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Old August 16th, 2009, 10:48 AM   #41
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Niedzica and Czorsztyn castles



Gothic route around Czorsztyn lake




Niedzica castle

The castle was an important centre of Polish-Hungarian relations since the 14th century. It was a place where the money lent by the Polish king to the Hungarian king Sigismund had to be returned following an agreement signed in 1412. Once the loan was paid back, the Polish king returned the 16 Spiš towns given to him by Sigismund as collateral. For centuries the castle was a border-post with Hungary. At the time of the Turkish invasion five hundred years ago, a deal was struck at Niedzica to make it a Polish protectorate.

The castle was built by a Hungarian known as Kokos from Brezovica with family rights dating back to 1325. In 1470 it became the property of the aristocratic Zápolya family. However, in 1528, the entire county including the castle was given away by John Zápolya aspiring to the Hungarian throne, and became the property of Viliam Drugeth who received it as a reward for his support. Sixty years later it became the property of Hieronim Łaski and his son Olbracht. At the end of the 16th century the castle was bought by Ján Horváth from Plaveč. The fortress was renovated many times in the fifteenth, sixteenth, eighteenth and in the beginning of the 19th century by its successive owners. The last Hungarian inhabitants remained there until in 1943 when the coming of the front in World War II inspired the Salomon family to abandon it. The last countess left with her children two years before the Red Army marched in. The final reconstruction of the castle was completed in 1963 under the supervision of the Polish Ministry of Culture. It has served as a historical museum ever since.

The legend

Before the Czorsztyn reservoir was built, the castle had a very Dracula-like setting, perched high on a wall above the Dunajec River. It was a place rich in tales and legends with some of the former residents resembling characters from gothic novels. In the post-World War II period Polish newspapers wrote at length about Sebastián Berzeviczy (one of Niedzica's owners) who traveled to the New World in the 18th century.

According to a popular legend, he fell in love with the alleged Inca princess. Their daughter Umina married the nephew of an Inca insurrection leader Túpac Amaru II, whose assumed name implied descent from Inca kings. Túpac Amaru was eventually executed by the Spaniards after rebelling against the colonial government. The legend goes on to claim that the sacred scrolls of the Incas had been handed down to his surviving family members. His nephew, Andrés Túpac Amaru a.k.a. Andreas with wife Umina and his father-in-law Sebastián Berzeviczy fled to Italy, where Andrés was killed in suspicious circumstances. Consequently, Umina with son and her father fled to Hungary and settled at the castle. Sources claim that Umina was assassinated there some time later. Her testament to son Anton, written in 1797 and stored there, allegedly contained information about the lost treasure of the Incas.There was a leaden case found at the castle with some “quipu” writings, but it was lost in Kraków in the following years. Later, news appeared about expeditions searching for fantastic treasures at Lake Titicaca in Peru. The notion that the Inca treasure map could be hidden somewhere in the depths of the castle is still cherished today.

Other tales follow the exploits of a motley crew of the castle's other former owners. They include stories of counts and jesters who tortured village folk, stabbed priests and misbehaved. The less grisly world of modern day Niedzica includes a pleasant restaurant just below the castle — a fine place for a break from the trek. Above the road, an 18th century wooden barn houses a charming museum of Spisz folklore.

Niedzica castle (Czorsztyn castle can be seen on the right side of the photo)

























Czorsztyn castle

The Czorsztyn castle was once a Polish border fortress.

The oldest parts of the castle come from XIII century.

First mentions about “castrum Wronyn” come from this period. The name “Czorsztyn” appears in the middle of XIV century. During the period of Polish king Casimir the Great (Kazimierz Wielki) circumferential walls were built and in the XV century the lower castle and a gateway. In the XVII century, Jan Baranowski, a starost, renovated the castle and added two new towers.

Thanks to its location along a historical trade route, the castle has a rich history.

