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Old December 23rd, 2010, 04:05 AM   #41
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Opinion : Market revamp will ruin a part of HK's past
9 November 2010
South China Morning Post

I urge the government to halt the Graham Street market redevelopment scheme.

This market is part of Hong Kong's traditional cultural heritage. It is of great historical significance. It represents a part of our past, with local people doing their daily shopping for groceries. Also, the redevelopment scheme will bring with it unpleasant side-effects.

The reconstruction project will take some time. During this period there will be a lot of air and noise pollution in the area. This will bring a lot of inconvenience to local residents.

The government has paid little attention to the consultation reports of different groups objecting to the revamp. The views of some relevant professionals from fields such as planning have been overlooked.

Officials should have taken note of their views.

This would have meant that there was less likelihood of them making fundamental mistakes when embarking on this revamp programme.

Supporters of the revamp have said that preserving the site would hinder the city's economic progress.

But I think it is always important for the government to strike the right balance between maintaining prosperity and heritage conservation.

The "Viva Blue House" in Wan Chai is an excellent example of heritage preservation and economic interests coexisting.

The Blue House will have businesses, such as a vegetarian restaurant and a second-hand goods shop.

Jennifer Lee, Wong Tai Sin
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Old February 21st, 2011, 04:59 PM   #42
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Stallholders have mixed feelings on market move
21 December 2010
SCMP

Tenants of the Graham Street wet market moved to make way for redevelopment have mixed feelings about the project, which will conserve the city's oldest market.

Some say their businesses are struggling at the temporary site, while others say they are happy and looking forward to moving into a new market when the project is complete.

All 14 stalls and shops selling vegetables and meat in the wet market in Graham Street began moving last month to Gage Street, a few minutes' walk away.

Urban Renewal Authority chairman Barry Cheung Chun-yuen said all affected shopkeepers and stallholders were happy with the arrangement and willing to return to the new two-storey structure to be built on the site of the century-old market.

"The Graham Street market is the city's oldest market, which is something we tremendously treasure," he said.

But May Chan Fung-siu, who has run a vegetable shop in Graham Street for more than 10 years and was moved last month, said her business had dropped by more than half at the new location because some of her customers had not yet found her shop. "The new shop is at the end of the street, which is not an eye-catching prime site and is not easily found," Chan said.

She was also struggling to pay the rent, which had more than doubled from the HK$9,000 charged by her former landlord to HK$20,000.

Chan said whether she moved into the new market, to be completed by about 2014, would depend on how much the authority charged in rent.

Chan Cheuk-chiu, who runs a fresh goods stall, and Wong Tai-Tse, who sells traditional snacks and rice dumplings, painted a different picture. Chan, who had been at the Graham Street market for more than 30 years, said the authority was charging him only half his previous rent. "I am very happy with the arrangement and will surely move to the new market," he said.

Wong, who has run her stall since the 1960s, also liked the new site, which she said had a greater traffic flow. "My stall used to be at a quiet corner on Graham Street and has now moved to the junction of Graham and Gage Streets, which is a better location to attract business."

To attract customers to the temporary market, the authority launched a lucky draw on December 11, with prizes including cash coupons for shoppers buying groceries from the shops and stalls in the area.

The draw, which the authority said had attracted more than 10,000 people in the past nine days, will continue until the end of next month.

Meanwhile, Cheung said it would be important to carry out the Sheung Wan redevelopment in phases to minimise the interruption to businesses there.

Therefore, it was worth delaying the redevelopment for 18 to 24 months, which would cost the authority an extra HK$200 million in interest. But he said he did not believe inflation would pose too serious a threat to the project, which covers 5,320 square metres in Graham Street and Peel Street.

The authority said it had not yet been able to work out a total cost for the project, as land acquisition had not been completed.

The authority announced yesterday that it would issue offer letters to owners of 159 properties in its Kowloon redevelopment project on Mau Tau Wai Road and Chun Tin Street.
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Old March 10th, 2013, 07:17 PM   #43
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Old December 11th, 2013, 11:25 AM   #44
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The hidden gem in the cocktail crown
Good luck finding the underground speakeasy 001 without the help of a local guide
6 August 2013
The Globe and Mail

HONG KONG -- We have a map. We also have detailed directions a local hipster kindly scrawled on it.

