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Old December 24th, 2010, 04:46 AM   #181
quashlo
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Well, they are planning for 500 kph, but I wouldn't necessarily be surprised if that increases in the future.
After all, the opening is still planned for 17 years from now. No doubt there will be further advancements in the technology.

Not sure if these have ever been posted, but these are the specs from an MLIT presentation (2010.04.15):



Here's the translation of the details:
Maximum commercial speed: 500 kph (planned)
Maximum test speed: 581 kph (2003, Yamanashi maglev test track)
Maximum acceleration: 7.2 km/h/s
Minimum curve radius: 8,000 m (Yamanashi test track standard)
Maximum grade: 4% (Yamanashi test track standard)
Line-haul capacity: Approx. 10,000 pphpd (technology development standard)
Maximum train length: 16 cars
Maximum train capacity: Approx. 1,000 passengers
Maximum trains per hour: 10 tph (per direction)
Weight: Approx. 25 t per car
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Old December 26th, 2010, 11:41 AM   #182
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post



Here's the translation of the details:
What are the rows showing 1 and 1,7, and 10 and 13 (H22.3)?
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Old December 26th, 2010, 12:22 PM   #183
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I think they are:

1 and 1,7 are the number of ten thousand (10000 and 17000) passengers that could be transported each hour on each line.

10 and 13 are the number of trains/hour for each line. The H22.3 is the Japanese way of saying which year it is. H stands for the Heisei era which is the current one (it's based on the emperor and starts when he was inaugurated, before that it was the Showa era), the 22.3 shows the year and month of the era, which can be translated to march 2010.
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Old December 27th, 2010, 04:42 PM   #184
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@quashlo Thank you ! By the way, the PDF you linked to seems quite captivating. Too bad i don't understand japanese.
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Old December 27th, 2010, 10:12 PM   #185
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25T per car? how small are they?
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Old December 27th, 2010, 11:45 PM   #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay View Post
25T per car? how small are they?
They#re not particularly, they just don't have epecially heavy components like bogies and motors in them any more, this is entirely different technology from standard rail, and thus you'll see entirely different spec. readouts.
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Old December 28th, 2010, 04:02 AM   #187
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I see, no wonder they go so fast... how come China's transrapid train is double the weight (50T coaches vs 25T coaches) if they are the same size?
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Old December 28th, 2010, 12:49 PM   #188
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Quote:
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I see, no wonder they go so fast... how come China's transrapid train is double the weight (50T coaches vs 25T coaches) if they are the same size?
Though they're both magnetically levitated, they use entirely different technologies again, with the Transrapid having heavy permanent magnets along the entire underside of the train, or at least that's part of the reason I believe..
I'm not sure exactly what constitued to such weight losses in the Japanese system, though
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Old December 31st, 2010, 03:50 PM   #189
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Will the Chuo Shinkansen start at Tokyo Station? Or Shinagawa?
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Old December 31st, 2010, 04:05 PM   #190
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Shinagawa with the current plan.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 10:48 PM   #191
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JR Central president hints at possible acceleration of Chūō Shinkansen’s extension to Ōsaka
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/atmoney/ent...OYT8T00582.htm

Quote:
In regards to construction of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev project, which JR Central is planning to fund completely on its own, railway president Yamada Yoshiomi accepted an interview with Yomiuri Shimbun and hinted at the possibility that the opening of the full line from Tōkyō (Shinagawa) to Shin-Ōsaka—originally targeted for 2045—could be pushed forward. In a midterm report published at the end of last year by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism’s (MLIT) Transport Policy Council, the council requested that the railway consider accelerating the extension to Ōsaka and push forward the scheduled opening of the full line, but this represents the first time that Yamada has specifically mentioned an acceleration of the schedule.

So far, JR Central has championed a plan that would allow the company to regain its financial footing about eight years following the 2027 opening of the Tōkyō – Nagoya section before groundbreaking on the extension to Ōsaka.

In regards to this, Yamada commented that it “might be possible to compress the eight-year recovery timeframe by focusing efforts on reducing costs,” specifically identifying reduction of maglev construction costs and reevaluation of staff deployment on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen following the opening of the maglev to Nagoya.

