will take in the course of the 21st century; for now, Hadid's gallery offers an exhilarating set of Roman walls to build upon.

Last edited by paoloroma; November 18th, 2009 at 09:44 PM.
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Old May 29th, 2010, 10:33 AM   #44
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http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/e476218e-6...44feab49a.html

Rome's Maxxi is open at last
By Rachel Spence

Published: May 29 2010 00:17 | Last updated: May 29 2010 00:17



There were times when we thought we’d never get here,” admits Anna Mattirolo, the director of the art programme at Maxxi, Italy’s first national museum of contemporary art and architecture, which opens in Rome this weekend.

The inauguration is the centrepiece of a festival of contemporary events in the city, which includes the unveiling of the new wing of the municipal contemporary art museum, MACRO, by the French architect Odile Decq, and the Road to Contemporary Art, a selling fair now in its third year taking place at Macro’s other exhibition space, Macro Future.

For residents of the city of Bernini and Michelangelo, this flurry of contemporary activity is being greeted enthusiastically, and Maxxi’s opening represents a triumph of hope over adversity. Commissioned from Zaha Hadid in 1999, the museum was slated to open in 2006 but its €150m construction was continually interrupted by lack of funds. Finally completed in autumn 2009, the building, a flowing cascade of cement, glass and steel, was hailed as an architectural masterpiece. Yet controversy is still swirling. There has been criticism that the collection lacks depth while the decision to open with a retrospective of Gino De Dominicis, an Italian artist who died in 1998, has led to accusations that the museum is shy of embracing its contemporary mandate.

There are also financial issues to be resolved. Since Hadid’s commission, Italy’s cultural budget has dropped from €2.1bn to €1.72bn and is forecast to drop by a further €600m over the next two years. Consequently, Maxxi’s annual budget is pared down to €10m-12m a year, of which the ministry of culture has promised to furnish €4m-5m. Maxxi’s president, Pio Baldi, estimates that a further €2.5m-€3m will come in from the restaurant, which won’t open until the autumn, the bookshop, events rental and ticket sales.

To facilitate the private contributions that will be also be essential, Maxxi is now controlled by an eponymous foundation. Nevertheless, sponsorship is hard to come by. According to Baldi, the fashion house Fendi is keen to make “a significant contribution” although he won’t be drawn on a figure. Other possible sources are the electricity distributor Terna, Italian Telecom and BMW.

Such straitened circumstances demand that the museum manage with just 25 full-time staff. The lack of funds has also restrained acquisitions. Although there are works by artists such as Anish Kapoor and William Kentridge, there is a prevalence of younger, less famous names such as Lara Favaretto, Grazia Toderi and the Albanian-born, Milan-based Adrian Paci. Yet in a country where young contemporary artists struggle for recognition, the presence of so much young talent can only be positive.

“What people must accept is that our collection began just five years ago in a desperate economic climate,” claims Mattirolo, pointing out that she has access to the collection of the nearby National Gallery of Modern Art as well as loans from other Italian museums. “Obviously, we hope that it will grow.”

It is unfair to compare Maxxi too closely with its peers in London and Paris. So mighty is the city’s historic patrimony, the contemporary scene has been neglected for decades. “Maxxi has arrived very late, so it must cover many years when the state took no responsibility for the contemporary,” explains Mattirolo.

Maxxi’s annual visitor forecasts appear comparatively low (between 250,000 and 500,000; Tate Modern welcomed 5m in its first year), but that is a measure of the wealth of other cultural attractions in Rome. Maxxi must also overcome Italy’s ingrained regionalism. “I think Romans are proud of Maxxi,” observes Lorcan O’Neill, one of Rome’s leading commercial gallerists`. “But I’m not sure that Venetians, Torinese and Palermitani are even aware of it.”

The directors are determined that the museum’s reputation will not depend solely on its exhibition programme. Maxxi architecture, for example, houses archives of Italy’s leading modernists, such as Carlo Scarpa and Pier Luigi Nervi. Research, education and publishing projects are under way and the education department has an active outreach programme.

