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Old June 5th, 2010, 04:22 AM   #121
Marathaman
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It can't be clay. Usually these things are made from brick with a stone base.
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

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Old June 9th, 2010, 10:37 AM   #122
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For a Panoramic view of Thali Mahaganapathy Temple , Calicut, click Here
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Old June 12th, 2010, 01:31 AM   #123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusionist View Post
I think different temples have differnt trusts. Some get fundings from different sources. Yes the govt. is responsible for the temples in its territory but what really the country needs is more active involvement, interest etc from the public to thier temples. How many graduates seriously study temple architecture ? How many temple goers actually do appreciate architecture etc ? Unless the public mood changes there is no solution.
Fusionist, it is quite beautiful to see the way Sri Lankan temples are maintained. All the trusts are gone once the government steps in. This is what endownment board does when it takes over the temple. I have seen ISKCON temples are not touched by gov't. Wonder how they manage them. The control of gov't over Hindu temples must be stopped. Politicians are ***s. They are thiefs of public property. There hands should be chopped off if they ruin a Hindu temple ( look at the negligence of Sri Kalahasti temple and its collapse ). This is the only way we can preserve these temples.
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Old June 12th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skganji View Post
Fusionist, it is quite beautiful to see the way Sri Lankan temples are maintained. All the trusts are gone once the government steps in. This is what endownment board does when it takes over the temple. I have seen ISKCON temples are not touched by gov't. Wonder how they manage them. The control of gov't over Hindu temples must be stopped. Politicians are ***s. They are thiefs of public property. There hands should be chopped off if they ruin a Hindu temple ( look at the negligence of Sri Kalahasti temple and its collapse ). This is the only way we can preserve these temples.
Well I will agree with you in principle that temple maintainance in the South definitely needs to improve. I think the core problem lies in the way the Madras Presidency was run, as opposed to Bengal or Bombay.

The Madras Presidency was heavily reliant on missionaries, and infact attributed several administrative duties directly to missionaries like Salvation Army who instilled a sense of alienation amongst the local about thier own culture. The revival of the 'Hindu' activism in the post-missionary era in India again is heavily influenced by the system adopted by the western missionaries. ie. a pseudo and symbolic interpretatino to religion, that lacks coherence. Thus even though a lot of people started revisiting temples in the post Colonial era, its always been more as a 'pride' rather than real connectedness with the spiritual way of life. Peope do rituals to fulfil family obligations etc It all becomes a rital and nothing more. No connectivity.

The temples in Sri Lanka look more organised and pious partly because of the influence of Arumuga Navalar. During the Colonial era, the 'Hindu' identity was formed in a manner different to that in the Madras Presidency. Sri Lanka was more riled up agains't the destructiveness of the Portuguese rather than the social engineering of the Evengelists, even though the latter heaviliy influenced the Sri Lankan mind a lot later. But by that time, the new 'Hindu' identity has had time to formulate to an extend that the people cared a lot more about the physical attributes of temples a lot better.

Well, back to the presense and plain language.. so how can any govt. instill a sense of conectivity between the temple and community when the people themselves visit temple for more symbolic reasons ? ie. to break coconuts, to chant a mantra or to simply to be superstitious ?

Change in attitude need to come from the people. What the govt. can do is update the education system etc and put the illdoings of the past into perspective.

As for the neglect of temple architecture is concerned, I think that again has to do with the casual attitude of the people. Once peoplereally get interested in these we could possibly see more graduates takking an interest in temple architecture, management etc. Why are not temple architecture not discussed in depth in universities ? How many lengthy books have been written about temple management in India ? The people need to take hte first step. The govt. cant force these things.

Last edited by Fusionist; June 12th, 2010 at 03:24 PM.
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Old June 12th, 2010, 03:52 PM   #125
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^nice post
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old June 13th, 2010, 05:00 PM   #126
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Temple from Rajendra Chola's time in Kozhamandhal village (Kanchipuram district). Patched up with what looks like cement.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/avanibhajana/1421655707/
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old June 15th, 2010, 08:38 AM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusionist View Post
Well I will agree with you in principle that temple maintainance in the South definitely needs to improve.
Temples all across India are in pretty bad shape, but I think South India has far more surviving temple structures than the North/East/West. This is partly due to greater cultural continuities and fewer invasions from alien cultures throughout history.
I'm pretty sure that there are more historical temples in a single district in Kerala than the whole of Uttar Pradesh, for example.
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker

Last edited by Marathaman; June 16th, 2010 at 04:01 PM.
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Old June 17th, 2010, 02:52 PM   #128
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A couple of abandoned structures in Vellore:




http://www.flickr.com/search/?s=rec&...&m=text#page=2
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old June 21st, 2010, 09:11 PM   #129
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Reg. this thread

In a country where we have too many social, economic and political problems, it is no wonder that most temples are neglected. In an age where Bhakti and/or religious duties and customs are fading, this is expected. Moreover, in ancient India, kings felt that it was their duty to patronize religion, temples, arts etc. and spent lots of money on them. This is not the case anymore.