It was visited by many famous people, including kings. Casimir the Great (Kazimierz Wielki), Louis of Hungary (Ludwik Węgierski), Jadwiga of Angevin (Królowa Jawiga), Ladislaus Jagiello (Władysław Jagiełło) (Zawisza the Black was a starost then ) and Ladislaus of Varna (Władysław Warneńczyk) stayed there. Hussites, John Casimir fleeing the Swedes, insurgents of Kostka Napierski, cossacks and confederates were seeking refuge here.

The castle was also a residence of fameous Polish knight Zawisza Czarny (Zawisza the Black), also known as The Black Knight. He was a winner of many tournaments, a symbol of a knight and a model of all knightly virtues. In 1410 he took part in the battle of Grunwald against the Teutonic Order.



Towards the end of the XVIII century, the castle was burnt after a lightning strike and fell into ruin. At the end of XIX century restoration works have started. They last until today, mostly thanks to the efforts of a present administrator of a castle, The Pieniny National Park.


Czorsztyn castle (Niedzica castle can be seen on the right)









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Old August 17th, 2009, 09:21 PM   #42
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Kazimierz Dolny and Janowiec castles


Kazimierz Dolny castle

Polish greatest medieval chronicler - Jan Dlugosz gives the information that the castle in Kazimierz Dolny was built by Polish king Kazimierz the Great in the 14h century. Its walls were the witnesses of many important events in the Polish history.

The 16th and 17th centuries were the town’s golden age. Being a crossroads of trade routes, it became very rich dealing in goods, especially corn. The beautiful granaries along the river bank commemorate this period together with the renaissance outlay of the town and the magnificently decorated tenement houses that belonged to rich merchant families (Przybyło, Celej, Górski). At that time Kazimierz already had 3 churches, out of which the most beautiful is the parish church (fara) that was renewed in the style of lubelski renaissance and in 1620, received the largest organ in Poland at that time. The Swedish invasion brought the decline of Kazimierz’s magnificence; the town was never to regain it again. After the fall of the January Uprising, Kazimierz lost its municipal rights and became a country settlement.

After World War I, Kazimierz became a haven for artists, mainly painters. In 1927 Kazimierz regained its municipal rights.













viem from castle on Kazimierz Dolny town






Kazimierz Dolny Tower

The tower was built in the middle Ages (11h - 12h century) and was most likely a part of the former castle.

view from castle on the tower







Janowiec castle

The Janowiec Castle was built for Mikolaj Firlej in 1507-1537.

Mikołaj Firlej was a Polish nobleman (szlachcic), hetman, diplomat, and expert of south-east Europe. Mikołaj became voivode of the Lublin Voivodeship in 1507, voivode of Sandomierz Voivodeship in 1514, Great Hetman of the Crown in 1515, and castellan of Kraków in 1520. He was several times envoy to the courts of Turkey and Hungary. He participated in the Jagiellonian-Habsburg congress at Vienna in 1515. He fought against Tatars in 1516–1519, 1519–1521 and 1523–1524 commanded the Polish cavalry during the war with the Teutonic Order.

Later that century the Italian architect Santi Gucci turned it into a manneristic residence combining features of both a castle and a palace. Later extensions and re-designs added Baroque and Rococo traits to the building's exterior and interiors. A Baroque chapel was erected in the courtyard in the mid-seventeenth century. Since the early years of the nineteenth century the Janowiec Castle started to deteriorate and before long fell into ruin. The innovatory restoration project embarked upon in 1988 envisaged leaving substantial parts of the Castle in permanent ruin.

Janowiec caslte seen from Kazimierz Dolny















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Old August 19th, 2009, 06:39 PM   #43
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Checiny castle







The Royal castle was built in XIII c. and some years later it became one of the main residences of the Polish king Wladyslaw Lokietek.

The castle was extended in the 15th century. It is split into two parts: the proper castle with two characteristic cylindrical stone towers and the lower castle.
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Old August 19th, 2009, 09:25 PM   #44
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These castles are very beautiful
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Old September 7th, 2009, 01:09 PM   #45
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Some castles from Mazovia region


Czersk

Czersk is a small township, 39 km from the center of Warsaw.