This weekend, however, the spotlight will be on the shows themselves. Highlights of a preview glimpse include a monograph of the architect Luigi Moretti, who designed Washington’s Watergate complex, beautifully elucidated in a serpentine of vast photographs that mimicked the gallery’s curves. Although in future the disciplines will have separate shows, the main inaugural exhibition, Spazio, mixes works from the permanent art collection and installations by 10 architectural studios. “We thought it would be interesting to have that confrontation because we want our museum to be emotive rather than purely didactic,” says Margherita Guccione, director of Maxxi architecture.

Beautifully showcased by the sloping top-floor gallery whose glass wall is dramatically cantilevered over the piazza, the hieratic faces in the late De Dominicis’ retrospective cast such a lyrical spell it is hard to criticise their presence. Nevertheless, it seems a missed opportunity for one of Italy’s many talented living artists.

When the empty museum threw open its doors last November, the biggest doubt was whether a building which was a sculpture in its own right would eclipse the art it was designed to display. The real danger, however, may be that Maxxi’s artworks will be treated with undue reverence. Temporary structures – niches, rotundas, screens – instil a rhythm crucial to galleries otherwise defined by their extreme fluidity, but at times such shrine-like presentation runs counter to the witty, anti-monumental sensibility of a film such as “Preparing the Flute” by William Kentridge or “Democrazy” by Francesco Vezzoli.

Maxxi’s directors should remember that behind the success of museums such as Tate Modern and the Guggenheim Bilbao lies an awareness that the power of much contemporary art resides in its playful transience. These 21st-century museums are playgrounds as much as temples, places to chill as well as worship; Maxxi may need to take risks that run counter to the conservativism that so often strangles the potential of Italy’s rich culture.

A case in point is the recent appointment by the minister of culture, Sandro Bondi, of Vittorio Sgarbi as both the commissioner of the Italian Pavilion at the Venice 2011 Biennale and as a consultant on all Italian state museum acquisitions. Sgarbi, who has described Maxxi’s acquisition policy as “deprived of originality”, is primarily an expert on the Renaissance; his position of influence on the contemporary scene undermines the museum’s nascent authority. In particular, it compromises what should be a fruitful rapport between Maxxi and Italy’s Biennale pavilion.

Knowing Italy, it’s unlikely these Machiavellian power games will resolve themselves quickly. Meanwhile, Maxxi should open its restaurant as soon as possible – and consider buying a Jeff Koons puppy.

http://www.maxxi.beniculturali.it


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Last edited by Pincio; May 29th, 2010 at 10:51 AM.
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Old May 29th, 2010, 12:41 PM   #45
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http://www.lemonde.fr/depeches/2010/..._42579531.html

Deux femmes font entrer l'architecture contemporaine dans la Ville éternelle
AFP | 29.05.10 | 06h20