But apparently that is not enough to find 001, a secret – or, depending on your address, not-so-secret – underground speakeasy in Hong Kong's Central district.

“You'll never find it,” says Olivia Toth, director of public relations at the posh Peninsula hotel where we are staying. So on a steamy June evening she offers to play tour guide.

Cocktails have become a competitive sport in this city; in general, finding a good drink isn't difficult. But nothing beats savouring a sip in a space with a members-only feel, where the hint of clandestine encounters hangs in the air. And that makes 001 the hidden gem in Hong Kong's cocktail crown.

We have already sampled Butler, a lounge routinely ranked as one of Hong Kong's best places to enjoy a tipple.

The owner, Masayuki Uchida, has created a cozy Japanese-inspired 20-seat den where showmanship is key. Clad in bow ties and shirt-vests, bartenders concoct drinks to fulfill almost any whim, adding garnish with the flourish of a magician.

I sip on a China Blue, a lychee and blue Curaçao creation. It's tasty – and fitting for the occasion – but 001 remains a must.

Opened a few years ago, 001 has no website and no discernible street address. It does have a phone number (852-2810-6969), which we use to make a reservation – necessary to guarantee a seat and to avoid being rejected, even when the place is empty. One must also dress well and comport oneself suitably to avoid the embarrassment of not getting in.

Toth takes us to Queen's Road Central where we wander south, uphill along Graham Street, a wet market that first opened in the 1800s and is considered the oldest continuously operating street bazaar in Hong Kong.

Exotic fruits and vegetables are present, along with every imaginable type of meat. So is the overpowering odour of fish as we sidestep entrails in our high heels.


Just before reaching Wellington Street, Toth leads us to an unmarked black door hidden among the stalls and piles of detritus. A spotlight is fixed on a tiny brass buzzer. We press it. Whisked down a set of stairs, we enter a 67-seat sanctuary where the walls are black, the chairs are covered with aquamarine leather and the booths are draped in green velvet.

We are the first to arrive at 6:30 p.m. on a Thursday, but the place fills quickly and the chatter soon rivals the jazz.

I order a gimlet. It boasts the perfect amount of sour and I admit I emptied my glass in an instant.

“We don't advertise,” manager Jameson Ang says matter-of-factly. “It's all word of mouth.”

And, perhaps a little hand-holding to make sure you get there.

The writer was a guest of Peninsula Hotels. The company did not review or approve this article.
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Old March 8th, 2014, 01:43 PM   #45
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Ink dries on historic Hong Kong shop's final chapter
South China Morning Post
5 March 2014







Cans of printing ink line the teak shelves of the Nam Wah Company shop, which has been supplying local and mainland printers since before the second world war.

But its long history comes to a full stop tomorrow when the three-storey building on Wellington Street reverts to the government to make way for an Urban Renewal Authority redevelopment along Peel Street and Graham Street in Central.

Conservationists had called on the government to save the building and allow 76-year-old owner Tsui Pak-kim and his family to continue the business, which was founded by Tsui's father.

Campaigners have praised its unusual architectural style and cultural significance: the name of the company was written on the second-floor balcony by calligrapher Su Shijie, a revolutionary ally of Dr Sun Yat-sen, founder of modern China. While the Nam Wah shop will be demolished, the building next door, home to Wing Woo Grocery for 80 years, will have its façade preserved.

Tsui, who took over the business from his father when he was about 30, said the business moved from nearby Cochrane Street in the 1950s because it needed more space. The ground floor of the new shop, a former bakery built before the war, was for sales; upper floors for storage.

"In the old days, the volume of work meant we could barely meet deadlines," he said of the days before personal computers, when companies relied on his clients to print all of their documents. "Now business must have dropped more than 80 per cent.

With deteriorating eyesight, he produces a business card, on which the shop's phone number features only seven figures, reflecting the fact it dated to before the mid-1990s when a No2 was added to all landline numbers. Most of its clients are on the mainland now, he adds.

He has not decided whether to revive the business at a new location, but is not optimistic.

