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Old April 5th, 2011, 05:30 PM   #261
AlexisMD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EK413 View Post
They better not be damaged after 2 years in salt water!
I think that they are pressurized
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Old April 7th, 2011, 07:07 AM   #262
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Key moments in search for crashed Air France plane since 2009 accident
By The Associated Press
4 April 2011

Underwater robots have spotted part of the cabin, bodies and engines of an Air France plane on the Atlantic Ocean floor -- nearly two years after it crashed in 2009. Here are some key moments in the unprecedented and protracted search for wreckage:

June 1, 2009: Crash of Air France flight 447

June 6: First bodies and debris recovered, 680 miles northeast of Fernando de Noronha islands off Brazil's northeast coast.

June 10: First month-long undersea search begins to listen for signals from black box flight recorders.

June 27: Search for bodies called off.

July 1: Emergency beacons on aircraft's black boxes believed to stop transmitting.

July 10: First search for black boxes ends unsuccessfully.

July 27-August 17: Second undersea search, unsuccessful.

April-May, 2010: Third undersea search, unsuccessful.

March 25, 2011: Fourth undersea search effort begins.

April 4, 2011: Robots spot large piece of plane including bodies, engines, cabin.
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Old April 9th, 2011, 08:13 AM   #263
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My input

A lot has been said about the FBW system used on Airbus aircrafts. I think that no system is perfect and both Boeing and Airbus have had their fair share of incidents. There are clear advantages to using a FBW system, specifically as it relates to performance parameters and the flight envelope, minimization of pilot error. FBW is also lighter on the plane and easier to maintain compared to a conventional aircraft with mechanical systems.

However FBW has deficiencies that cannot be ignored. In the event of multiple system failures the controls can be severely compromised consequently inhibiting the ability of a pilot to get control of a failing aircraft. In these situations the flight envelope can become a problem because of its inability to enable pilots to fly outside of those performance limits. In mechanical law the controlling of the plane becomes extremely difficult and near impossible.
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Old April 12th, 2011, 09:09 PM   #264
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Air France Crash-Search Closer to ‘Black Boxes’ as Tail Is Found

Flight recorders that could reveal why an Air France plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009 killing 228 people are closer to being retrieved after a diving robot found the section of fuselage where they were mounted.

The tail from the Airbus SAS A330-200 jetliner has been discovered, Nelson Marinho, president of an association for families of the crash victims, said today in a phone interview from Paris after meeting yesterday with Jean-Paul Troadec, director of the BEA, France’s air-accident investigator.

The recorders themselves haven’t yet been found, BEA spokeswoman Martine Del Bono said today. Known as black boxes, the devices store detailed technical information and records of cockpit conversations and are designed to survive heavy impacts.

Debris from Air France Flight 447 was located at a depth of 3,900 meters (12,800 feet) earlier this month after a fourth search attempt. The A330 went down on June 1, 2009, after departing Rio de Janeiro for Paris Charles de Gaulle airport.

Another search vessel will leave Senegal on April 21 to head for the site, French Transport Minister Thierry Mariani said yesterday in a statement. Attempts will also be made to recover bodies that have been sighted with the wreckage.

The discovery of the A330 fragments renews hopes that the cause of the crash will be found, Air France-KLM (AF) Group Chief Executive Officer Pierre-Henri Gourgeon said on April 3. Both Air France and Airbus have been charged with manslaughter over the accident, the worst in the Paris-based carrier’s history.
Speed Sensors

The BEA has said a contributing factor may have been the icing up of speed sensors, or Pitot tubes, causing unreliable readings. The agency made the suggestion after reviewing data transmitted in the last minutes before the crash.

At least 13,000 photos have been taken of the debris zone, which includes an engine, the fuselage and pieces of wing and landing gear. None of the images gives an initial explanation of why the A330 fell from the sky, according to BEA chief investigator Alain Bouillard, who will lead the recovery effort.

The wreckage is spread over a flat and sandy zone north of the plane’s last known position, Troadec has said. Recorders of the type used on the A330 have never spent so long at depth, he said, raising uncertainty that they will still be readable.
747 Recovery

Other black boxes found more than a year after an accident have yielded information. In the case of a South African Airways Boeing Co. 747 that crashed in the Indian Ocean in 1987, a deep- water recovery team found the voice recorder in 16,000 feet of water more than a year later.

