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Old July 25th, 2008, 04:06 AM   #141
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arriaca View Post
The chinese use the japanese system for high speed, this system was designed in the 80´s
Mainly we use German technology,here're the pics,thanks to the photographer oyzw
These tracks are expensive when building ,but the maintenance cost is much lower .
image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr
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Old July 25th, 2008, 03:06 PM   #142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinivan View Post
Wouldn't the problem be solved with something as easy as covering the stones with a simple net?
The japanese have already tried that and the outcome was that the cost of maintaining the infrastructure increase. Spain should have opted for the more expensive concrete trackbed, now they might not be able to run the trains att 350km/h only because of the flying stones.

Last edited by gincan; July 25th, 2008 at 03:49 PM.
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Old July 25th, 2008, 03:11 PM   #143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinivan View Post
Wouldn't the problem be solved with something as easy as covering the stones with a simple net?
The japanese use this in their oldest line, but this system is very expensive, a man must remove this net every two months.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clkgtr View Post
Mainly we use German technology,here're the pics,thanks to the photographer oyzw
These tracks are expensive when building ,but the maintenance cost is much lower .
image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr
I don´t know very well the rails in China, I saw in another thread the japanese system in chinese rails.

In Spain, for the new tunnels and large bridges is used the Rheda 2000, and in some stations and the new tunnel under Madrid (large narrow, no UIC) the Edilon System

Very nice photos, thanks
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Old July 26th, 2008, 01:02 AM   #144
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I think we are already at around the limit for conventional railways in terms of speed - 320 km/h (199mph) is the current maximum on the LGV East Line in France. I can't see that 350km/h will be sufficiently advantageous economically to counteract the greater costs of operating at the higher speed.
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Old July 26th, 2008, 11:41 AM   #145
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The main reason is to reduce travel time. And this is less to travel by plane for the same price.

The limit is no 320 or 350 km / h, the engineers don´t know this limit, and the Spanish engineers are working to resolve problems that appear to increase the speed
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Old July 26th, 2008, 02:57 PM   #146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chafford1 View Post
we are already at around the limit for conventional railways in terms of speed - 320 km/h (199mph)
More than half a century ago(if my memory served me correctly), there was exactly the same belief but with a different speed value (160kmph). Now trains run at twice that speed and more economically
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Old July 27th, 2008, 01:04 PM   #147
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Conventional rail (Spanish width Iberian)

Video from the construction of the underground station Sol




Quote:
Originally Posted by Viriato View Post
Confirmado por Fomento:


http://www.fomento.es/NR/rdonlyres/F...0/08052901.pdf

Algunas imágenes de la nota de prensa:











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Old July 27th, 2008, 01:07 PM   #148
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...

Quote:
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Unas fotos de las obras, elpais.es









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Old July 27th, 2008, 01:08 PM   #149
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More...

Quote:
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Alguna foto nueva de la estación de Sol:











madridiario.es
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Old July 27th, 2008, 01:10 PM   #150
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and the last

Quote:
Originally Posted by neuromancer View Post












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Old July 27th, 2008, 01:14 PM   #151
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New map of the rail network in Madrid. With the new tunnel under the city centre

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Old July 27th, 2008, 06:53 PM   #152
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The german system at the Cologne–Frankfurt line:




















Sonic absorber:

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Old July 27th, 2008, 10:12 PM   #153
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wonderfull video...very interesting....incredible how they could build such a huge satation without the rest of the people overground noticing a hint of it....
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Old July 28th, 2008, 03:25 PM   #154
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New locomotive for freight trains Renfe Serie 253

The first video is the test in the Pajares Port towing a train of thousand tons of weight

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALF View Post
Las pruebas que se estan llevando a cabo por Alcazar, Avila y Pajares, de miedo! happy:

Las de Pajares sublimes. Ya ha remolcado el pasado fin de semana 1.000 Tm bajo la lluvia con holgura.
Y este video con un tren de 621m y carril mojado...




Ahora os pongo un reportaje fotografico de la visita que nos hizo la semana pasada la 253.001 a Avila, en pruebas dinamicas entre Zarzalejo y Mingorria, como comentaban mas arriba, tambien con resultado satisfactorio.


Lunes, 12 de Mayo

La maquina con la composicion recien llegada de Leon


Repasemos la composicion de pruebas. Momento historico tambien, la japo con los coches convencionales.















Ahora, veamos detalles tecnicos de la locomotora, con toda la parafernalia del cableado y los equipos de medicion.
















Jueves, 15 de Mayo

En esa fecha nos visito a mediodia la 253.002 (la del video en pajares), que venia con la 252.040 desde Alcazar, en su camino hacia Leon y Asturias.
En Avila, intercambiaron las maquinas de apoyo.