"It's difficult because we own this shop and we don't have to pay rents. If we moved somewhere, we wouldn't be able to afford the high rents," he said. "Whenever a person has to leave a place where he has spent decades, he can only sigh."

Lau Kwok-wai, executive director of the Conservancy Association Centre for Heritage, said the open balconies in the building were rare and became rarer still in the 1960s and '70s, when many owners closed them off for residential use.

The shop was featured in a book published by the centre and the Central and Western District Council, and Lau believed the building should be preserved.

Katty Law Ngar-ning, of the Central and Western Concern Group, said the building should be preserved with the grocery.

"They go together very well," said Law, who criticised the URA's approach to heritage and said it had not encouraged businesses to carry on at their present locations.

The URA said it had worked with the community to develop a master plan for the site and carried out a heritage report. The decision not to preserve the shop was accepted by the Town Planning Board and the Antiquities and Monuments Office, it said.

It will build hotels, flats, offices and shops on three sites totalling 5,000 square metres, connected by public open space.

The authority has often been criticised for clearing locally owned businesses and long-term residents out of areas to make way for chain stores and luxury flats.
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Old October 8th, 2014, 05:45 PM   #46
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By Anthony_Chu from dcfever :





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Old April 7th, 2015, 08:14 PM   #47
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Last orders as decades-old businesses make way
1 April 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Shutters crashed down for the last time on decades-old cafes and stores around Graham Street Market – but one owner vowed to fight on after yesterday’s deadline to make way for an Urban Renewal Authority redevelopment.

“I’m not giving them the keys,” said Lau Lai, owner of the Kwan Lok Restaurant, a traditional Hong Kong-style cafe on Gage Street. “I think it’s unbelievably unfair that only some stalls get relocated to the new market after it’s been built, but none of us cooked-food stores. Why?”

While stalls selling fresh food and vegetables will be rehoused as part of the redevelopment of the old area in Central, the HK$800,000 compensation Lau received after a decade of running the business will not even cover severance pay for her 11 staff.

First announced in 2007, the URA’s redevelopment will add new shops, a hotel and offices to the area around Gage Street, Cochrane Street, Wellington Street and Kin Sau Lane.

But there is no room for most of the old shops or restaurants. Tenants have been moved out in phases since 2013.

Most owners are resigned to the fact they will never find new premises nearby.

Chak Yu-cheung served his customers for the last time at his hole-in-the-wall Shanghai Kitchen on Staveley Street. The restaurant has been there for 50 years and Chak has been in charge for 33 of them.

“This is the end of it. There’s nowhere else to go,” Chak said, wiping his brow as his workers bustled around dishing out HK$30 meals of meat, rice and Chinese soup to his mainly working-class customers. “We have tried to speak out and asked to be included in the new market, but we’re the minority here and so I guess we weren’t loud enough in our demands.”

Tong Kim-chi held out hope of finding a new spot for his 70-year-old fishball and noodle shop Sun King Kee.
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Old April 10th, 2015, 06:11 PM   #48
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70-year-old Sun King Kee noodle shop makes way for Hong Kong URA project in Central
29 March 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Fishballs have always been part of life for Tong Kim-chi, 68. Since he was a toddler, he has eaten daily at the Sun King Kee noodle shop founded by his father, in Gage Street, Central, in 1945.

Now, Tong has three sons of his own and serves up the dish as boss of the shop to regulars including his five grandchildren.

But not for much longer. Tong will say goodbye to the shop and the memories it holds this week and hand it over to the Urban Renewal Authority. The URA is replacing a swathe of old buildings in the area with a complex of shops, homes and a hotel. More than 10 shops on Graham Street, Gage Street and Peel Street must move out by Tuesday.

With no chance of finding another shop nearby for the HK$40,000 a month he pays in rent, Tong has no option but to close. Paying higher rents would mean he could no longer sell noodles at HK$30 per bowl while using only fresh ingredients.

"Everything we offer is freshly made by ourselves every day," he said. "The fishballs and fillets are made from fish caught in the local sea, not farmed fish."

The noodle shop started out as a traditional dai pai dong, or outdoor food stall, to serve the Central's working-class population - decades before the high-end shops and bars moved in.