Air France CEO Gourgeon said last month there’s no evidence that the crash was caused by the Pitot tubes, which were made by Thales SA. (HO) Bouillard also said last year that speed-sensor failure couldn’t alone explain the crash, and that aviation records in Europe and the U.S. document dozens of incidents where the probes failed and pilots retained control.

Air France shares close 2 percent higher at 11.56 euros today, paring declines this year to 15 percent. Airbus parent European Aeronautic, Defence & Space Co. fell 1.1 percent to 20.66 euros and has advanced 18 percent so far in 2011.

To contact the reporters on this story: Arnaldo Galvao in Brasilia at [email protected]; Andrea Rothman in Paris at [email protected]

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Benedikt Kammel at [email protected]

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-0...-is-found.html
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Old May 2nd, 2011, 09:46 AM   #265
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he flight data recorder from the wreckage of Air France 447 has finally been recovered, almost two years after the plane went down.
The cylindrical Honeywell ruggedised Flight Recorder stores data from the plane's many systems, but does not record cockpit conversations — that's the job of the 'black box', which has not yet been found.
It's not yet known whether any data has survived on the flight recorder, which has been submerged at extremely high water pressures 12,800 feet deep for 23 months.
However, a spokesperson for France's air safety investigator, BEA, said there was a good chance the unit would retain retrievable data, given it is designed to withstand the forces of plane crashes.

The maker of the recorder, Honeywell, told Bloomberg that the units were designed to withstand water pressures of up to 20,000 feet for 30 days, as well as impacts 1,500 times the force of gravity.

BEA's Martine Del Bono said the investigators had been focusing on retrieving flight data recorders, and then they would start lifting bodies to the surface.
The analysis of the wreckage is vitally important for airlines and their passengers worldwide, as the aircraft that went down — the Airbus A330 — is a commonly flown plane all over the world.
It is used within Australia — mainly on longer East to West coast routes — by Qantas and Virgin Blue, and to Singapore by Jetstar, as well as around the world by many international airlines on which Australians travel.
So far, the preliminary explanation that air speed sensors on the plane failed due to iced-up pitot tubes is merely a theory based on a sequence of messages the plane automatically radioed back to base seconds before crashing.

If information can be retrieved from the flight data recorder, airlines and travellers will be able to get a more complete picture of why this particular plane crashed — and reassure themselves about the safety of flying on Airbus planes in the future.

http://www.ausbt.com.au/flight-data-...47-crash-found
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Old May 2nd, 2011, 02:24 PM   #266
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let's hope they can read it
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Old May 2nd, 2011, 06:33 PM   #267
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Aljazeera is reporting that they will send it to Paris to analysis in 8-10 days. Basically, they are tying to see if they find the CVR too so they can send them together. The FDR looks (at least externally) to be in pretty good shape so one can hope they can recover data...unless salt water has done some damage.
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Old May 3rd, 2011, 07:21 PM   #268
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CVR has been found : http://www.americanairlines.cl/seatm...archResults.do
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Old May 3rd, 2011, 08:13 PM   #269
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French investigators say they have recovered the second flight recorder from the Air France plane that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Brazil almost two years ago.

France's air accident investigation agency (BEA) said Monday that search teams scouring the seabed found the Cockpit Voice Recorder in good condition. Officials hope the audio recording of the final few minutes of the flight can help them determine exactly why the plane crashed.

French officials announced Sunday that an unmanned submarine had located and recovered the first flight data recorder, or "black box."

Air France Flight 447 plunged into the Atlantic in June 2009, not long after taking off from Rio de Janeiro for Paris. The disaster killed all 228 people on board.

The plane was flying in a storm, but the exact cause of the crash has not been determined.

Experts speculate that icing on external speed sensors gave the pilots incorrect readings.

In March, a French judge placed the European aircraft maker Airbus under investigation for possible involuntary manslaughter charges in the 2009 crash.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/...121149184.html
http://www.bea.aero/fr

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Old May 3rd, 2011, 10:37 PM   #270
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It's amazing how well the FDR and CVR memory units were preserved, the fact it hasn't endured fuel fire means they are most likely to be intact. The units are designed to withstand much higher pressure than the water pressure at the depth where they were found.
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Old May 4th, 2011, 08:38 AM   #271
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
It's amazing how well the FDR and CVR memory units were preserved, the fact it hasn't endured fuel fire means they are most likely to be intact. The units are designed to withstand much higher pressure than the water pressure at the depth where they were found.
I guess it will also depend if the boxes had a crack to allow for sea water to leak in...and possibly cause any damage.
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Old May 16th, 2011, 05:46 PM   #272
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From official BEA site ( Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses pour la sécurité de l’aviation civile ):

Quote:
16 May 2011 briefing



Following operations to open, extract, clean and dry the memory cards from the flight recorders, BEA Safety Investigators were able to download the data over the weekend.