C'est à deux femmes architectes, l'Anglo-Irakienne Zaha Hadid et la Française Odile Decq, qu'est revenue la tâche délicate d'insérer deux musées au design résolument contemporain dans le tissu de la Ville éternelle, plutôt hermétique aux folies des archistars. D'un côté, le Musée national des arts du XXIe siècle (MAXXI - www.maxxi.beniculturali.it), un ovni de béton, verre et acier signé Zaha Hadid et sorti de terre après dix longues années de travaux, qui ouvre finalement dimanche ses portes au public. De l'autre, le Musée d'art contemporain de Rome (MACRO - www.macro.roma.museum), un bijou rouge et noir d'Odile Decq dissimulé derrière les façades d'une ancienne brasserie, qui peut être visité jusqu'à dimanche soir mais n'ouvrira vraiment qu'en octobre. Deux femmes, deux styles. Zaha Hadid a choisi le blanc comme couleur dominante dans son bâtiment qui s'ouvre sur une piazza et est inondé par la lumière romaine, ce qui rend parfois problématique la visibilité des oeuvres exposées. L'architecte elle-même n'est pas saisie par le doute: "C'est très beau, je crois que ça fonctionne", estime dans un entretien à l'AFP Mme Hadid, impériale au milieu d'une myriade d'assistants et de gardes du corps. "Lorsqu'on a organisé des portes ouvertes, le musée a littéralement été envahi. Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont curieux et viendront le voir", affirme-t-elle. A l'intérieur, le parcours sinueux fait d'escaliers et de pentes douces n'est pas sans rappeler la spirale imaginée par Frank Lloyd Wright pour le musée Guggenheim de New York. Lignes épurées, courbes fluides. Selon son auteur, "le MAXXI n'est pas seulement un musée mais aussi un centre culturel composé d'un tissu dense d'espaces intérieurs et extérieurs qui dialoguent les uns avec les autres, à travers un entrecroisement de galeries qui s'ouvrent sur une grande place". La "piazza" romaine, lieu de circulation mais aussi de vie et de rencontre, est au coeur du projet réalisé par Odile Decq, qui a dessiné sur le toit-terrasse de son bâtiment "une place publique, avec sa fontaine, et à côté un restaurant qui s'ouvre sur la place, comme sur toutes les +piazze+ de Rome". Contrairement à sa consoeur, Odile Decq a élargi sa palette au noir et au rouge: "J'ai tenu à ce que les salles d'exposition restent blanches et relativement neutres pour permettre aux artistes de faire ce qu'ils veulent. Le noir, c'est une autre neutralité, plus forte. Le centre est rouge, parce que c'est la vie, c'est le coeur", raconte-t-elle à l'AFP. Et c'est dans ce coeur à facettes posé dans le foyer du musée qu'elle a choisi de loger un auditorium d'une centaine de places. Son musée est donc un être vivant et ludique qui invite le visiteur à la promenade. "Rome n'est pas une ville d'axes comme Paris, il faut y naviguer de place en place. Dans le musée, c'est pareil, on navigue", déclare la Française, toute de noir vêtue et les cheveux ébouriffés. Le centre historique semblait s'être figé à l'époque fasciste mis à part le musée-écrin aménagé en 2006 au milieu de vives controverses par l'architecte américain Richard Meier pour l'Ara Pacis de l'empereur Auguste. Rome peut désormais s'enorgueillir de deux bâtiments innovants et cet aggiornamento ne s'arrête pas là: deux gratte-ciels devraient surgir d'ici la fin 2011 à l'EUR, le quartier au sud de Rome construit sous Mussolini. Une limite toutefois à cette soudaine audace: aucun des deux ne dépassera les 120 mètres, afin de ne pas éclipser le dôme de la basilique Saint-Pierre, le plus haut du monde, qui culmine à 136,57 mètres.



http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/20...ntemporain.php

Rome: deux musées d'art contemporain

AFP
27/05/2010 | Mise à jour : 18:40 Réagir

Journée historique aujourd'hui à Rome pour l'art contemporain: la Ville éternelle a dévoilé deux nouveaux espaces à l'architecture spectaculaire qui lui sont dédiés et ont pour ambition de rivaliser avec les plus grandes institutions mondiales. Le Musée national des arts du XXIe siècle (MAXXI), un ovni de béton, verre et acier sorti de terre après dix longues années de travaux, est signé par l'Anglo-Irakienne Zaha Hadid, figure de l'architecture internationale.

L'architecte a expliqué avoir voulu "rendre hommage à la tradition de Rome, qui superpose différentes époques et dispose d'une lumière fantastique". La lumière est de fait le personnage central du musée, parfois aux dépens des oeuvres exposées, écrasées par la lumière crue inondant le ciel romain. Construit sur le site d'une ancienne caserne dans le nord de la ville, le MAXXI, qui alterne courbes et angles aigus, joue sur les effets-miroir avec les édifices environnants, pour la plupart construits au XIXe siècle dans des dominantes ocres et jaunes.

Coût de ce bâtiment, prévu pour accueillir entre 200.000 et 400.000 visiteurs par an: 150 millions d'euros pour 21.200 mètres carrés, dont 10.000 mètres carrés d'espaces d'exposition. Pour un coût bien moindre (20 millions d'euros), le Musée d'art contemporain de Rome (MACRO), qui existait déjà au sein d'un bâtiment à l'architecture classique, s'est offert une extension de 10.000 m2 au design audacieux et réussi dessiné par la Française Odile Decq.