Since it moved indoors in 1967, the shop has changed little - the tiles on the walls and floor, the round, folding tables and even the metal chopstick cylinders are all decades old. Despite its modest setting and affordable prices, noodles are served in porcelain bowls instead of the cheap plastic ones used in cha chaan teng.

"The ladle for pouring the noodle soup is handmade and more than 60 years old," Tong says, adding he wanted to donate some of the items to a museum.

A poster on a wall of the steaming kitchen reads: "Prevention of cholera. Avoid cross-contamination of raw and cooked foods." It is turning yellow, but the boss keeps it as a reminder to keep food fresh and hygienic.

On a wall opposite are pictures from a fashion shoot in the shop and news clippings. Its unique vibe has drawn food and travel writers, as well as film stars Ricky Hui Koon-ying, Simon Yam Tat-wah and Annie Liu Xin-you.

With closure imminent, regulars are lining up for a final bowl of noodles - and many are leaving messages on Post-It notes on a board outside the shop.

"Sun King Kee adds a drop of freshness into Hongkongers' memories," reads one. Another says: "Times are changing, but the taste of good food will stay forever in our hearts. I hope the government will preserve cultural heritage, and keep more restaurants with character."

Tong remains hopeful that the URA will find a place for the displaced shops in the new development. If not, he plans to find another job - perhaps teaching others how to make fishballs.
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Old October 21st, 2015, 02:46 PM   #49
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Save these old colonial ruins, urge activists
21 October 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt





Fears for forgotten buildings as nearby Graham Street market revamped

A group of community activists is calling on the government to assess and protect a row of ruined buildings hidden near the Mid-Levels escalator and possibly one of the earliest settlements in the former British colony.

It has also discovered an old shop front, which it says offers a unique insight into trading in the city decades ago.

Covered in bushes, the area of No. 27-35 Cochrane Street in Central at first sight looks abandoned. But after walking through a narrow alley accessible only from nearby Wellington Street, a row of old brick walls is visible.

Central and Western Concern Group consulted a heritage restoration expert, Wong Hung-keung, who said the walls may be the remains of tenement houses that could have been built between the 1830s and 1911.

On nearby Peel Street, where the Urban Renewal Authority plans to demolish old buildings to make way for a residential block, the concern group found an old drainage channel and a storefront bearing the sign “Ying Kee Hard Coal”. Wong estimated the sign was at least 70 years old and showed that coal was once traded in Hong Kong.

The area around the walls is also designated for redevelopment by the URA as part of a plan to revamp the Graham Street market. Construction has already begun nearby, but the area near the walls has not been sealed off. Part of the area is used by restaurant kitchen staff for cleaning food and storage.

Central and Western Concern Group convenor Katty Law Ngar-ning said: “The Urban Renewal Authority said they have done a heritage assessment of the area, but they never mentioned this area. Do they even know the walls exist and why they are there?”

Law said she hoped the government could assess the historical significance of the walls and sign and make plans to preserve them after consulting the public.

“My fear is the Urban Renewal Authority will damage the walls before any assessment is done.”

The Graham Street bazaar is one of the oldest wet markets in Hong Kong. Vendors have been selling fresh food like vegetables and seafood for over 140 years, attracting locals and tourists.

In 2007, the URA unveiled a plan to replace the street market and surrounding sites with housing, retail space, offices and a hotel at a cost of HK$3.8 billion.
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Old January 3rd, 2016, 06:34 AM   #50
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At the Wet Market by Jens Schott Knudsen, on Flickr
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Old December 3rd, 2016, 06:32 PM   #51
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"vanishing street life" (i) by hugo poon, on Flickr
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Old December 11th, 2016, 07:32 AM   #52
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This is one of the major problems with Hong Kong. Some buildings that look like absolute shit on the outside actually contain very vibrant marketplaces and many small businesses.
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Old December 11th, 2016, 12:31 PM   #53
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These vibrant outdoor markets are geared towards lower income consumers who would not pay extra to shop in a nice, clean, air-conditioned mall. That's why when older districts get redeveloped, these markets go with them.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 03:22 PM   #54
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Graham Street by cwk mos, on Flickr
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