These operations were filmed and recorded in their entirety. This was done in the presence of two German investigators from BFU, an American investigator from NTSB, two British investigators from AAIB and two Brazilian investigators from CENIPA, as well as an officer from the French judicial police and a court expert.

More here

So there will be answers, finally...
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Old May 24th, 2011, 11:09 AM   #273
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Black boxes indicate pilot error in Air France crash-WSJ

May 23 (Reuters) - Preliminary findings from the recorders of an Air France jet that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009 have found that the pilots became distracted with malfunctioning airspeed indicators and failed to properly manage other critical systems, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing people familiar with the matter.

The crew did not follow standard procedures to maintain air speed and keep the aircraft's nose level after the Airbus 330 encountered some turbulence and unexpectedly high icing at 35,000 feet, the paper said.

Air France and Airbus were unavailable for comment outside business hours.

The Journal said the cockpit recorders show that the pilots apparently became confused by the alarms blaring from their instruments and despite trying to systematically respond to each warning, were unable to sort out the chaos and maintain a steady course.

The findings from the recorders, which are to be released on Friday, are expected to show that the twin-engine jet slowed dangerously after the autopilot disengaged.

The crash killed all 228 people on board Flight 447, which was on a scheduled flight from Rio de Janeiro to Paris.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 06:56 AM   #274
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Faulty readings, no captain in cockpit at start of emergency in 2009 Air France crash
27 May 2011

PARIS (AP) - Confronted with faulty instrument readings and alarms going off in the cockpit, the pilots of an Air France jetliner struggled to tame the aircraft as it went into an aerodynamic stall, rolled, and finally plunged 38,000 feet into the Atlantic Ocean in just 3 1/2 minutes.

But the passengers on that doomed Rio de Janeiro-to-Paris flight were probably asleep or nodding off and didn't realize what was going on as the aircraft fell nose-up toward the sea, the director of the French accident investigating bureau said after releasing preliminary black-box data on the June 1, 2009, disaster.

All 228 people aboard the Airbus A330 died.

The brief, highly technical report by the BEA contains only selective remarks from the cockpit recorder, offers no analysis and assigns no blame. It also does not answer the key question: What caused the crash?

But several experts familiar with the report said the co-pilot at the controls, at 32 the youngest of the three-man cockpit crew, Cedric Bonin, may have responded incorrectly to the emergency by pointing the nose upward, perhaps because he was confused by the incorrect readings.

The plane's external speed sensors, called Pitot tubes, have long been considered a likely culprit in the disaster, with experts suggesting they may have been iced over. And the BEA investigators found that two sets of instruments on the plane gave different speed readings, with the discrepancies lasting less than a minute.

Since the accident, Air France has replaced the speed monitors on all its Airbus A330 and A340 aircraft.

An official at Airbus said the aircraft's nose should have been pointed slightly downward to enable the plane to regain lift after it had gone into an aerodynamic stall.

"This is part of the general pilot training for any aircraft," said the official. He was not authorized to speak on that subject and asked not to be identified by name.

Other aviation experts concurred. In an aerodynamic stall, a plane most often loses lift because it is traveling too slowly, and begins to fall out of the sky. Pointing the nose downward enables the aircraft to pick up speed, gain lift and pull out of the stall.

Pulling the nose up is "an inappropriate way to respond" to an aerodynamic stall, said Paul Hayes, director of air safety for aviation consulting firm Ascend Worldwide Ltd. "He either misidentified what was happening or became confused."

He cautioned that Friday's report was brief and that it was still unclear how the series of events started.

The flight data recorder and cockpit recorder were dredged from the ocean in early May, along with some bodies.

They showed, in addition to inconsistent speed readings, two co-pilots working methodically to right the plane manually after autopilot stopped. Captain Marc Dubois returned from a routine rest to the cockpit amid what moments later became an irretrievably catastrophic situation.

After the plane went into a stall, warnings sounded, the autopilot and autothrust shut off as designed, and the co-pilot not at the controls "tried several times to call the captain back," the BEA report said. The captain returned one minute and 10 seconds later, when the plane had climbed to 38,000 feet.