Du noir intense et du rouge flambant pour les espaces de circulation, en contraposition avec le blanc immaculé des espaces destinés à accueillir les collections permanentes et les expositions temporaires. L'édifice est surplombé d'une grande terrasse avec fontaine sur laquelle s'ouvre un restaurant: "C'est une place offerte à la ville", note Odile Decq.


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...971810080.html

Rome Turns to the Art of Today
The new Maxxi will try to return the city to its ancient role as an art-world leader

By KELLY CROW
Rome

The Eternal City is better known for its ancient ruins and ornate frescoes than for contemporary art, but it's spending about $188 million in an attempt to catch up.

Next week, the art world will descend on Rome for the opening of its National Museum of 21st Century Arts, better known as the Maxxi, an institution designed by Zaha Hadid to be Italy's first state museum for contemporary art and architecture.

The coiled, concrete building is only half the size of New York's Museum of Modern Art, but it represents arguably the most important project completed by Ms. Hadid since she won the Pritzker Prize six years ago. And since the recession has compelled other museums to pare down, next Friday's opening party for the Maxxi is turning into the major event of the art season.

More than 5,000 people are expected to come by, including Sophia Loren, luxury-goods executive Bernard Arnault, designer Miuccia Prada, artist Giuseppe Penone and members of some of Rome's oldest families, like the Borgheses and the Aldobrandinis.

The museum, which opens to the public May 30, sits like a pile of giant, gray garden hoses curving around an L-shaped plot in the city's northern neighborhood of Flaminio. Inside, black staircases rise from the cavernous white lobby like a drawing by M.C. Escher. Only a few people have been invited to wander through the empty building since construction finished last fall. Now, public scrutiny has shifted from the merits of the Maxxi's building to the question of what to display within it.

The Maxxi's permanent collection of around 300 artworks is a blip compared with the tens of thousands of pieces in major museums. So, many of the works in its four debut exhibitions were lent by other museums or the artists themselves.

"Spazio," which explores how artists and architects encounter the museum's interior, will include international mainstays like Sol LeWitt, William Kentridge and Anish Kapoor. Mr. Kapoor's 2004 sculpture "Widow" is a 49-foot-long black tube suspended in air that culminates in a wide spout shaped like a gramophone. A 130-work survey will focus on Italian favorite Gino de Dominicis, a mystical painter and sculptor whose Paul Bunyan-size "Cosmic Magnet" will sprawl across the museum's plaza.

High-tech pieces by emerging artists from around the world will also pop up throughout the museum. In Swiss artist Katja Loher's "Sculpting in Air," a video of tiny rows of people will be projected onto a helium balloon bobbing in the museum lobby. Looking up at the ceiling, visitors will see Turkish artist Kutluğ Ataman's "Dome," a video series showing people holding up everyday possessions like cellphones—a nod to the symbolic gestures so often given to saintly figures on Roman chapel frescoes.

Michelangelo Pistoletto, whose row of dangling light bulbs will be shown, says living Italian artists now have a temple of their own to aspire to join, as young American artists yearn to have their pieces in MoMA. "It's hugely important for us," he said before a group of potential donors at the museum earlier this spring.

The government paid the €150 million ($188 million) to construct the building, but to fill it up, the museum will need to rely heavily on an important but fragmented group of collectors across Italy whose donations won't be tax-deductible under Italian law. Some, like Milan-based Nicoletta Fiorucci, are rallying around the museum. Others, like lawyer Giovano Giuliani, who just opened his own private museum in Rome, remain wary about the Maxxi's long-term momentum. Mr. Giuliani says, "We have a big car without an engine."

The museum foundation's president, Pio Baldi, says Rome has to start somewhere if it aims to become a contemporary hot spot to rival New York or London. Even Venice boasts a biennial that draws in top curators and has led to new private museums like collector François Pinault's Palazzo Grassi. Mr. Baldi, a veteran of the state's cultural ministry, says officials began planning the Maxxi over a decade ago when they realized how little influence Rome exerted over the art of today.

