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Old April 8th, 2010, 11:38 PM   #61
spicytimothy
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8000 people on facebook is an impressive number, but hardly large enough to be indicative of public opinion on the matter. I challenge those people to stand at that bus terminal for an hour and try not to cover their noses and mouths. Although I never liked that terminal to begin with...

P.S. Is it possible to just move it directly underground instead of moving it somewhere else???
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Old May 26th, 2010, 08:45 PM   #62
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Old May 27th, 2010, 06:26 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Can someone please tell me why is route B1 on this sign? KMB route B1 serves Tin Shui Wai - Lok Ma Chau MTR Station, how on earth does it pass through TST?
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Old May 27th, 2010, 08:38 AM   #64
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Quote:
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I use this bus stop every day!
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Old December 20th, 2010, 05:39 AM   #65
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Activists fear costly mistake in bus move
6 December 2010
The Standard

Activists are hoping to repeat history in their attempt to save the 90-year-old Star Ferry bus terminus in Tsim Sha Tsui.

That consists of inundating the powers that be with letters from individuals, concern group Our Bus Terminal said.

It is collecting letters in five districts in Kowloon to show public support for the present location of the terminus, which is being moved to Tsim Sha Tsui East, a 15-minute walk from the pier.

At least five district councillors and two lawmakers, pan- democrats Frederick Fung Kin- kee and ``Long Hair'' Leung Kwok-hung, are supporting the campaign.

The government had planned to move the terminus years ago, suggesting it be replaced with a piazza to attract tourists.

It gazetted the proposal in June last year, but work was suspended after strong public opposition that included 5,100 people that the concern group convinced into putting names to petition letters.

But the government gazetted the proposal again in October.

``This time, we hope to collect 6,000 letters or more,'' group spokesman Jacky Lim Hung-tat said. By last night, the group was already halfway there.

Lim said many people are kept in the dark over the proposal.

Apart from conservation concerns, moving the terminus also means Star Ferry will see a drop in custom of more than 10 percent.

This would be a further blow for the ferry company since the relocation of the original Queen's Pier in Central.

In the worst-case scenario, Star Ferry will give up unprofitable routes, costing the public a cheap means of crossing the harbor.

``Even if it kept the routes, the location of the new terminus will be so inconvenient and difficult to access that people will not bother catching the ferry even though it is cheap,'' he said.

``It costs about HK$7 to get from Sham Shui Po to Hong Kong Island by bus and ferry, and HK$10.50 by the MTR.''

A Mrs Wong, said the terminus gives her and her 12-year- old son a convenient transport interchange.

``If you force people to spend extra time walking to the new terminus, they will be unhappy,'' she warned.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 10:33 AM   #66
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Activists out to stop buses move
The Standard
Monday, December 20, 2010

More than 11,000 people have signed a petition calling for the Tsim Sha Tsui Bus Terminus and transport interchange next to the Star Ferry Pier to be retained and preserved, a concern group says.

The signatures are almost double the number that organizer Our Bus Terminal expected.

In a study, the group proposes that a replacement site on Mody Road, built in 2007, should instead be used for tourist coaches.

The government plans to remove the bus terminus and replace it with a piazza to attract tourists.

Group chairman Leslie Chan Ka- long said that up to Saturday night, 11,400 people - including a few hundred tourists - signed a petition calling on the government not to relocate the terminus as this will mean an extra 15-minute walk for commuters.

The group set out to get 6,000 signatures, so the actual number shows strong public opinion not only to keep the interchange but also to preserve it, said group spokesman Jacky Lim Hung-tat.

The group hopes to hand the petition to Chief Executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen before tomorrow's Executive Council meeting.

Tsim Sha Tsui has only 33 coach parking spaces for 29 hotels, the group said, adding that 120 to 150 coaches will be there on average but that could rise to 230 in busier times.

The terminus in Mody Road can handle 25 coaches of different sizes, Chan said.

Our Bus Terminal argues that the proposed piazza will not work as tourists look for authentic sites to which local people have a sense of belonging instead of a place with no real connection such as Golden Bauhinia Square in Wan Chai.

KMB routes 28 and 234X, which are already using the new terminus, can return to their original terminal at Hankow Road, the group said.