"During the following seconds, all of the recorded speeds became invalid and the stall warning stopped," the report said, but added that the plane never came out of its aerodynamic stall.

"The airplane was subject to roll oscillations that sometimes reached 40 degrees," the report said. The engines never stopped operating and "always responded to crew commands," the BEA said.

"The pilots never panicked," BEA director Jean-Paul Troadec said on RTL radio, adding that they maintained professionalism throughout.

The passengers, he suggested, probably fell to their deaths without knowing they were doomed.

Dinner had been served and "you can imagine that most passengers were already asleep or nodding off," Troadec said. He said the cabin crew never contacted the cockpit to see what might be wrong.

"It seems they didn't feel more movements and turbulence than you generally feel in storms, so we think that till impact they did not realize the situation," said Jean-Baptiste Audousset, president of a victims' solidarity association, "which for the family is what they want to hear, they did not suffer."

He was among a group of representatives of families who met with BEA officials to be briefed on their findings.

At least one expert disagreed with the theory of a soft descent.

Data from the flight recorders shows the plane was falling almost 11,000 feet per minute (124 mph, or 200 kilometers per hour), its nose slightly tilted upward.

"Eleven-thousand feet a minute is a huge rate of descent," said Ronan Hubert, who runs the Aircraft Crashes Record Office in Geneva. "I would say some of the people on board would have lost consciousness."

The crew had feared turbulence, and more than eight minutes before the crash the co-pilot at the controls advised the cabin crew "you should watch out" for turbulence ahead. He said the plane could not climb out of the cloud layer where the turbulence was happening because it was not cold enough.

Turbulence caused the pilots to make a slight change of course, but was not excessive as the plane tried to pass through the clouds.

Four minutes later, the plane's autopilot and autothrust shut off, the stall alarm sounded twice and the co-pilot at the controls took over manual control. A second co-pilot, David Robert, 37, was also in the cockpit.

Pilots on long-haul flights often take turns resting to remain alert. After Dubois returned to the cockpit, he did not take back the controls.

Just over two minutes before the crash, Bonin is heard to say, "I don't have any more indications." Robert says: "We have no valid indications."

Michael Barr, who teaches aviation safety at the University of Southern California, said the atmosphere in the darkened cockpit would have been chaotic: lights flashing, loud alarms, frequent messages.

He compared the pilots to emergency-room doctors struggling with a sudden influx of seriously injured patients: They were bombarded with problems that they had to quickly prioritize.

On top of that, they were completely dependent on the information the plane's computers gave them.

"You have to rely on your instruments," Barr said. "That's why when the instruments aren't telling you the truth, you have a hard time deciding what to do. Which ones are right and which ones are wrong?"

Air France said in a statement that, based on the report, it appears "the initial problem was the failure of the speed probes which led to the disconnection of the autopilot" and loss of pilot protection systems.

The airline defended the captain, saying he "quickly interrupted his rest period to regain the cockpit."

Independent aviation analyst Chris Yates said the report appears "to raise more questions than it answers."

"It would seem to me, reading between the lines, that the cockpit crew weren't confident of the information that was being presented to them on the data displays," Yates said. "Maybe -- and it's only a maybe -- they took some action that led to the stall warning, and the plane stalling and then being unable to correct it."

A new, but not final, report with some analysis is to be issued in July.

------

Cecile Brisson and Frank Jordans and APTN in Paris, Joan Lowy in Washington and David Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report.
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Old May 30th, 2011, 04:16 AM   #275
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Its been awhile now for the black boxes to be found and the information retrieved. At least the families know what happen to their loved ones before they died. May they rest in peace now.
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Old May 30th, 2011, 05:29 AM   #276
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Quite remarkable that the data could still be extracted after so many months in deep waters.
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Old May 31st, 2011, 04:45 PM   #277
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REPORT: at least 75 bodies were recovered from the crashed air france flight 447 according to reports most of the victims were found inside the wreckage of the crashed AF 447 but authorities say that it will still take time to identify the victims.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 04:53 AM   #278
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Experts call for better training in wake of '09 crash
Air France pilots made mistakes when warnings sounded, investigators say

31 May 2011
USA Today

As Air France Flight 447 plunged in the darkness two years ago, its pilots had ample opportunities to save the jet. Instead, as has happened repeatedly on airliners around the world, they exacerbated the problem, according to preliminary information released by French investigators.

The Air France disaster, which killed 228 people on their way from Brazil to France on June 1, 2009, is the latest example and one of the most deadly of the biggest killer in aviation: a plane going out of control.

