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Old January 24th, 2007, 08:31 AM   #221
Skyprince
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Singapore Airlines and Thai have never flown to South America !

As far as I know, among all carriers in Asia , only Malaysia Airlines fly to all continents ( it operates Kuala Lumpur - Buenos Aires twice per week on B747 )
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Old January 24th, 2007, 10:35 AM   #222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SA BOY View Post
US carriers dont do Africa, do they?

Does Thai do South America?
There is an American airline flying to South Africa via Senegal.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 11:11 AM   #223
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Mmm so what`s the destination ? Dubai-- Sao Paulo ?
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Old January 24th, 2007, 11:38 AM   #224
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correct 8 times a week
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Old January 24th, 2007, 11:40 AM   #225
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So the only carriers doing every continent would be
BA
SAA
Lufthansa
Maylasian
Emirates
American?
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Old January 24th, 2007, 11:51 AM   #226
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As far as I know, LAN Chile operates the route Santiago-Aukland-Sydney which in some way facilitates transfers to Asia and the Middle East.
Aerolineas Argentinas used to cover the route Buenos Aires-Johanesburg before their financial crisis. I'm not sure if still that segment is covered.

Iran Air will start twice a week sercive to Caracas, Venezuela via Damascus from Teheran, I think this would be the only direct connection between the middle east with South America for now.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 11:59 AM   #227
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IranAir to Caracas ! Wow !
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Old January 24th, 2007, 12:26 PM   #228
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Yeah, apparently it serves a political purpose more than anything else. President Chavez and his counterpart announced the beggining of services between Teheran and Caracas as of Feb 7, 2007. President Chavez himself will inaugurate the flight to Teheran.
I think Washington won't be very happy with Venezuela's new partner and business enterprisse.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 04:31 PM   #229
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Does JAL fly to Africa? If they do then they fly to all continents too.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 05:57 PM   #230
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If my memory doesn`t fail, i guess the only North american airline that flew to all the world was Pan Am.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 06:09 PM   #231
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no Continental flys I think to Africa as well as United.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 06:11 PM   #232
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Continental and United fly to Africa

American doesnt though and yes Pan Am did fly to every continent. I wish it was still around, all these other airlines like Southwest and Jet blue seem the same and all the big airlines are all bankrupt or its slowly happening to them.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 06:41 PM   #233
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aero_Tacuba View Post
Yeah, apparently it serves a political purpose more than anything else. President Chavez and his counterpart announced the beggining of services between Teheran and Caracas as of Feb 7, 2007. President Chavez himself will inaugurate the flight to Teheran.
I think Washington won't be very happy with Venezuela's new partner and business enterprisse.
cant see any other reason.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 08:35 PM   #234
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Right before their crisis, Varig used to fly to Africa (South Africa), Europe, North America and Asia (Japan). They just didn't fly to Australia. Now they only fly abroad to Buenos Aires lol!

Very good news for Brazil. And the best is that it's gonna be a direct flight! I hope it gets popular and not too expensive.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 08:58 PM   #235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SA BOY View Post
So the only carriers doing every continent would be
BA
SAA
Lufthansa
Maylasian
Emirates
American?
Lufthansa doesn't fly to Australia and American doesn't fly to Africa and Australia.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 09:01 PM   #236
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In the past,Alitalia used to fly to Australia so it served all the continents.
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Old January 25th, 2007, 11:12 AM   #237
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boeing777 View Post
Lufthansa doesn't fly to Australia and American doesn't fly to Africa and Australia.
So its only
SAA
BA
Emirates
Maylasian
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Old August 15th, 2007, 01:48 AM   #238
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Emirates Global Roadshow

Full story...

http://www.emirates.com/usa/AboutEmi...p?yr=2007&St=2

Interesting cities... Some of them don't have EK service at all. Is this some kind of hinting for future plans?
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Old October 30th, 2007, 07:10 PM   #239
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Is the sky the only limit for an expanding airline intent on becoming the world No 1?
29 October 2007
The Times

Working hand in hand with the creators of a dazzling Dubai, Emirates plans to make its $30 billion fleet the global carrier of choice

As sports fans will have noticed, Emirates has attached its name to just about everything it can involving a bat, ball or movement faster than a walk. The Dubai-based airline spent Pounds 100 million on sponsoring Arsenal Football Club and giving its name to the club's new, post-Highbury North London home and it followed this with sponsorship of world cups for football, rugby and cricket and a dozen or so professional sports teams. The carrier is on a branding mission to rival Coca-Cola or Nike.

This strategy is part of Emirates' ambition to become the world's largest and most profitable airline. In recent years growth has been dramatic, doubling every four years, while the legacy carriers of Europe and the United States are stagnating.