Except for temples that generate lots of income like Thirupathi, Pazhani etc., most temples are let to rot and the Govt is barely able to spend money for them.

In TN, historically during DMK's rule, temples will be allowed to rot. During AIADMK's rule with the religious Amma as the CM, temples galore (at least better than the DMK rule if not absolute).
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Old July 10th, 2010, 05:47 PM   #130
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Mel Pappambadi (near Thiru'malai), TN

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


http://www.flickr.com/photos/3543085...7613868244429/
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old July 16th, 2010, 11:25 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusionist View Post
Well I will agree with you in principle that temple maintainance in the South definitely needs to improve. I think the core problem lies in the way the Madras Presidency was run, as opposed to Bengal or Bombay.

The Madras Presidency was heavily reliant on missionaries, and infact attributed several administrative duties directly to missionaries like Salvation Army who instilled a sense of alienation amongst the local about thier own culture. The revival of the 'Hindu' activism in the post-missionary era in India again is heavily influenced by the system adopted by the western missionaries. ie. a pseudo and symbolic interpretatino to religion, that lacks coherence. Thus even though a lot of people started revisiting temples in the post Colonial era, its always been more as a 'pride' rather than real connectedness with the spiritual way of life. Peope do rituals to fulfil family obligations etc It all becomes a rital and nothing more. No connectivity.

The temples in Sri Lanka look more organised and pious partly because of the influence of Arumuga Navalar. During the Colonial era, the 'Hindu' identity was formed in a manner different to that in the Madras Presidency. Sri Lanka was more riled up agains't the destructiveness of the Portuguese rather than the social engineering of the Evengelists, even though the latter heaviliy influenced the Sri Lankan mind a lot later. But by that time, the new 'Hindu' identity has had time to formulate to an extend that the people cared a lot more about the physical attributes of temples a lot better.

Well, back to the presense and plain language.. so how can any govt. instill a sense of conectivity between the temple and community when the people themselves visit temple for more symbolic reasons ? ie. to break coconuts, to chant a mantra or to simply to be superstitious ?

Change in attitude need to come from the people. What the govt. can do is update the education system etc and put the illdoings of the past into perspective.

As for the neglect of temple architecture is concerned, I think that again has to do with the casual attitude of the people. Once peoplereally get interested in these we could possibly see more graduates takking an interest in temple architecture, management etc. Why are not temple architecture not discussed in depth in universities ? How many lengthy books have been written about temple management in India ? The people need to take hte first step. The govt. cant force these things.
During the times of the kings, it was a religious duty to construct and maintain temples with all the traditional splendor. That was a time when religion was part of the Govt, its administration. In other words, that was not a 'secular' period (a term coined by politicians and media in India and used in any context).

Then with the influx of Islam and Christianity into India in a big way, time was mostly spent to preserving the religion and protecting the icons of the religion like temples from infidels.

Right now, we are living in different times. There is less time for the urban people to spend time on religion. People from villages are migrating to join the urban crowd. Bhakthi is mostly confined to religious books and is the genre of the retired people who have more time than the working ones. Also, worship has business - right from the footwear token outside the temple to the archana and seva tickets inside the temple. There are many who can't wait in lines and so pay the price for costly tickets and finish off their 'dharshan' only to come after a year (annual pilgrimage). Added to these, the corrupt people who run the temple administration make sure that people don't look around and complain. They cover up everything and at the end of the day...all you see of these temples are the pics posted in flickr and picasa with friends and family of the people who are visiting those temples. Added to these, religion was also a means of time-pass in those days where people used to spend several hours of the day doing pujas, temple decoration etc. Now, we have TV, Internet etc. Now with this being the current situation, we can only expect temple maintenance to be the last priority on the Govt's list (especially the temples that don't have any form of income). I think many of the deserted temples whose pics have been posted in this thread won't exist in a couple of generations from now.

My apologizes to anyone who may find some of the content of the previous paragraph as offensive.

Last edited by ChennaiIndian; July 16th, 2010 at 11:33 PM.
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Old July 17th, 2010, 12:32 AM   #132
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The point is that we should protect the temples as they are our heritage. Even if one is not religious they should appreciate the effort gone into making these temples. Most of these temples were created centuries ago and truly are architectural marvels. Some of the techniques used in temple building show how intelligent were the ancient engineers. And this is why they should no be left like that or mismanaged. Yes in a country like India this cannot be the fore most priority but that doesn't mean we ignore it all together. Especially painting temples in fluorescent colours should be prevented lol
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Old July 17th, 2010, 07:59 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simpliCITY View Post
For a Panoramic view of Thali Mahaganapathy Temple , Calicut, click Here
Thants not Maha-ganapathy, its, Mahadeva (shiva) temple!!