The latest information in the Air France case, released Friday by French investigators, is spurring renewed calls for better pilot training and other measures.

"If this was a technical problem (with the jet), we'd be saying we need to fix this," says John Cox, a former airline pilot and safety consultant who has written on loss of control for the British Royal Aeronautical Society. "There have been those of us in the industry that have been arguing for this for decades."

What is needed is better training so pilots are not as startled and confused during emergencies, and better tools to warn them when their planes are about to go out of control, the experts say.

Plummet from the sky

The French government's preliminary report describes what happened:

The Air France jet's 7-mile plunge into the Atlantic Ocean began suddenly when the jet's instruments went haywire. Ice had blocked the jet's speed sensors; the pilots could not tell how fast they were going. Warnings and alerts sounded almost simultaneously.

In response, the pilots made a series of mistakes, according to the French Bureau d'Enqutes et d'Analyses, the agency that investigates aviation accidents.

Instead of flying level while they diagnosed the problem, one of the pilots climbed steeply, which caused a loss of speed. Then the aggressive nose-up pitch of the plane and the slower speed caused air to stop flowing smoothly over the wings, triggering a loss of lift and a rapid descent.

They had entered an aerodynamic stall which has nothing to do with the engines, which operated normally meaning the wings could no longer keep the plane aloft. Once a plane is stalled, the correct response is to lower the nose and increase speed.

For nearly the entire 3 minutes before they crashed into the ocean, the pilots did the opposite, holding the Airbus A330's joystick back to lift the nose.

Although the response was improper, it would be wrong to simply blame the pilots without looking at how well they were prepared for the emergency and whether the information they received could have confused them, says Michael Barr, an instructor at the University of Southern California's Aviation Safety and Security Program. "They're sitting there happy, the autopilot is on," Barr says. "Next thing you know, lights are flashing, warning horns are on. There were probably 10 warnings or messages coming to the crew at the same time."

Similar miscalculations and miscues have been common in fatal accidents:

In the Colgan Air crash Feb. 12, 2009, near Buffalo that killed 50 people, the captain overreacted to a warning that the Bombardier Q400 turboprop had gotten too slow and yanked the nose of the plane upward, the National Transportation Safety Board found. If he had pushed the nose down, the board said, he might have saved the plane.

On Aug. 16, 2005, a West Caribbean AirwaysBoeing MD-82 crashed in Venezuela, killing all 160 people aboard, after the jet stalled at 33,000 feet. The Venezuelan government blamed the pilots for failing to recognize that they were in a stall during a 3-minute plunge, despite alerts from the automatic stall warning system.

On Oct. 14, 2004, a Pinnacle Airlines jet crashed near Jefferson City, Mo., after the pilots stalled the Bombardier CRJ-200 at a high altitude, the NTSB found. Both pilots died; no passengers were aboard.

Similar accidents killed 1,848 people in the 10 years ending in 2009, according to jet manufacturer Boeing.

Limitations of human brain

It may not be possible to prevent all such accidents.

Corporate pilot Patrick Veillette, who is writing a paper on the subject for the International Society of Air Safety Investigators, says there is evidence to suggest that the human brain cannot grasp what is going on in the most severe emergencies.

Still, Cox and others say stall training has been lacking for decades.

Newer flight simulators can better teach airline pilots how planes respond in stalls, and their use should be dramatically increased, they say.

Responding in part to the Buffalo crash, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has proposed improving pilot training.

"If we're going to make sizable improvements in aviation safety, we need to deal with upset recovery," Cox says. "That's where the risk is."
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Old August 10th, 2011, 08:23 PM   #279
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How pilots wrestled in vain to save Air France jet
Sat, Jul 30, 2011

PARIS (Reuters) - "What do you think? What do you think? What should we do?"

The 37-year-old Air France co-pilot with over 6,000 flying hours was running out of ideas as a stall alarm bellowed through the Airbus cockpit for the sixth time in exactly two minutes.

His junior colleague with two years on the job was already in despair as he battled to control the jet's speed and prevent it rocking left to right in pitch darkness over the Atlantic, on only his second Rio de Janeiro-Paris trip as an A330 pilot.

"I don't have control of the plane. I don't have control of the plane at all," the younger pilot, 32, said.

The captain was not present and it was proving hard to get him back to the cockpit, where his more than 11,000 hours of flying experience were badly needed.