Emirates carried 16.7 million passengers last year, making it the ninth largest international carrier. This year it will transport about 20 million, taking it past Singapore Airlines, and if this trend continues it will pass British Airways's 29 million passengers by the end of the decade.

Its growth is built on an idea that is fundamental to understanding Dubai: create supply and demand will follow. The airline has launched services that no European carrier would consider, such as a daily flight between Newcastle and Dubai. The route seems to defy logic, but Emirates believes that by making it available, passengers in the North of England will begin to see Dubai as a possible business and tourist destination. However, the gamble is not cheap: this one route will require access to three aircraft, at a cost of $180 million (Pounds 87.7 million) per plane. Newcastle is, therefore, a half-billion-dollar bet for Emirates.

However, as a state-owned carrier, the profitability or otherwise of the route may never be known. Indeed, it is sometimes difficult to establish where the airline's strategy ends and that of Dubai begins: one reason that Emirates has started the Newcastle route is to feed tourists into Dubai's hotels and leisure attractions.

Exactly how they all cross-subsidise each other, if at all, is unknown.

It is this lack of clarity that worries many Western airline executives. They are not too concerned about routes such as Newcastle-Dubai, but they do have concerns about competition on routes once considered cash cows for European airlines - London or Paris to Dubai, for example. Is Emirates dumping seats on these routes to fill Dubai's hotels? Is the state-owned carrier receiving financial aid to buy its vast new fleet? Airline bosses whisper privately about the subsidies and benefits enjoyed by Emirates and they are lobbying governments to block access to airports.

Although Emirates denies being subsidised, the airline and its home town are closely linked. Emirates' growth feeds Dubai's growth, and vice versa precisely what the rulers of the Gulf state envisaged when they launched the airline in 1985.

For many years Dubai had been a stopover on the long journey east from Europe to Asia and Australasia, but new technology enabled aircraft to fly directly to destinations such as Singapore, Bangkok and Hong Kong. Dubai was in danger of being overflown and ignored. But if Emirates could bring people to the city, perhaps they could be encouraged to get off and spend.

Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed al- Maktoum, uncle of the present Emir, who was asked to take on the challenge, says: "It is happening much faster than anything that had been planned for, but it is only happening this way because Dubai took a calculated risk in terms doing things in such a big way. We had to diversify our economy because Dubai had limited resources. We are a part of the Gulf that has a lot of oil, but Dubai itself has very small quantities of it. We had the idea to develop tourism and it all started at that time, thinking about the future. What we at Emirates have achieved today was thought of back in the 1980s."

Emirates serves 94 destinations in 60 countries, allowing Dubai to attract millions of tourists to its luxury hotels and businessmen to the mini-cities that it has created for media, technology and healthcare specialists. Zero income tax has further enhanced the city's appeal to the rapidly growing community of expatriates from Europe, other parts of the Middle East and Asia.

Sheikh Ahmed said: "We believe we have been supported by what is happening here in Dubai. The development of hotels and shopping malls and other infrastructure has attracted people here. If we didn't have Dubai and this lovely city, it would not be easy to promote the place as a destination. We go hand in hand with Dubai."

This ability to lure tourists and businessmen has been aided by geography. The city is in a unique position as a pivot between the continents of Asia, Europe and Africa. The economies of Asia and India are growing fast and Dubai believes that it can be the hub that directs services and goods between the booming East and the rest of the world -and Emirates will be the means by which these goods and people will travel.

"We are lucky in our location," Sheikh Ahmed said. "Between many destinations, the shortest route is via Dubai. We have been very lucky with that and we use that in terms of the services we decided to launch. For example, if you want to go to Japan from South America, then Dubai is the shortest route in terms of journey time. There are many countries in this position, but they did not take advantage of their geographic position."

Western airline executives are not impressed by the geographical argument and complain that Emirates' success is built on unfair government loans, cash injections, help in financing its massive aircraft acquisitions, cheap fuel and a labour regime that does not allow trade unions.

Sheikh Ahmed rebuts his competitors' allegations. Emirates received $10 million launch financing, enough to lease two aircraft, and has received not a dirham more, he insists: "If we started with subsidies every year, we may not be able to compete in industry today. We had to learn the tough way. The instruction from the Government was that we would have freedom to do business whatever way we wanted, but we don't get to come to the Government for financial support."

Gulf airlines also point out that while they do benefit from labour laws that enable them to avoid the sort of wage and pension bargaining that dogs British Airways on an annual basis, other costs have to be factored in. Emirates, Etihad and Qatar, the three main Gulf carriers, must import their pilots, engineers and cabin crew. The companies must provide housing and perks to attract thousands of staff while at the same time keeping costs low enough to return profits.

Sheikh Ahmed said: "Always people say that it is easy for us because they think every Gulf state is rich. They think everyone is a billionaire and this is the perception for the average person. They say these things because it makes it much easier for them when they don't reach their own goals."