In addition, in the event that cost reduction can be achieved through mass production (such as through export of the maglev to overseas markets), Yamada indicated that there would likely be “very strong merits” in reducing construction costs for the Tōkyō – Nagoya section, estimated to reach ¥5.1 trillion.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 10:53 PM   #192
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JR Central to announce approximate alignment and station placement to local governments
http://www.chunichi.co.jp/article/na...502000012.html

Quote:
JR Central will soon announce to local governments a more detailed plan for the Chūō Shinkansen maglev, including the route and proposed locations of intermediate stations (one station per prefecture). In preparation for the environmental assessment slated to start this autumn, the railway plans to first indicate the selected route within a three-kilometer allowance. Coordination with local jurisdictions, particularly with regards to the funding process for construction of intermediate stations, has become a major topic, but the railway will begin serious discussions after presenting local governments with the proposed alignment.

Direction from the national government to begin construction on the maglev is expected to come this summer. In an interview with Chūnichi Shimbun, JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi commented, “Even with regards to station area improvements, there is a need to establish a preparatory structure with local governments, and discussions must continue to move forward when we get the OK sign to begin construction.”

Together with ground and geotechnical survey data, the railway is expected to first present local government officials with the expected alignment within a three-kilometer allowance (a requirement as part of bird nesting ground surveys) and the placenames of areas slated for new stations.

According to the MLIT, the environmental assessment for the Hokkaidō Shinkansen is being conducted assuming a 25- to 50-meter allowance for alignment and a 250- to 500-meter diameter allowance for station placement. As the maglev’s environmental assessment is aiming to conform to the process for past extensions to the Shinkansen network, the railway must narrow down the alignment and station placement before the assessment can begin.

In regards to station placement, Yamada remarked that “locations that cross through multiple municipalities would be difficult to coordinate,” specifically mentioning the situations for Yamanashi Prefecture and the Tōnō Region of Gifu Prefecture. Yamada also indicated that the railway will refrain from releasing information for the time being should it not receive a request from local governments regarding an intermediate station.

Meanwhile, for Nagano Prefecture, the only major city along the proposed route is Iida City. As a result, Yamada commented that “it would be difficult to obtain a consensus among most Nagano residents for a station placement in the south (in Iida City),” and hinted that the railway is envisioning an alignment that avoids the urbanized areas, home to JR Iida Station, and instead passes through the northern parts of the city. It appears that the railway will make some effort to appease the Kami-Ina and Suwa Regions, which had petitioned for maglev routes that would have avoided the Southern Alps by detouring to the north.

In a midterm report on the maglev project published late last year by an advisory committee of the national government, a route cutting straight through the Southern Alps was selected. However, the route is currently only refined to within a 20-km range, and it’s unclear exactly where the alignment will pass.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 10:56 PM   #193
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New building development at Nagoya Station to serve as gateway for maglev station
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...F2F2F2F2F2F2F2

Quote:
Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) has revealed plans to design the Nagoya Station New Building (provisional name), slated to be constructed next to JR Nagoya Station, as the main gateway to the Chūō Shinkansen maglev’s Nagoya Station, planned to open in 2027. The first floor and other parts of the new terminal building will include station-related facilities, attracting passengers alighting from the maglev’s Nagoya Station, which will be constructed underground. The new building will serve as the central facility for the maglev’s Nagoya Station, and the railway aims to revitalize the area surrounding the station through a synergistic effect between the maglev and the new building.

JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi revealed the news in a January 4 interview with the Nihon Keizai Shimbun. Yamada said that “station facilities would be constructed on the first floor and underground levels” of the new terminal building, and the first thing passengers alighting onto the maglev station platforms (slated to be 30 m underground) would see when rising to ground level would be the new building.

In regards to the maglev’s route in the area surrounding Nagoya Station, Yamada indicated that it would be an east-west alignment, crossing perpendicular to the Tōkaidō Shinkansen running north-south through the station. The maglev platforms would be a long east-east west structure, with the new building serving as the gateway on the east side of the station. However, Yamada also remarked that the railway would investigate into other ideal alignments, and there is a possibility that a separate gateway could be created at the west side of the station.

The Nagoya Station New Building development is scheduled to open in FY2016. Yamada said that the sales floor area for the JR Nagoya Takashimaya department store scheduled to lease space in the building is “undecided,” but said that the railway has “no intentions” for a battle with the Matsuzakaya Nagoya flagship department store to secure the title of “largest department store in Nagoya.” Instead, Yamada indicated that the railway is looking to prioritize profitability over size.
Renderings of the new building:
Source: JR Central

The new building (46 stories, 3.01 million sq ft GFA) is the rightmost of the three. This was already a planned project, but I believe this may be the first time it is specifically referred to in the context of the maglev.

The two towers on the left are the JR Central Towers (51 and 53 stories, 3.82 million sq ft GFA). JR Central has become a major developer around Nagoya Station... Not a surprise since it’s the hub of their network.