This medieval brick castle was built on a hill between 1398 and 1406 for the Mazovia Prince - Janusz I Starszy. It had three towers and curtains which were 8 meters high and almost 2 meters thick. Czersk became the capital of the Mazovian Duchy due to its significant settlement along the Vistula river. Queen Bona Sforza, among others, lived in the castle.

In the 15th century, however, the Vistula river shifted its bed, moving away from Czersk. As a consequence the site fell into obscurity and the castle began to decay.

During the Swedish invasion in 1655–1660 the castle was nearly destroyed. Briefly rebuilt in 17662–1766.

Today the castle ruins and the pituresque village have become tourist attractions. The towers were recently renovated and there is a fantastic view of the Vistula River valley from their terracess.
















Ciechanow

The Castle is Ciechanów’s most splendid monument and one of the most interesting examples of “defensive” architecture in Poland. Made of gothic-style brick, on stone fundaments and reinforcements, it is spaced out on the plan of a rectangle (48x57m) with a square yard inside. The construction of the castle began in 1344 under Siemowit II, was then continued by his son Siemowit III and finally finished by Janusz I. The castle was built by a curve of the river Łydynia on damp land. The original height of the castle walls did not exceed 5m. However, due to the damming up of local rivers for milling, the water level raised so much that it begun to flood the castle yard. The yard had to be therefore raised by 1,5m and the main gate, which was located between the castle’s towers – covered up with earth.

The gate was abandoned and another gate was built in the western wing – the new gate replaced an old side gate. The castle walls then turned out to be too low. The castle was therefore developed until its walls and towers reached their present height. The habitable part of the castle was located in its north wing, with a chapel in the northeastern corner. The castle’s best days were indisputably under queen Bona, who received it as a present from the king Sigismund the Old who adjoined Mazovia to his kingdom in 1526. Bona was a frequent visitor to the castle. Inspired by the fashion for Renaissance, she ordered the habitable wing to be rebuilt in this style. After she left Poland, the castle was left almost unattended and begun to fall into ruin, gradually loosing its former importance as a defense object. The Swedish invasions in 1657 and 1708 caused multiple damages and the Prussians contributed to its final ruining after the 3rd Partition of Poland. The habitable wing, which consisted of a representative brick building and a smaller wooden house, was pulled down. In the period between the two World Wars, the castle was gradually reconstructed and made accessible for tourists. The original rectangular outer wall (9,8m high) and two round towers: the south-eastern (prison) tower and the western tower called “the arsenal” (which served mainly for the purpose of defense as the crenellation and pitch tank seem to suggest). Traces of an old entrance are to be found between these towers – a long drawbridge used to join the castle with the town here. A stone commemorating the death of 4 soldiers of the Home Army, who were hanged on the 17th of December 1942, is located in the stone yard. The castle in Ciechanów was the source of inspiration for many writers and artists. It was visited and praised by: Zygmunt Krasiński, Hipolit Gawarecki, Stefan Żeromski, Bolesław Prus, Henryk Sienkiewicz, Maria Konopnicka.








Opinogora

Opinogóra Castle is located near to the Ciechanów in Masovian Voivodeship. Palace in Opinogóra; a small, very proportionate and nicely built in the neo-gothic style palace; given as a wedding present to the poet Sigmund Krasiński by his parents in 1843.

Probably designed by the French architect Eugene Emmanuel Viollet le Duc. A church with the mausoleum of the Krasiński family and the graves of Sigmund Krasiński and his mother Maria near the palace. Opinogóra Palace houses now The Museum of Romanticism.








Oporow

The castle in Oporów, a late-gothic defensive residence of knights, is one of medieval residences preserved in Poland. Raised in the second half of the fifteenth century by archbishop Władysław Oporowski, the castle constitutes large land properties belonging to the kin of the Oporowski family with Sulima as a coat of arms.