Italy was a "main leader in Western artistic creativity for six centuries—we gave the world Cimabue, Raphael, Michelangelo and Bernini—so now are we finished?" Mr. Baldi said. "No, it's impossible."

Dealers agree Rome has plenty of marketplace potential. New York's influential Gagosian Gallery caused a minor stir nearly three years ago when it chose Rome over Moscow to be its next gallery outpost. Its subsequent shows of work by artists like Cy Twombly have sold well to local buyers, the gallery says. Its presence has also helped Gagosian cull modern masterworks by Italian artists like Piero Manzoni, whose toga-like white paintings have topped $10 million at auction. Auction houses are likewise hustling to highlight Italy's connection to contemporary art. On June 30, Phillips de Pury & Co. will hold an "Italia" theme auction in London, offering dozens of works by younger Italian designers and artists like Francesco Vezzoli, whose high-concept video pieces often feature celebrities.

Yet change tends to come slowly in Rome, a city both blessed and burdened by its "heavy historical heritage," according to Gabi Scardi, a Milan-based curator who helped oversee the Maxxi's "Spazio" exhibit. Until recently, much of the country's arts funding went to preserving ancient monuments. The city briefly shut down a smaller space for new art, called the Macro, two years ago for lack of funding, but it has since restored that museum's budget and is even helping pay for a new wing. (The Macro is overseen by the city; the Italian government runs the Maxxi.)

Much of the Maxxi's executive staff comes from within the ranks of the cultural ministry, which has pledged to cover 60% of the museum's annual €9 million operating budget. Private donors and telecommunication companies are being courted now to supply the rest, Mr. Baldi said: "We're getting there."

To succeed, the museum would do well to harness the energy of some of the city's younger collectors like Pierpaolo Barzan, a technology entrepreneur whose private art foundation, Depart, has organized several popular pop-up exhibitions in recent months. Last week, artist Anselm Kiefer joined nearly 1,000 people at the opening of Depart's latest show at the American Academy in Rome called "Hungry for Death." The exhibit explores the legacy of a 1970s Michigan band, Destroy All Monsters, whose members included top contemporary artists Mike Kelley and Jim Shaw. Mr. Barzan said he's giving to the Maxxi but may get more involved if its programming takes artistic risks down the line.

The American Academy is also mounting a two-day symposium and exhibit of late works by Philip Guston as part of a citywide arts festival to coincide with the Maxxi's opening. The city's three-year-old contemporary-art fair, Roma—The Road to Contemporary Art, also shifted its dates to May 27-30 from April so that its 67 galleries could benefit from the Maxxi's crowds.

Fair director Roberto Casiraghi says the Maxxi's artistic ambitions should be even bigger than its new building. Employing the Latin phrase celebrating Imperial Rome's heyday, he said: "Roma, Caput Mundi —that's what we want."



http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/feedarticle/9099362

Contemporary art museum to open in Rome
AP foreign, Thursday May 27 2010

Associated Press Writer= ROME (AP) — A huge museum for contemporary arts and architecture opens in Rome this weekend in a bid to draw avant-garde art lovers to a city defined by its ancient monuments and Baroque fountains.

The MAXXI museum designed by Iraqi-born architect Zaha Hadid is the latest and most ambitious project to try to refresh the Italian capital's image of a decadent city bent on its glorious past.

"My work just really stems from the fact that we can make new juxtapositions with the old," Hadid told The Associated Press during Thursday's preview opening. "The idea of connecting between the old and new is very critical."

The museum marks its opening with a three-day extravaganza that included the unveiling Thursday of inaugural exhibits; a party Friday night for 5,000 artists, fashionistas, aristocrats and other VIPs; and an admission-free day for a fortunate few thousand ticket holders.

On Sunday, MAXXI will open to the public.

The €150 million ($223 million) MAXXI is made of white curving cement walls, intricate black stairways that connect halls and pathways, and floor-to-ceiling windows that give the museum natural light and visitors a look out onto the neighborhood.