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Old January 8th, 2011, 01:25 PM   #194
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This was an interesting reading. I just don't have time to translate the article...
Maglev Chuo Shinkansen is a huge project involving $60B and it's not surprising that various contractors are bidding for this project. And they are showing off their latest tunnel boring technologies to win the bid. Some analysts predict technological spin-offs.
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1802011-n1.htm

Google translation: "Linear" means maglev in this translation.

Quote:
[Drama] Battle polished tunnel technology companies scramble to 5 trillion yen through the Southern Alps linear (1 / 3 page)
2011.1.8 18:00

Construction work to extend the tip of the Yamanashi Maglev Test Line was released to the press-afternoon on December 13, Uenohara City, Yamanashi Prefecture (photo太Kiriyama Hiroshi)
JR Tokai to build, "Super Express" dream Linear Chuo Shinkansen, construction 2014, opened for 27 years, started to run. Tokyo in December last year - decided the route between Nagoya straight line between the Southern Alps. Accounted for approximately 70% of the tunnel 286 kilometers same section, that can reach 1400 m depth from the top surface construction "of the century," he. The general contractor company, further refining the world's highest tunnel drilling technology, be eager to prey on the order. Total construction cost of the battle that kicked off 5.4 trillion yen.
Maximum depth of 1400 m
"Because the technology works is required, you want to appeal to active" (senior executive officer of Obayashi Harada Shiyouzou)
"It also highlights projects for the industry" (Oka Toshirou senior executive officer of the Toda)
Determined by the route, general contractor company, is sparking already.
Domestic construction investment this year is expected to fade in the 40 trillion yen at half the peak cooling demand reduction in public works and private construction is linear, but much-needed projects.
Nana, as well as penetrating the root with a series Takamine Rupuru 3,000 meters above sea level, in order to minimize land acquisition, through most of them deep underground. 45 years Nagoya aimed at opening - the total cost, including more than 9 trillion yen to Osaka.
"As well as direct investments (such as peripheral development), the ripple effect is tremendous," (Japan Civil Engineering Contractors Association President Nakamura Mitsuyoshi)
Only a big project to carry herself construction industry expectations suffer a recession, "intense competition for orders is unfolding" (Head of Sumitomo Mitsui Construction Civil Shinichiro Kumagai) is sure.
"Self-Propelled Drill"
But before any construction over three years, companies are not eager to sell its own technology. The key to the orders, but shortening the construction period and reduce costs.
Kashima weapons, will speed construction in parallel with concrete walls and drilling through fractured rock shield machine. Just to complete the tunnel construction of the wall and the secondary leakage after the excavation process. Has been adopted by Shinkansen tunnel construction Yomogita Hokkaidou Tsugaru already enough track record.
Obayashi, diving beneath the ground like a self-propelled drilling machine shield movie comes out to finish the excavation of the section, we developed a new method to come back to earth again. Significantly by reducing drilling and construction of a starting point for cutting the mountain, "can be reduced to one third of conventional construction," (the company) proudly.
Leading edge of the device is installed on more drilling, exploration system was accurately predict where the geology. Geological Survey in the past, must be made to prospect, we can expect significant cost savings.
Shimizu point of appeal, "eco" it. As a member of the tunnel wall, was destroyed, using materials developed PET bottle fiber. "Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the construction of small earth-friendly," but as selling strategy.
Also boost overseas orders
Tunneling technique polished mountains in Japan occupy much of the land, "the world's best in the area" (the president of Obayashi Shiraishi Tooru).
Ishihara Yuuzirou old movie starring "The Sun of Kurobe," drawn in, as well as a tunnel through the Alps Kanden of Kurobe, and length about 54 km Seikan tunnel between Hokkaido and Honshu, the world's most difficult work after another successful and has accumulated a technology.
Linear construction of this tunnel, "in the preferred construction, the District of Engineering, finely divided, is expected to be ordered over the final 10" (official) said. Major companies are able to earn reasonable orders, one company per share is less likely.
Minutes, the lack of construction costs and compete with the shortness of construction companies on an equal footing, just as a chance to show off.
In a shrinking domestic market, but find a way out for both foreign companies in projects in developing nations, including the continued construction of the price of uncollected hasty orders, has become a serious risk.
Increased proportion of domestic order linear boom "in reducing the risk of burned overseas projects, leading to the recovery of earnings" (Kawashima Hiroki senior analyst at Nikko Cordial Securities) is expected to benefit.
More than anything, you can appeal to the linear cutting edge technology in construction, power and a larger position in the international competition for orders in the future pillars of growth. The linear construction, likely to put the prestige of their large construction contractor. (Imai Yuuzi)
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Old January 9th, 2011, 08:21 AM   #195
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Japan offers to fund maglev for Northeast Corridor in U.S.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110108...20110108002747

Quote:
WASHINGTON (AFP) – Japan has offered to fund part of a project to build an ultra-fast train line between Washington and New York, which would revolutionize travel on the US east coast, a Japanese official said Friday.