The building is surrounded by the scenic park dated from about 1840.










Liw

Driving from Warsaw in a direction of Drohiczyn, after 70 km you reach town called Liw. There on yhe river Liwiec embankment you may visit the ruins of defensive castle constructed by old Dukes of Mazowsze.

Castle was constructed in gothic style at the beginning of 14-th century on the layout of square, on the artificial hill.










Rawa Mazowiecka castle

The Rawa castle was the seat of dukes of Rawa who since the period of regional disintegration in Poland were outside Polish monarchs’ jurisdiction. After integration of Mazovia with the Crown, since 1563 the local stronghold was the place where “the Rawa treasure” was kept meant for so called levy army.

A huge octagonal tower, fragments of walls with galleries for guards and the outline of remaining parts of fortifications still can be seen. Exhibits of the Museum of Rawa Region featuring the history of the castle are on display in the castle.






Leczyca

Royal castle in Łęczyca was erected by Casimir III the Great during 1357-1370.

Later the castle served as a prison for the gentry, but for the whole period of its existence it has been officially recognized as the residence of Boruta Devil - a malicious prankster who has been accompanying the local community for generations.

Within the boundaries of the castle walls there is the Regional Museum where you can see some exhibits from the local excavations and also, with a little bit of luck, have an encounter with the ruler of the castle Boruta himself.





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Old October 14th, 2009, 01:48 AM   #46
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amazing thread. thanks

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Old November 14th, 2009, 06:10 PM   #47
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A few castles from south of the Little Poland region


Rytro castle

Rytro community has a history dating back many centuries. The oldest written document mentioning Rytro dates from April 17, 1312. In this document, Polish King Wladyslaw the Short gave the Saint Klara Sisters of Stary Sacz the right to collect custom fees on all trade passing on the Poprad, "prope castrum Ritter". Sucha Struga is first mentioned in documents in 1596 and Oblazy Ryterskie and Roztoka Ryterska in 1629.

Until 1770, this land was the personal property of the Polish king and was leased to loyal individuals as a reward for special services. It is thanks to the castle that Rytro is first mentioned. In this book, "Liber beneficarum" (1244), Jan Dlugosz, the famous Polish historian quotes the last will of Piotr Wydzga, a Sadecki Lord and castle owner in the first half of 13th century. He contends that the name "Rytro" comes from the German word "ritter" meaning knight. The oldest part of the castle is the main tower, to which was later added barracks and a triangular fortress wall,. This fortification belonged to the king, protected Poland from Hungarian forces and served as a custom point on the important land and water routes.

The 14th, 15th and early 16th centuries were the "Golden Age of Rytro". Many kings, with their entourages, passed here during this period. King Wladyslaw the Short traveled to Hungary and on to Rome for the century celebration in 1300. His daughter, Elizabeth, passed this way to become the wife of Karol Robert, King of Hungary. Her bother, the young Kazimierz the Great took this route to visit his brother-in-law in Hungary. In 1384, Queen Hedwig was met by her brother-in-law King Zygmunt at Rytro Castle itself.

During the reigns of Wladyslaw the Short and Kazimierz the Great, Rytro was mentioned many times in 14th century documents.

These are some of the significant ones: April 17, 1312 - The privilege given by Wladyslaw the Short to the Saint Klara Sisters. May 15, 1327 - The same king exempted traders from paying customs fees if they were taking part in the yearly St. Margaret's Day Celebration in Nowy Sacz. This act was later confirmed by Kazimierz the Great in 1356 and Zygmunt I in 1512. June 18, 1331 - After a great fire in Nowy Sacz, King Wladyslaw the Short gave inhabitants permission to use wood from forest behind Rytro Castle to rebuild the town, "silvam ultra Ritter castrum sitam". January 6, 1338 - King Kazimierz the Great exempted Krakow citizens from paying custom fees " in Ritter".