"So is he coming?" the senior co-pilot muttered, according to a transcript released on Friday. Light expletives were edited out of the text here and elsewhere, according to people familiar with the probe into the mid-Atlantic crash on June 1, 2009.

The 58-year-old captain and former demonstration pilot had left 10 minutes earlier for a routine rest. In his absence the plane had begun falling at more than 200 km (125 miles) an hour.

"Hey what are you --," he said on entering the cockpit.

"What's happening? I don't know, I don't know what's happening," replied the senior co-pilot, sitting on the left.

With the benefit of black boxes hauled up 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) from the ocean floor just two months ago, investigators now say the aircraft had stopped flying properly and entered a hazardous stall, as its 3,900 square feet (362 sq meters) of wings gasped for air.

I'VE GOT A PROBLEM

The crew moved control sticks in every direction during their four-minute ordeal -- and sometimes contradicted each other as they tried to save the plane and its 228 passengers and crew.

At one point they could not decide whether they were climbing or falling after flying for minutes through a wall of ice particles that blocked the aircraft speed sensors.

In total the stall alarm went off 11 times -- the last of those only overridden by a new and even more ominous direction to "pull up" as the pilots ran out of time and space to recover.

Investigators say they are still baffled as to why the pilots ignored the triple alarm -- a synthetic "stall, stall" voice, a noise like crickets and a red warning light.

They appear to be working on the theory that the pilots recovered clumsily from one problem to do with icing, only to lurch into another one -- a stall -- that proved their doom.

Air France disputes this and says instruments went haywire.

GIVE ME CONTROL

The solution to a stall is to lower the nose to grab air.

Instead the junior pilot yanked back, thinking the plane was going too fast. Pulling up reduces speed. "I've got a problem I don't have vertical speed. I don't have any indication."

From behind, the captain was first to voice a dawning truth.

"I don't know but right now we're descending," he said.

Now the young pilot pushed forward and the stall receded.

His gesture lasted barely a second but may be pored over in courts for years as the aircraft's manufacturer Airbus will argue it shows the plane was responsive and able to recover. Air France says the plane overwhelmed properly trained pilots with a blizzard of confusing signals and misled them because of a "trap" caused by erratic warnings.

The crew have not been officially named.

As the plane hurtled lower, a pattern of professional directions started to fray, replaced by a rush of questions:

"What's the altitude?"

"What do you mean what altitude?"

"Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm descending right?"

The younger pilot appeared increasingly stressed and was subjected to some backseat driving -- yet he was left to fly.

(Captain) "Get your wings horizontal"

(First co-pilot) "Level your wings"

(Second co-pilot) "That's what I'm trying to do."

Flight 447 entered its final minute at 10,000 feet, having plummeted from 38,000.

"What the -- how is it we are going down like this?" asked the junior pilot.

"See what you can do with the commands up there, the primaries and so on," the senior co-pilot said.

By nine thousand feet, the situation must have been dire.

"Climb climb climb climb," ordered the senior co-pilot.

"But I have been pulling back on the stick all the way for a while," observed the younger pilot. In a stall, however, pilots point down to fix the stall first and only then climb to safety.

The captain interjected: "No, no, no, don't climb."

Senior co-pilot: "Ok give me control, give me control."

The plane was at 4,000 feet, its nose up quite sharply.

"Watch out you are pulling up," prodded the captain.

"Am I?" said the first co-pilot.

"Well you should, we are at 4,000," said the young pilot.

It is not possible to tell whether the crew finally alighted on what most experts call the right solution, but now they only had one choice, which was to think about avoiding water.

Both pilots pulled on their sticks as far as they could.

The computer spoke. "Sink rate. Pull up, pull up, pull up."

"Go on, the captain urged, "pull."

"We're pulling, pulling, pulling, pulling," said number 3.

The transcript showed the three men remained fully focused on trying to right the plane throughout the final four minutes. At no point did they discuss the possibility they and their passengers were about to die.

The last words that could be made out from the veteran captain were remarkably calm, reverting to cool-headed jargon.

"Ten degrees pitch," he appears to have said.

Less than half a second later, the recording stopped.
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Old October 14th, 2011, 10:02 AM   #280
NordikNerd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
How pilots wrestled in vain to save Air France jet
Sat, Jul 30, 2011

,.

The last words that could be made out from the veteran captain were remarkably calm, reverting to cool-headed jargon.

"Ten degrees pitch," he appears to have said.

Less than half a second later, the recording stopped.
are we ever going to hear that ? when can we listen to this recording on youtube ? I really want to hear it !!
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