Though the government has yet to announce the removal date of the bus terminus, on October 22 it gazetted turnaround works on Salisbury Road/Canton Road which, the group says, is advance work before the switch.
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Old December 29th, 2010, 02:28 PM   #67
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A Hong Kong star, fading in a new day
24 November 2010
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

One of the city's most recognizable icons, the Star Ferry appears in danger of eclipse. The ferry's days appear numbered, thanks to a vision for the future, that sees the waterfront as a place for public recreation. Guo Jiaxue reports.

If you saw the movie the World of Suzie Wong, you may remember the first meeting of the lovers: the beautiful Hong Kong girl stood at the railing of a ferry, savoring the sea breeze, gazing into the distance. She spoke - telling the man at her side her name was Mee Ling and that her father was wealthy.

The film not only brought millions of Western men to the mystery Pearl of the Orient in search of the iconic Asian girl, it also introduced to the world the city's storied Star Ferry. The half-white-half-green old-style boat is still perfectly functional, carrying busy local commuters and tourists from all over the world, who gaze in wonder at the city's legendary skyline. The 100-year-old ferry today is being slowly squeezed out of existence; ever challenged by urban planning and infrastructure development.

"Under the shadow of these, we might lose HK$10 million every year in coming years. Whether Star Ferry can survive will be under a big question mark."

The voice of Johnny Leung, General Manager of the Star Ferry Company, sounded bitter.

The ferry company has just announced that it will not continue operating its two routes from Hung Hom to Central and Wan Chai after the license on the routes expires at the end of next March. The company's losses on the two routes have been averaging HK$2 million annually. Franchise routes between Tsim Sha Tsui and Central and Wan Chai lost HK$4 million in 2009. The losses are expected to grow.

"We are sadly helpless. Things came to be this way, but Star Ferry has done nothing wrong."

Over the past decades, the shore that borders Victoria Harbour has been going through constant change. And the changes have accelerated in recent years. Leung pointed to a map revealing clearly how the new face of the harbour is pushing the Ferry away.

The first blow was dealt by land reclamation. The shoreline has encroached farther and farther into the harbour, swallowing up ferry piers and driving the ferries farther from the business areas.

What happened to the old Central Pier was a clear precedent. In 2006 the old pier moved to its current location. People stepping off the ferry today have to walk through a corridor hundreds of meters long, to reach the heart of Central and its towering office buildings.

"We lost a lot of regular passengers working at the Prince's Building, lawyers, partners ..." Leung said. The move caused a drop off in passenger traffic amounting to 18 percent. It got worse. By the end of 2008 the Star Ferry had lost a quarter of its business. That followed the merger of KCR with MTR and introduction of a series of Interchange Discounts. The decreased passenger flow also drove down rent for shops around the pier - another major source of income for the Star Ferry - by 20 percent.

Star Ferry is bracing to relive that nightmare. "I am afraid that the Wan Chai pier will be the Central pier all over again," Leung said.

After the Central-Wan Chai Bypass is completed in 2013, the current Wan Chai pier will have to move north by 130 meters to the new reclamation area, which appears likely to create a scenario quite similar to the 2006 move of the Central pier.

What's more, the modern view of harbour planning has set about to remove bus terminals from the habourfront.

The Harbour-front Enhancement Committee set up a few Harbour Planning Principles in 2006, emphasizing that the harbourfront should be used "for public enjoyment." The policy continued, "land required for and the impact from infrastructure developments, utility installations ... should be minimized". The principles also state that Victoria Harbour must integrate with the hinterland in a comprehensive manner ... "preferably at grade".

Under those principles, bus terminals with the noise they produce and the exhaust emissions became undesirable.

"The harbourfront site was too valuable to be used for a PTI (Public Transport Interchange)," said Roger Nissim, Best Practice Committee member of Harbour Business Forum, at a meeting to discuss the design for the new Central harbourfront in 2008.

The bus terminal outside the Central Pier has been razed already. The exposed yellow soil around the place stands out. The Transport Department said only part of the bus route will be preserved.

The bus terminal outside the Tsim Sha Tsui Ferry Pier was also proposed to be moved to Tsim Sha Tsui East. A plaza was to be established instead. That plan met with rigorous protests and as a result is still on hold.

The policy changes struck at the Achilles heel of Star Ferry.

"Ferry has a disadvantage. It can not take the initiative to take on passengers like buses," Leung explained. "The ferry can only carry people where the pier is located. So how can a pier have no PTI in front of it?"

More than 3,200 ferry passengers at Tsim Sha Tsui pier need to connect to bus service, he added.