A colorful historical figure from Rytro is Peter of Rytro, of the House of Topor. He is mentioned by Jan Dlugosz in his: Annals and Chronicles of famous Polish Kingdom". During the period of King Wladyslaw Jagiello's Battles against the Teutonic Knights, Peter fought with Witold, The Great Prince of Lithuania (the king brother) at the attack on Dynenberg Castle, as well as in the Battles of Grunwald, Koronow and Bardiow. In 1418, he was given possession of Rytro Castle with the villages of Rytro, Przesietnica, Barcice, Olszana, Wolnica, Leszczyna, and Czarny Potok. He also received the title of "district governor". When the King and Royal Council gathered in Warta on Saint Nicholas Day in 1430, Vincent Kot of Debno (later Archbishop of Gniezno, Prime Bishop and Cardinal) and Knight Peter of Rytro were nominated to educate the king's sons.

Later centuries brought nothing interesting to Rytro. Trade continued, but custom fees were no longer collected. Tytro Castle is mentioned by Marcin Bielski in his chronicle "Women's Parliament" as old walls, dilapidated. We know that in 1657 Jerzy Rokaczy, Prince of Transulvania, attacked Sacz Province along this route and that by 1658 the castle was in ruins. In 1770, two years before the partition of Poland into Russian, Prussian and Austrian Sectors, Rytro was annexed by Austro-Hungarian Empire.

After World War I, when Poland was reinstated, Rytro become part of a group of communities administrated from Piwniczna. Since there were no longer borders separating the former sectors, Rytro became a popular summer resort. As an official health resort it was given permission to collect taxes, from 1924, many guest houses were established.

Many famous individuals have visited Rytro. At the end of 19th century Edward Lubicz Niezabitowski, professwor of Poznan University visited his father-in-law Fryderyk Schille (who was an ethnographer and at the time, director of Rytro Forest) and wrote abouth Rytro. Michal Balucki, The famous story-teller and comedy writer, visited Rytro many times during the years 1892 - 1901 and corresponded with the popular actor Vintent Rapacki mentioning that "Rytro's peacefullnes refreshed his spirit".

From June to August 1903, Ignacy Daszynski, a representative of the Socialist Party, stayed in miller J. Lachner's house. Jozef Pilsudski visited him there.

The wealth of the area was its forest. The Austrian Government was the owner until 1867. The Earl Lebiega owned these woods until 1908. For a short time Earl Potocki of Bobrownik near Tarnow was also the owner the Prussian company Lienerot purchased them from him. Earl Stadnicki bought this same forest during the Great War (1917). As a professional forester he sought to replenish the forests destroyed by Prussian firm. It's thanks to him that today we can enjoy the nature of Rytro. He created the Baniska Nature Reserve on his own land in 1924. There we can now admire the last remnants of the Carpathian Wilderness.

During World War II, the area crossed by courier trails (from Nowy sacz to Budapest) used by such partisans as the Home Army and Peasants Battalions.















Tropsztyn castle in Wytrzyszczka

Tropsztyn is the castle in Wytrzyszczka that was constructed on a rocky hill in the first half of the 14 th century. Today it has been completely restructured into one of the most stunning example of a stone castle in Poland.

While visiting you can walk along an underground trail that runs through the dungeons.













views from the castle





Czchów castle

Czchow is the home of the Czchow Castle ruins, which had been built at the turn of the 14 th century. Currently, it consists of a tower that stretches twenty meters into the air (tourists admitted), the foundations of walls, and living quarters.

Scroll--->







view from the tower

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Old December 23rd, 2009, 12:08 PM   #48
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Some more castles from Masovia and Lodzkie regions (Central Poland) :

Płock - the Mazovian Princes castle and the cathedral

Płock lies on the bank of the Vistula River, in the central part of Poland, about 120 km west of Warsaw. Płock was the capital of Masovia and for a short period at the end of the 11th century and the beginning of the 12th century it was a residence of Polish kings.