In talks with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Japanese Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara proposed that the Japan Bank for International Cooperation would fund a portion of the first phase of a project to bring Maglev trains to the US, said Satoru Satoh, the Japanese embassy press attache.

The proposed first phase of the project would see a Maglev train, which can travel at speeds of up to 341 miles per hour (550 kilometers per hour), link Washington with Baltimore some 60 miles (100 kilometers) to the north and currently an hour's train ride away.

The Maglev line would eventually be extended to New York, more than 200 miles from Washington, putting the Big Apple and Baltimore closer to the capital in terms of travel time than many suburbs in Virginia and Maryland.

New York would be an hour away from Washington once the Maglev is up and running instead of the current four hours.

Baltimore, which is linked to Washington by a commuter train that takes an hour and 10 minutes, would be around a quarter of an hour away.

The proposal is still just that -- a proposal -- and has to be taken up with the US Department of Transportation, governors through whose states the trains would travel, and others.

Maehara's proposal is part of a renewed push for "economic diplomacy" by Japan, said Satoh.

Japan's Maglev and Shinkansen bullet trains are contenders for President Barack Obama's 13-billion-dollar project to develop high-speed rail travel in the United States, which at present is non-existent.

China, France and Germany are among other countries vying to sell their trains and technology to the Americans for the multi-billion-dollar project.

During a visit to Japan last year, US Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood took a test ride on the ultra-fast magnetic levitation train, which hovers 10 centimeters (four inches) above the tracks and in 2003 reached a world record speed of 581 kilometers per hour (361 miles per hour) on a Japanese test track.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 10:24 PM   #196
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What are the termini of the now 18 km test track, and what shall be the termini of the 42 km test track in 2013?
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Old January 10th, 2011, 04:04 AM   #197
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Chūō Shinkansen maglev set to become a battleground for general contractors and tunneling technologies
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1802011-n1.htm

Quote:
The Chūō Shinkansen maglev, the so-called "ultra-express of dreams" being constructed by JR Central, is on its way to a groundbreaking in FY2014 and an opening in 2027. In December of last year, the Southern Alps route connecting Tōkyō and Nagoya in a straight line was selected. About 70 percent of the 286 km distance on this section is tunnel, with the depth of some tunnels reaching 1,400 m from ground level in this "Construction of the Century." General contractors are further polishing up their tunnel excavation expertise, already some of the best in the world, with their eyes vigilantly open in the hope of winning an order. The stage is set for a struggle to win contracts for the ¥5.4 trillion project.

1,400 m at its deepest
"This is construction that demands technical expertise, so we are looking to actively market our skills." (Harada Shōzō, Senior Managing Executive Officer and Director, Ōbayashi Corporation)

"This is a centerpiece project for the industry." (Oka Toshirō, Senior Managing Executive Officer, Toda Corporation)

With the selection of a route, general contractors are already in a frenzy.

In the midst of forecasts that domestic construction investment this fiscal year will drop below ¥40 trillion—half of what it was in its peak—as a result of a reduction in public works projects and a cooldown in private-sector demand, construction of the maglev is one project that leaves construction firms salivating in anticipation.

The route involves tunneling through the Southern Alps, which reach as high as 3,000 m in altitude, but half of those tunnels will pass deep underground in order to keep land acquisition to a minimum. The total construction cost when including the Nagoya ‒ Ōsaka section, slated for a 2045 opening, exceeds ¥9 trillion.

"It's not just the value of direct investments... The ripple effect (such as from surrounding land development) is also substantial." (Nakamura Mitsuyoshi, Chairman, Japan Civil Engineering Contractors Association)

For a mega-project that on its own bears the hopes of an industry struggling with the downturn in the construction market, it's clear that "the stage is set for a fierce struggle to win contracts." (Kumagaya Shin'ichirō, Chief Civil Engineer, Sumitomo Mitsui Construction)

Self-propelled drills
While groundbreaking is still over three years away, firms are earnestly marketing their unique technologies and skills. The key to winning contracts for the project is shortening the construction schedule and reducing cost.