In addition, the city's plan to build an enhanced harbourfront will cut off the Ferry's advertising revenue directly.

Leung, pointing to the two huge lightboxes above the Wan Chai pier, said the advertising billboards like the two would not be permitted at the new pier and in the harbour front area.

"Just the disappearance of these two lightboxes will cause an annual loss of HK$3 million," he said.

Commercial activities will also be strictly limited at the new Wan Chai pier. Only 10 shops are allowed at each pier, limiting Star Ferry's rental income.

"None of these changes is what we wanted," Leung sounds helpless.

"And we can not solve this by ourselves."

The company has sought financial support from the government but failed.

"We noticed that the government offered a subsidy of HK$100 million to the outlying island routes in the middle of the year. It occurred to us that we could also apply for it," Leung recalled. "However the government told us we were 'non-essential services' thus Star Ferry did not qualify for the grant."

"Is Star Ferry really dispensable?" he asked in a rising tone.

He says that the ferry can not be replaced by other modern vessels. "If we use a jet ferry, I'm sure you will feel seasick," he said. The Star Ferry has a moderate speed, stable body, and the unique feature that it doesn't need to take a U-turn when leaving the pier. "Traditional wisdom is irreplaceable."

"Besides, it's not just transport. It represents Hong Kong. The word 'collective memory' actually came from Star Ferry," he added.

Will the Star Ferry really disappear in future? Leung said he doesn't know. But he stressed the demise of the ferry would not be what the people of Hong Kong want.

Nancy Kwan, the actress who starred in the World of Suzie Wong, visited Hong Kong earlier this year. The harbour enhancement and reclamation projects were in full swing. Looking out on the changes, she sighed, "You will no longer need Star Ferry soon."
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Old May 31st, 2011, 10:52 AM   #68
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Opinion : Officials must crack down on people feeding feral pigeons at bus terminus
15 May 2011
South China Morning Post

About two months ago I wrote to the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department regarding the alarming feral pigeon population gathered at the Tsim Sha Tsui Star Ferry bus terminus.

I pointed out that entire bags of breadcrumbs were scattered every day directly in front of that large advertising billboard located next to the KMB information desk.

I said pigeon droppings were everywhere and the floor required regular cleaning because of it. The floor was cleaned with fresh water and the puddles that were left behind became a source of drinking water for the pigeons.

I asked that perhaps they should strictly enforce the HK$1,500 penalty for feeding feral pigeons.

I received a reply from an official, on behalf of director of food and environmental hygiene.

It said that the department inspected the locations several times in February and did not see anyone feeding feral pigeons. Also general hygiene standards were satisfactory. This is surprising, or perhaps I just have a different sense of hygiene, because here is what I see every day:

More than 100 pigeons congregating on the ledges of the Star City building overlooking the bus terminus;

About 50 pigeons gathered under the bus terminus canopy (above the KMB info desk);

People lock their bicycles by the railing near the KMB info desk and the seats are either removed or covered with a plastic bag to prevent pigeon droppings getting on them;

Pigeon droppings that are several centimetres thick cover the roofs of the pay phone booths and I see they get cleaned off every few days by PCCW staff; and

Pigeon droppings are just everywhere in general.

I don't know who else to turn to. It appears our government would rather clean the pigeon droppings every day rather than actively stop people feeding the birds.

I understand that the department cannot deploy its officers everywhere at all times.

But it is certainly the case that this location deserves special attention.

Jason Cheung, Hung Hom
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Old June 27th, 2011, 06:31 PM   #69
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Retail area to double under pier plan
Public access to rooftop guaranteed by Star Ferry in its proposal to revitalise Tsim Sha Tsui landmark
1 June 2011
South China Morning Post

The shopping and dining areas of the Tsim Sha Tsui ferry pier will more than double under a plan to redevelop and revitalise the landmark.

The Harbourfront Commission met for the first time yesterday to discuss the project with some members raising concerns about blocking visitors' access to the harbour deck under the new plan.

However, most approve the initial design, including the significant expansion of floor space for shopping and dining. Retail space will increase from 385 to 863 square metres, with an additional 1,472 square metres for dining.

Members questioned whether the new harbour viewing deck would be fully accessible to the public. "Would it be like the new Central Star Ferry pier where people have to get through a restaurant to reach the viewing deck? Is it for real this time?" commission member Nicholas Brooke asked.