Płock has some fine monuments. The Cathedral of Our Lady was built in the 12th century in the Romanesque style and later reshaped in the Gothic and Renaissance styles. The fragments of the castle of the Mazovian Princes’ can also be seen. The museum in the castle features an Art Nouveau exhibition.







Pułtusk castle

Pułtusk is a town in Poland by the river Narew, 70 km north of Warsaw. It is located in the Masovian Voivodship and has about 19,000 inhabitants.

The town has existed since at least the 10th century. In the Middle Ages it was one of the most important castles defending northern Masovia against the attacks of Prussians and Lithuanians.

In the 16th century the castle was rebuilt by many famous Italian architects, including Giovanni Babtista of Venice and Bartolommeo Berrecci, and Giovanni Cini of Siena.

In April 21, 1703 during the Great Northern War, a decisive battle was fought in Pułtusk where the Swedish army under Charles XII defeated and captured a large part of the Saxon army under Graf von Steinau. Although the town and the castle were conquered by Polish forces under Marshal Wincenty Gosiewski, they were recaptured by the Swedish forces who looted and destroyed it.

Yet another Battle of Pułtusk was fought on December 26, 1806, between forces of Imperial Russia and Imperial France. The battle became so famous that its name is inscribed on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. After the fall of Warsaw in 1809 Pułtusk became the temporary capital of the Duchy of Warsaw. After the fall of Napoléon Bonaparte the town was annexed by Russia.

The town was also a battleground in the Polish-Soviet War of 1920, at the eve of the Battle of Warsaw.

Currently Pułtusk is one of the most picturesque towns of Masovia. Located at the Narew river, it is one of the most popular weekend places for inhabitants of Warsaw.









Iłża castle

Iłża is a small town in Masovian Voivodeship with the remains of the castle which was built in 1340 by bishop Jan Grot.







Szydłowiec castle

Szydłowiec is a town in Mazovian Voivodeship with 15,243 inhabitants.

From the 12th century the environs of Szydłowiec belonged to the powerful knightly family of Odrowąż. In the 13th century the site of the present castle was occupied by a stronghold on an artificial island with wood and earth defences and by a village called Szydłowiec.

The present town came into being in the early 15th century and together with the neighbourigh estate was the property of the Szydłowiecki and Radziwiłł families until the 19th century.

The town flourished in the 16th and the first half of 17th centuries. It was then an important centre of trade and crafts, mainry stone-masonry based on the exploatition of the local sandstone which was easy to work. This stone was used to carve architectural sculptural elements and to make tools for agriculture. It was also a building material for the local Saint Sigsmunt Church, Castle in Szydłowiec and the Town hall in Szydłowiec; moreover, it was sent to Kielce, Cracow and Warsaw.







Uniejów castle

Originally, a gothic defensive fortress which was later rebuilt as a Renaissance Bishop’s residence the castle includes a huge park with many exotic trees. Today it houses a hotel and a conference centre.





Drzewica castle ruins

Ruins of the late-Gothic and Renaissance castle (1527-35) erected by M.Drzewiecki, the Archbishop of Gniezno .

In the 18th century it belonged to the Sołtyk and Szaniawski families,
since the end of the 18th century the seat of Observant convent. After the fire in 1814 abandoned (the nuns moved to St Katarzyna convent), castle walls preserved till today.









Castle ruins in Bolesławiec



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Old January 16th, 2010, 04:11 PM   #49
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Wow, great photos, with great landscapes. I enjoyed every single one!!
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Old February 15th, 2010, 07:56 PM   #50
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Great work guys!
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Old February 15th, 2010, 10:43 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karasek
Opole: the castle was already destroyed in 1615 and turned into a Jesuit gymnasium. The adjoining Jesuit church was demolished in 1828 and a new gymnasium was built until 1830.
Karasek, you're talking about two different castles within the city, the upper castle has been given to the Society of Jesus by the Habsburg Monarchy in 1669 as gift, that has been meant as an action against the evangelical community in the city, that has owned the castle chapel since 1623.
DocentX has posted some captures and information about the piast castle, thus another castle lying in the city, that has been dismantled in 1928 according to the decision made by contemporary local government due to technical issues.