Kajima Corporation's weapon is a rapid construction method that simultaneously solidifies the tunnel walls as the shiled machine drills through solid bedrock. After the machine reaches the other end, leakage treatment and the second-stage construction for the walls are all that's needed before the tunnel is complete. The method is a proven technique and is already in use on the Hokkaidō Shinkansen's Tsugaru Yomogita Tunnel.

As for Ōbayashi Corporation, it's developed a new construction method in which a shield machine dives belowground from the surface like a self-propelled drill from movies. After finishing excavation, the machine returns to surface level. The method dramatically reduces the work for the launch box, which can involve cutting into mountainsides, and Ōbayashi boasts that it can "reduce the construction schedule to a mere one-third of what it used to be."

In addition, Ōbayashi developed a probe system that places a device at the very tip of the excavation to predict the geology of the tunnel sections ahead to a high degree of accuracy. Up until now, geological surveys required workers to conduct test bores, but the new system promises substantial cost savings.

Shimizu Corporation's marketing point is "green." The company developed a material that incorporates fibers from used PET bottles for use in tunnel walls. Shimizu plans to market the technology as an "environmentally-friendly construction with low carbon dioxide emissions."

Impetus for overseas orders, too
Japan's tunnel excavation technology, refined through construction in the mountainous areas that cover most of the country, is "some of the best anywhere in the world." (Shirashi Tōru, President, Ōbayashi Corporation)

With examples including the Kurobe Dam's Kanden Tunnel—cutting through the Northern Alps and depicted decades ago in the film "Kurobe no Taiyō" starring Ishihara Yūjirō—and the 54 km Seikan Tunnel linking Hokkaidō and Honshū, Japan has successfully completed some of the most difficult tunneling work anywhere in the world, accumulating an array of technical expertise.

According to officials, the tunneling work for the maglev "prioritizes construction schedule, dividing contracts into shorter sections with the expectation of ultimately awarding work to 10 or more contractors." Major firms will be able to secure contracts according to their abilities, but it's very likely that each company's cut of the total work will get smaller.

As a result, each of the companies is competing on the same level over construction speed and cost savings, creating a true arena for firms to show off their skills.

As the domestic market shrinks, contractors are looking for an "escape route" in overseas contracts, but the risk involved with these efforts is becoming more and more apparent. In particular, there have been continuing cases of firms being unable to recoup construction costs due to a hasty bidding process.

If the share of domestic contracts increases as a result of special demands generated by the maglev project, there's also likely to be benefits with the "reduction of risks associated with overseas projects and the resulting increase in profitability." (Kawashima Hiroki, Senior Analyst, Nikkō Cordial Securities)

More than anything, marketing cutting-edge technologies in the construction of the maglev will become a powerful influence in the battle to win contracts in overseas markets, identified as a cornerstone of Japan's future growth. The maglev construction is set to become one mega-project where general contractors place their prestige on the line.
I translated 2co2co's article... Very interesting, and I'm curious just how much time / cost savings this could actually mean for the project.
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Old January 20th, 2011, 07:44 PM   #198
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The Chuo Maglev will initially link the Kanto and Kansai metro areas via the Chubu region. Once the technology gaines acceptance and ridership begins to plateau, newer, enhanced generation trains will cut the travel time between the two cities (Tokyo and Osaka) to just under an hour. From the "JR Linear Motorcar schematics and test proposals of the late 1990s" -- when the trains first broke the 500kph records -- it is theoretically possible to shave that travel time down to about ~45mins, or roughly the time it takes to reach neighboring Shiga from Osaka Eki.

Moving into the second half of this century (2050-2100), JR will leverage the successes of the Chuo Maglev to extend the network from Tokyo to Hokkaido (via Sendai) in the north, and Osaka to Fukuoka (via Hiroshima) in the south. We may not get the chance to experience it, but based on the long term planning JR has for this project, it will one day be possible to commute from Kyushu to Hokkaido, via Maglev alone, in about three hours.

Moreover, cities like Nagoya, Sendai, Okayama, etc. will continue to see greater influxes of the workforce that will commute to the "neighboring" metropolises.
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Old January 21st, 2011, 02:06 PM   #199
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I've found this map of the planned Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka line, with what looks like planned stations names. Unfortunately, it's written in japanese (i don't post it here because of its size) :

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_VdrGK5-RZx...3130439cac.gif
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Old January 21st, 2011, 10:48 PM   #200
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Do you know where the image is taken from?
Looks really interesting and it seems like there might be more of them.
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