Despite the gripes about special circumstances and financial assistance, Western airline executives admit that Emirates is well-run. Its aircraft are new, its crew attentive and its service among the best.

Emirates' growth has had a wider effect on the aviation and aerospace industry than merely bringing tourists to the Gulf. The airline is buying so many aircraft to feed its growth that it is in a position to force the aerospace giants, Boeing and Airbus, to modify their designs according to Emirates' specifications. The airline has 108 aircraft worth more than $30 billion on order and it continues to flaunt an order for a further 100 under the noses of Boeing and Airbus. Whichever manufacturer wins this order, likely to be worth about $20 billion, will have done so because it has delivered an aircraft made almost exclusively for Emirates. No other airline has this sort of power.

Emirates has a very real chance of becoming the world's largest airline within the next ten years, particularly as it will start to take delivery of a fleet of A380s next year. The 55 A380s that Emirates has on order will give it by far the biggest fleet of this aircraft and the double-decker giants will substantially increase the number of passengers that it can carry out of congested hubs such as Heathrow.

Yet there is a caveat to the growth projections. Airlines are notoriously susceptible to outside shocks, whether it is an economic crunch, a catastrophic accident or the outbreak of a disease such as Sars. Terrorism and political instability are also significant threats to the future of a Middle Eastern airline and whatever the predictions for growth, Emirates is not entirely in control of its destiny.

If the airline succeeds, sports teams and cities such as Newcastle will benefit.

If it fails, 55 of the world's largest aircraft will be parked in the Arabian desert -and going cheap.

CV SHEIKH AHMED BIN SAEED Al-MAKTOUM

* Born in a traditional Arab fort in Shindagha, an area of Dubai located between Dubai's Creek and the sea. After attending school in Dubai, he studied in England and went on to university in the United States

* Chairman and chief executive of Emirates Airline and Group, which includes Dnata, the sole ground handling agency at Dubai International Airport and the biggest travel agency in the Middle East, as well as subsidiary companies

* President of the department of Dubai Civil Aviation, a governing body that oversees the activities of the Dubai International Airport, Dubai Cargo Village, Dubai Duty Free, Dubai International Hotel and Dubai Aviation Club. He is also deputy chairman of the Executive Council, the chairman of the Dubai Airport Free Zone Authority, chairman of the Supreme Committee of the Dubai Shopping Festival and Dubai Summer Surprises, director of Dubai Golf Club and director of the Dubai Creek Golf & Yacht Club and chairman of Alliance Insurance Co., Dubai International Marine Club, the British University in Dubai and Dubai Power and Energy Committee

* Sheikh Ahmed belongs to the generation of young and influential Emiratis who are building the bridge between Dubai's traditional past and its future in the century ahead.

* The younger brother of the late ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed al-Maktoum, Sheikh Ahmed embarked on his journey in the aviation industry in 1985 when he became chairman of Emirates Airline on the company's establishment

* Recipient of the French award Commandeur de l'Ordre de la Legion d'Honneur, December 2003

SEVEN WONDERS

1 The United Arab Emirates has a population of four million but two airlines - Emirates and Etihad -that will carry about 25 million passengers this year. Both have aggressive expansion plans, leading analysts to question where they will find future customers

2 Qatar has built an airport terminal just for first-and business-class passengers, although the main terminal building lacks air bridges

3 Dubai is building an elevated metro system that eventually will be 70km long.

The first phase will cost $4.2 billion and run 35km. Its undulating route has led to it being nicknamed "the rollercoaster"

4 Dubai's Jebel Ali port is the largest manmade harbour in the world. It is 134 sq km in area and handles eight million containers a year. This is expected to rise to 67 million by 2030 after the port is expanded

5 Dubai World Central is a new airport being built near the Jebel Ali port. It will be 140 sq km in area, the same size as Cardiff, and have the capacity to handle 150 million passengers a year. It will also become the world's biggest cargo terminal, handling 12 million tonnes a year

6 Qatar and the UAE are proposing to build a 300km causeway to link the two countries. Qatar and Bahrain are already working on a $4 billion project to construct a 40km causeway

7 Dubai's traffic congestion is notorious. According to the Roads and Transport Authority, there are six rush hours a day. During rush hour, 15 minutes out of every 25 is spent in congestion
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Old October 30th, 2007, 08:25 PM   #240
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Emirates is run on all oil money from dubai with airport, landing rights, buying planes everything funded.......they are building everything with excpectations of demand but there isn't that much yet. With Indian carriers expanding internationally emirates should take a hit! Once emirates looses grip on Indian cities thats the end of them. With the salaries.....they need to keep them high as they want people to stay there and work because given a chance everyone is leaving......and wasn't there some controversy over emirates reporting its profits?
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