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Old February 16th, 2010, 12:12 AM   #52
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DocenX, thanks for this amazing thread. I'm looking at this pictures and I can't belive that our country has so many beatiful castles Thanks again, I'm really impressed.
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Old February 16th, 2010, 12:51 AM   #53
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What a fantastic collection of castles in Poland. Very impressive.
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Old February 16th, 2010, 02:58 AM   #54
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Great work guys!
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Old February 20th, 2010, 04:41 AM   #55
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Did you forget the awesome castle in Walbrzych, or did I somehow miss it?
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Old February 20th, 2010, 06:12 AM   #56
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I totally love Poland. Hope I can go there soon. Mexico loves Poland did you know that!

NASDRODIA from Mexico!!!
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Old February 24th, 2010, 12:11 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doggo View Post
Mexico loves Poland did you know that!
Is is because of John Paul II ?

BTW Some people says that Poland is a Mexico of Europe
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Old March 10th, 2010, 04:07 PM   #58
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Kliczków castle

The history of the castle is equally interesting as the history of the whole Silesia. Historical sources acknowledge the year 1297 as the year of erection of Kliczków castle. The castle, constructed by Bolko the Severe (Bolko I Surowy), the Prince of Świdnica and Jawor, was used as an earth and wooden border stronghold located on the high Kwisa bank.

In the 13th and 14th centuries Silesian principalities were losing their independence and the rights to strongholds were vested to knights families, who transferred them into castle and farm complexes.

The same happened to Kliczków stronghold, which became the property of a Saxon family of the Rechenbergs in 1391. Kliczków Wehrau estate remained their property for almost 300 years.

The most distinguished member of the family in terms of his merits for the castle was Kacper the Middle (ca. 1545 1588), who initiated the reconstruction of the castle into a Renaissance building, terminated by Kacper Junior, his son.

Kacper the Middle also funded an altar (1580) and a great wooden epitaph (1588) in the parish church of Saint Trinity in Kliczków. We know from a description coming from the 50s of the 17th century, preserved in the National Archive in Wrocław, that the palace was build of stone, it had two ballrooms (one of them on the first floor), 20 chambers, kitchen and chapel.

Kacper Junior built also the farm buildings (malt-house, brewery, stable, coachhouse). His strategic position (he had the titles of chamberlain and advisor on the Emperor's Court) may be well exemplified by a personal visit of Czech King Matthew to Kliczków in (1611).

The Thirty Years War brought about the change of the owner. In 1631, after a period of inheritance disputes, the property was taken over and the estate reconstructed by the von Schellendorf family and two generations later the lateral branch of the family, the von Frankenbergs. It was then, when the nature of southern façade was changed, interiors were modernised, Lions Gate was erected, baroque fountains were built on the courtyards and the character of the park was changed.

In 1747, the estate was purchased by the von Promnitz family, owners of landed estates in Pszczyna, Żary, Borowa and Nowogrodziec, and 20 years later Kliczków was taken over by count Hans Christian zu Solms-Baruth, who married the widowed countess von Promnitz.

Only the counts descendants started the bigger redevelopment of the castle. In 1810, the Ballroom received the Empire style decorations, and New Gothic Jenny Tower as well as mange were constructed. It was then, when the manorial farm buildings were moved outside the entrance gate.

In 1877, the estate was taken over upon a will by count Fryderyk Hermann Jan Jerzy zu Solms-Baruth. In 1881, upon his order, Berlin architects Henryk Kayser and Karol von Grossheim started a reconstruction of the estate that took four years to be finished. Tastes of that time made it possible for architects to get inspired by different styles: English gothic, Italian renaissance as well as German and French mannerism.