From the outside, the museums looks like a wide structure that expands horizontally rather than vertically. Built on the grounds of a former military barracks — of which a facade is still recognizable — MAXXI is located in a residential neighborhood outside the city's historic center.

Officials unveiling the opening exhibit Thursday stressed the link between old and new, their belief that a city and nation that have been on the avant-garde of art and architecture for centuries should be promoting contemporary arts.

For Hadid, who became the first woman to win the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004, the challenge was to work with the "layers" of Rome's artistic past and bring a new space for art in the city. She recalled visiting Rome in the 1960s and posing in front of the Trevi Fountain, a masterpiece of Baroque art.

"Rome has fantastic light," Hadid said. "The idea of this project is about layering and bringing in light to the space so that you have a naturally lit space — and to give the curators tremendous freedom in the way they can organize exhibits."

Rome is visited by millions of people each year, mostly attracted to the artistic glories of its past — the ancient ruins, the Colosseum, the fountains designed by Bernini or Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel.

In recent years, officials have tried to expand Rome's culture offerings with some cutting-edge works, but these efforts have met mixed responses. Romans have been hostile to some new buildings, apparently not convinced that a modern structure can successfully stand beside the marvels of the past.

For example, the structure by Richard Meier that houses the 2,000-year-old altar Ara Pacis has drawn widespread criticism, including from the current city mayor. Renzo Piano's Auditorium, which opened in 2002, has been more widely appreciated, giving Rome its first major-league concert hall and becoming a hip spot and the venue of the new movie festival in the Italian capital.

The Culture Ministry awarded the project for the MAXXI to Hadid after an international competition in 1998.

The inaugural shows' highlight is "Space," an exhibit that takes visitors along a route of art works by Anish Kapoor, Sol Lewitt and Francesco Vezzosi and others, combined with installations by architecture studios. Mixing art and architecture, the show represents MAXXI's dual soul.

Other inaugural shows feature a retrospective on Gino De Dominicis, an eclectic and controversial Italian artist who died a decade ago; a reflection on the relations between East and West through eight video works by young Turkish artist Kutlug Ataman; and photographs, models and drawings by Italian architect Luigi Moretti.

MAXXI also houses an auditorium, libraries, work shops and spaces for live events and commercial activities.

The museum had a limited weekend opening in November.



http://www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2010/0...274969019.html

ARQUITECTURA | Nace el 'Maxxi', de Zaha Hadid
La vieja Roma se abre a la arquitectura contemporánea

Irene Hdez. Velasco (corresponsal) | Roma
Actualizado jueves 27/05/2010 21:00 horas

El Panteón, la Basílica de San Pedro, el Coliseo... Roma cuanta con algunas de las más magníficos ejemplos arquitectónicos del mundo. Sin embargo, y a pesar de albergar 3.000 años de historia, la capital italiana tenía una importante asignatura pendiente: la arquitectura contemporánea. Un vacío al que está poniendo remedio. La vieja Roma, por fin, está abriendo sus puertas a la modernidad.

El último ejemplo es el Maxxi, el primer museo de arte contemporáneo de Roma. Diseñado por la britránico/iraní Zaha Hadid -primera mujer en lograr el premio Pritzker-, el edificio acaba de ser completado después de 11 años de trabajo y será oficialmente inaugurado como museo en marzo próximo.

Por su forma sinuosa ha sido bautizado la 'Serpiente de acero'. Pero el Maxxi, una imponente estructura de 29.000 metros cuadrados en la que destacan el cemento y el cristal, ya está transformando el perfil de Roma. Y no es el único caso.

Muy cerca del Maxxi se encuentra el Auditorio Parque de la Música, un complejo multifuncional que lleva la firma de Renzo Piano y que está formado por tres salas que, vistas desde fuera, evocan el aspecto de unos escarabajos galácticos.

Pero, sin duda alguna, el más significativa (y polémico) paso que ha dado Roma en materia de arquitectura contemporánea es el Museo del Ara Pacis, diseñado por Richard Mier. Se trata del primer edificio contemporáneo levantado en el centro histórico de Roma desde los tiempos del fascismo.