Under the redevelopment plan, an extra floor will be added to the original two-storey building. It will have an outdoor roof level for dining and harbour viewing. The new rooftop open space is expected to be 2,404 square metres. But there is no timetable for its completion.

Star Ferry general manager Johnny Leung Tak-hing promised to follow the proposal, which guaranteed public access to the new rooftop.

However, Ian Brownlee, director of Master Plan, a planning consultancy presenting the proposal for Star Ferry, said public access to the new rooftop would still depend on fire safety and emergency planning by the Fire Services Department.

An advocacy group, Our Bus Terminal, said public access was important but praised the proposal asit preserved the pier's outlook and function.

Commission member Paul Zimmerman was worried that giant advertisements on the walls of the building could obstruct the view of the harbour.

"Can you promise us that there will be no neon signs so that we can always see the beautiful building?" Zimmerman asked.

Leung promised there would not be more advertisements than were currently used.

The redevelopment plan aims to restore the pier, which was built in 1958, without changing its original architectural design.

Meanwhile, the commission yesterday approved a proposal to use a ferry service to connect West Kowloon with other key urban areas.
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Old August 8th, 2012, 11:55 AM   #70
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Tsim Sha Tsui Piazza Project shelved
Wednesday, August 8, 2012
Government Press Release

The Government announced today (August 8) the decision to shelve the Tsim Sha Tsui (TST) Piazza Project. The decision was made after the Government fully examined the project and considered the views and aspirations of the District Council (DC) and district personalities.

A spokesman for the Commerce and Economic Development Bureau said, "The Government put forward a revised proposal for the TST Piazza Project in June 2011. Under the revised proposal, the piazza development would have been integrated with the revitalisation of the TST Pier, with an aim of developing the pier and its vicinity into a TST Pier-themed tourism node.

"In order to address the strong aspirations of the Yau Tsim Mong District Council (YTMDC) and the public over the traffic and transport arrangements, we also proposed to expand the planned turnaround outside the Hong Kong Cultural Centre to become a new public transport interchange, so that all 15 bus routes currently using the TST Pier Bus Terminus could continue to call at the TST Pier. The Government arranged for gazettal of works for the expansion of the turnaround in September 2011, and handled more than 7,000 representations received during the period of gazettal in accordance with the statutory procedures. In accordance with the relevant statutory provision, we sought the Chief Executive's approval for extension of the statutory time limit for handling public views for six months to August this year."

The spokesman continued, "Following the introduction of the revised proposal last year, the relevant departments actively conducted technical assessment on the proposal with a view to exploring the feasibility of the project and drawing up a concrete design as soon as possible for further consultation with the DC and the public. Nevertheless, when conducting the initial technical assessment for renovation and expansion of the TST Pier, the works departments discovered that the foundation of the existing pier would not be able to support substantial renovation and expansion with a meaningful increase of floor area for additional open space for public enjoyment of the harbourfront (such as a rooftop garden on top of the existing pier).

"The Government therefore considered re-adopting the original design proposal. However, the expanded turnaround plan for accommodating all 15 bus routes currently using the TST Pier Bus Terminus could not be incorporated into this proposal. If the strong aspirations of the DC for preserving the current level of bus services were to be addressed, the size of the planned piazza would have inevitably been reduced by 40 per cent, from the original size of around 8,500 square metres to around 5,000 square metres. This would not allow adequate room for a substantial piazza development."

The spokesman pointed out that at the meeting of the YTMDC's Traffic and Transport Committee held in July this year, members once again expressed grave concerns over the traffic and transport arrangements under the TST Piazza Project. Given the aforesaid considerations, the Government considered it unviable to adopt the original design proposal.

"Over the past few years, we have made our best endeavours to take forward the project. Nevertheless, we encountered considerable technical difficulties and strong aspirations from the DC and the public for preserving the existing level of bus services. On the other hand, with the opening of the heritage hotel (1881 Heritage) at the site of the former Marine Police Headquarters as well as the development of Canton Road and its vicinity into a popular tourist shopping area in recent years, the additional tourism and economic benefits that the piazza project may bring have become relatively limited. Having balanced these considerations, we have decided to shelve the TST Piazza Project," the spokesman said.

The spokesman noted that the Government would allow the Gazette notice of the turnaround works under the revised proposal to lapse on the statutory deadline (i.e. August 8, 2012), and would arrange to publish a notice in the Gazette that the turnaround works would not be executed. The Government would also inform the stakeholders and relevant parties of the decision to shelve the project.
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