Visiting the estate, you will find these features on façades and in interiors, especially in the most beautiful Theatre Room. Eduard Petzold, creator of landscape parks widely known in Europe, designed an over eighty-hectare park in the English style.

In 1906, the Old Prince inherited the title of prince, he had the title of the highest Pallotine of the last emperor of Prussia, he was the chamberlain of imperial court and higher master of hunting. He was known as a devoted hunter, but also a protector of animals and specialist in horses. His son, count Fryderyk Hermann Christian Hans zu Solms-Baruth inherited his fathers property in 1920. Emperor Wilhelm II, his successor and the highest representatives of the court visited Kliczków several times taking part in hunting.

During the Second World War, after the unsuccessful attempt on Hitlers life, members of the family were arrested and the property was confiscated and taken away.











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Old March 13th, 2010, 02:26 PM   #59
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Moszna Castle:










History:

The castle in Moszna is one of the best known monuments in the western part of Upper Silesia. The history of this building begins in the half of the 17th century, although old cellars were found in the gardens during excavations which were carried out at the beginning of the 20th century. Some of the investigators, including H. Barthel, claimed that those cellars could have been remnants of a presumed Templar castle, but their theory has never been proved true. After World War II, further excavations discovered a medieval palisad.
The central part of the castle is an old baroque palace which was partially destroyed by fire on the night of June 2, 1896 and was reconstructed in the same year in its original form by Franz Hubert von Tiele-Winckler (the son of Hubert von Tiele-Winckler). The reconstruction works involved an extension of the residence. The eastern Neogothic-styled wing of the building was built by 1900, along with an adjacent orangery. In 1912-1914, the western wing was built in the Neorenaissance style. It can be noticed, that the architectural form of the castle contains a wide variety of styles, thus it can be generally defined as eclectic. The height of the building, as well as its numerous turrets and spires, give the impression of verticalism. The whole castle has exactly ninety-nine turrets. Inside, it contains 365 rooms with a total floorage of 7,000 sq.m. and a cubic capacity of about 65,000 m3.[3] The castle was twice visited by the German Emperor Wilhelm II. His participation in hunting during stay at the castle was documented in a hand-written chronicle in 1911 as well as in the following year.

The castle in Moszna was the residence of a Prussian family Tiele-Winckler, who were industrial magnates, since 1866 until the spring of 1945 when they were made to move to Germany and the castle's premises were occupied by the Red Army. The period of the Soviet residence left the major destruction to the castle's internal fittings in comparison with the very little damage caused by the preceding war.

After the war, the castle did not have its permanent owner and would be the seat of various institutions, until 1972 when it became a that-time convalescent home and is nowadays a Public Health Care Centre for Therapies of Neuroses. It can still be seen by tourists, however. Additionally, the castle has a chapel which is also used as a concert hall. Since 1998 the building houses a gallery, in which works of various artists are presented at regular exhibitions.

Apart from the castle itself, the entire complex includes a park which has no precised boundaries and combines with the nearby fields, meadows and a forest. Only the park's main axis can be characterised as geometrical. Starting from the gate, it leads along the oak and then horse-chestnut avenues, towards the palace. Further on, the park passes into an avenue of lime trees with symmetrical canals running along both sides of the path, lined with a few varieties of rhododendrons. The axis of the park is ended in the base of a former monument of Hubert von Tiele Winckler. On the eastern side of the lime avenue there is a pond with an islet referred to by the owners as the Easter Island. The islet is planted with needle-leaved shrubs and can be reached through a Chinese-styled bridge. The garden, being a part of the whole park complex, was restored slightly earlier than the castle itself. The preserved documents of 1868 inform that the improvement in the garden's aesthetic quality was taken care of by Hubert von Tiele Wickle
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Old March 24th, 2010, 02:39 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbur66 View Post
Did you forget the awesome castle in Walbrzych, or did I somehow miss it?
It's on the first page - look for the Książ castle
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