Ahora que ha descubierto la modernidad, la capital italiana no piensa darle la espalda. De hecho, ya están en marcha los trabajos de lo que será el nuevo centro de congresos de Roma, un edificio diseñado por Maximiliano Fuksas y al que en la capital italiana ya se conoce como "la nube". La construcción, que debería abrir sus puertas en la segunda mitad de 2010, se compondrá de un estructura de cristal transparente dentro del cual se encontrará, como suspendida en el aire, la sala-auditorio.
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Old May 30th, 2010, 11:45 AM   #46
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That's a masterpiece!
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...sono qui ad aspettar la Metro.......la 4!!
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Old May 30th, 2010, 10:16 PM   #47
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Another architectural jewel in the Eternal City. Thanks Zaha.
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Old May 30th, 2010, 10:35 PM   #48
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Yet another great creation by Zaha Hadid
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Old May 30th, 2010, 10:46 PM   #49
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Luca, maybe you could share some of your pictures with another SSC users? I have seen some on your FB account and they looked very impressive.
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Old May 30th, 2010, 11:12 PM   #50
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I say its an interesting sculpture, but a bad museum.
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Old May 31st, 2010, 03:39 AM   #51
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inside beautiful, outside ugly
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Old May 31st, 2010, 06:04 AM   #52
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how many users does it expect to host per year?
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Old May 31st, 2010, 09:51 AM   #53
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bbc.co.uk

[IMG]http://i49.************/24vlcop.jpg[/IMG]

Maxxi modern art gallery opens to the public in Rome
A new modern art gallery in the Italian capital Rome has opened to the public for the first time.

The Maxxi cost $200m (£138m) to build and will house hundreds of contemporary pieces as well as hosting lectures and workshops.

The building was designed by Iraqi-born architect Zaha Hadid, who began work on the project 11 years ago.

She said Rome had provided a unique setting for the 27,000 sq/m ultra modern building.

At a press opening on Thursday, she praised the "fantastic light" in the city.

"The idea of this project is about layering and bringing in light to the space so that you have a naturally lit space.

Ms Hadid said the building gave curators "tremendous freedom in the way they can organise exhibits".

The new gallery is made up of two museums - one dedicated to art and the other to architecture.

Opening exhibits feature work from artists including Indian-born sculptor Anish Kapoor and South African artist William Kentridge.

Also on show is a retrospective of the work of Italian artist Gino De Dominicis, whose vast skeleton sculpture is displayed by the gallery entrance.

The Maxxi, officially called the National Museum of the XXI Century Arts, had been due to open in 2005, but the project was delayed by funding debates.

It has been criticised by some for the rising cost and for its strikingly modern appearance in the historical city.

The BBC's Duncan Kennedy in Rome says the city's ancient landmarks will continue to attract tourists in their millions but that the Maxxi offers something new for visitors with a taste for modernity.
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Old May 31st, 2010, 02:25 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pincio View Post
[IMG]http://i50.************/auz11l.jpg[/IMG]
Giant vuvuzela?
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Old May 31st, 2010, 06:01 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickg View Post
how many users does it expect to host per year?
I've read 250.000/300.000. On the inauguration day there were more than 3500 people.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 12:34 PM   #56
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image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
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Old June 5th, 2010, 04:02 AM   #57
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Fantastic piece of architecture!
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Old June 5th, 2010, 04:14 AM   #58
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We `Nou, ik kwam, zei iedereen dat wat wat zou kunnen delen ah
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Old June 5th, 2010, 04:11 PM   #59
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If you people visit Rome, don't miss it.. even if that means you sacrifice time from some of the classic attractions.

Last edited by Rhoy; June 5th, 2010 at 05:43 PM.
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Old June 7th, 2010, 02:22 AM   #60
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looking at the latest pictures I wonder where the art is. There are a lot of stairs and bridges but I had to look very carefully to find any art in this so called museum for art. For me it looks more like a museum for XXI century architecture.
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