Marathaman, its worth watching but, you can see the 1000 years old temple murals degrading day by day!! sad condition though!!
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 05:04 PM   #134
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Thrikkavadoor temple in Kollam, Kerala


http://picasaweb.google.com/v.visakh/Kollam#
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“ The human lust for power and esteem, coupled with its vulnerability to self-deception and self-righteousness, makes that an invitation to a calamity, all the worse when the power is directed at a goal as quixotic as eradicating human self-interest.”

“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old July 27th, 2010, 07:10 PM   #135
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Damp walls, concrete additions, cheap paints....

http://picasaweb.google.com/arvind.v...rnapuriswarar#





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“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old August 4th, 2010, 08:32 AM   #136
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Decaying frescoes at Uma Maheshwari Koil, Konerirajapuram

copyright snonymouso@flickr







This temple also has the largest bronze Nataraja idol in the world:

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“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old August 14th, 2010, 12:36 PM   #137
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Ugly tin sheet structure @ Shujeendram Temple!!



Concrete structure @ Padmanabhaswami temple Trivandrum

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Old August 24th, 2010, 11:36 PM   #138
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1,200-year old temple restored to its original beauty

http://www.thehindu.com/arts/history...icle592155.ece

REACH Foundation, an NGO, behind this massive conservation effort
The change that has come over the 1,200-year old Kailasanathar temple at Uttaramerur, about 90 km from Chennai, is unbelievable. The temple, which was in total ruins, with dense vegetation growing over its vimana (the tower above the sanctum) and collapsed mantapas, looks as good as new today. The vimana has been restored to its original beauty, its broken stucco figurines re-created, the foundation's granite stones re-stitched and the fallen mantapas re-erected. REACH Foundation, a non-governmental organisation, was behind this massive restoration and conservation effort.

“There were many challenges in this restoration and conservation work,” said T. Satyamurthy, founder of the Foundation and former Superintending Archaeologist, Archaeological Survey of India, who led the efforts. He said: “We overcame the challenges. The vimana has been conserved and restored, using as much as possible international techniques. The front mantapa, which had completely collapsed, stands majestically again. The arthamantapa has been re-assembled. The entire structure has been water-tightened. Not a drop of water can enter it now.”

...
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Old August 26th, 2010, 09:51 AM   #139
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Borewell in Thanjavur temple irks devotees


HANJAVUR: A borewell being dug inside the premises of the famous Brahadeeswara Temple in Thanjavur at a time when the temple, declared as a world heritage site, is gearing up for its millennium celebrations has shocked a section of the devotees.

The devotees, who have apprehensions about the possible adverse impact the drilling could have on the temple structure, have demanded that the work be stopped immediately.

The borewell work commenced on Tuesday near the art gallery in the southern corridor, about 50 metres from the main structure. P Maniarasan, coordinator of the Thanjavur Big Temple Rights Retrieval Committee, said while the drilling would have adverse impact on the 1,000-year-old main structure, drawing of water would result in sub-surfa ce imbalance. The committee has pasted posters all over the city condemning the decision to dig a borewell.

While the district administration pleaded ignorance about the work, HR and CE officials said they went ahead with the work only after obtaining clearance from the ASI. An ASI official said clearance was given for digging the borewell only after careful consideration of all aspects including the impact on the temple structure.

"As per agama sastra' (traditional temple rules) water for pooja purposes should be drawn only from the temple premises. There was a well at the particular spot where a borewell is being dug which used to serve the purpose. However, in 1995 the water level in the well went down, necessitating a tube well. A borewell was dug at the spot in the same year. However, the water level went down further over the years, requiring deepening of the well,'' he said.

However, devotees contend that water from the temple tank located inside Sivaganga park adjacent to the temple could be used for the purpose. "Even if the temple authorities feel that water in the tank is impure, they can dig a borewell close to it,'' said M Senthamizhan, a writer.

Read more: Borewell in Thanjavur temple irks devotees - Chennai - City - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...#ixzz0xhEeEDcH
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“The foundation of individual rights is the assumption that people have wants and needs and are authorities on what those wants and needs are. If people's stated desires were just some kind of erasable inscription or reprogrammable brainwashing, any atrocity could be justified.”

Steven Pinker
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Old August 28th, 2010, 05:40 PM   #140
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One would expect this to gather more attention from UNESCO...
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