Y para finalizar, detalle que seguia portando la 5240 xD


Horas mas tarde, la composicion de pruebas por nuestra zona, nos abandonaba camino de un merecido descanso en Madrid.


Bueno, espero que os haya gustado el reportaje de estas pruebas por tierras castellanas, para una de estas prometedoras locomotoras para mercancias.
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Old July 30th, 2008, 12:35 AM   #155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clkgtr View Post
Mainly we use German technology,here're the pics,thanks to the photographer oyzw
These tracks are expensive when building ,but the maintenance cost is much lower .
image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr
Why are the tracks layed on a concrete surface instead of stones?
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Old July 30th, 2008, 06:05 AM   #156
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oo man, please read a few post above the pictures....
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Old July 30th, 2008, 11:40 PM   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clkgtr View Post
Mainly we use German technology,here're the pics,thanks to the photographer oyzw
These tracks are expensive when building ,but the maintenance cost is much lower .
Why is that?

And at what speed does flying stones become a problem? TGV dont use a concrete surface as far as I know.
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Old July 31st, 2008, 03:46 AM   #158
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Flying stones can become a problem at 350km/h, in Spanish AVE trains.
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Old July 31st, 2008, 06:02 PM   #159
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Originally Posted by Wallaroo View Post
Why is that?

And at what speed does flying stones become a problem? TGV dont use a concrete surface as far as I know.
Actually,if the concrete track is not damaged,it does not need maintenance.
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Old November 1st, 2008, 04:30 PM   #160
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Rail transport in Spain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rail transport in Spain operates on four rail gauges and services are operated by a variety of private and public operators. The total route length in 2004 was 14,781 km (8,791 km electrified):[1]

broad gauge (1668 mm): 11,829 km (6,950 km electrified at 3 kV DC)
Metro de Madrid gauge (1445 mm) 281,780km (all electrified at 750 V and 1500 V DC)
standard gauge (1435 mm): 998 km (all electrified at 25 kV AC)
narrow gauge (1000 mm): 1,926 km (815 km electrified)
narrow gauge (914 mm): 28 km (all electrified)

Most railways are operated by RENFE; narrow-gauge lines are operated by FEVE and other carriers in individual autonomous communities. It is proposed to build or convert more standard-gauge lines, including some dual gauging of broad-gauge lines, especially where these lines link to adjacent countries.

History


Development

The first line to be built in the Peninsula was a short link from Barcelona to Mataró opened in 1848, although by that date a line was already working in Cuba - then part of the Spanish empire. It was not until laws were passed in the 1850s making railway investment more attractive to foreign capital, that railway building on a large scale began.

One major misfortune was the decision, taken at an early stage, that Spain's railways should be built to an unusual broad track gauge of 1674 mm (roughly 5 ft 6 in, or six Castilian feet). Some believe that the choice of gauge was influenced by Spain's hostility to neighbouring France during the 1850s: it was believed that making the Spanish railway network incompatible with that of France would hinder any French invasion. Other sources state that that decision was taken to allow bigger engines that could have enough power to climb the steep passes in the second most mountainous country of Europe. As a result, Portuguese railways were also built to a broad gauge (roughly the same, 1664 mm, but rounded to a Portuguese unit). Spain and Portugal have since rounded their gauge to 1668 mm.

During the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s the railway network was extensively damaged. Immediately after the war the Franco regime nationalized the broad gauge network, and in 1941 RENFE was formed. Narrow gauge lines were nationalized in the 1950s, later being grouped to form FEVE.

Following the decentralization of Spain after 1978, those narrow gauge lines which did not cross the limits of autonomous communities of Spain were taken out of the control of FEVE and transferred to the regional governments.

The Railway Sector Act of 2003 separated the management, maintenance and construction of rail infrastructure from train operation. The first activity is now the responsibility of a new public company, Administrador de Infrestructuras Ferroviarias (ADIF), while Renfe (full name: Renfe Operadora) owns the rolling-stock and remains responsible for the planning, marketing and operation of passenger and freight services (though no longer with a legal monopoly).

In 1992 a standard gauge high-speed rail line (AVE) was built between Madrid and Sevilla. In 2003 high-speed service was inaugurated on a new line from Madrid to Lérida and extended to Barcelona in 2008, the same year the lines from Madrid to Valladolid and from Córdoba to Málaga were inaugurated.

The Madrid-Barcelona line is being extended onwards via an international tunnel beneath the Pyrenees to Perpignan where it will link up with the French TGV high-speed system. Delays on the part of the French government in authorizing construction on its side of the border have held up Spanish plans to some extent, however. Further high-speed links are under construction from Seville to Cadiz, from Madrid to Valencia and to Lisbon. The Basque Y, also under construction, will link the three Basque cities.
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