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Old May 23rd, 2011, 08:35 AM   #221
quashlo
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Contractors market new tunneling technology to win maglev contracts
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0729008-n1.htm

Quote:
General contractors are locked in a fierce battle to develop new technologies to accelerate the construction schedule and reduce costs for tunnel construction work. In December of last year, the straight-line Southern Alps route, 70 percent of which would be tunnel work, was approved as the alignment of JR Central’s proposed maglev Chūō Shinkansen connecting Tōkyō and Nagoya, and contractors are keen on new business opportunities to open up as a result. The firms believe that marketing cutting-edge technologies is critical to securing contracts for a mega-project that will cost a total of approx. ¥5.4 trillion, and are in a heated flurry to develop new technologies and build expertise to meet the demands of the maglev project.

On May 19, Ōbayashi Corporation announced that it had introduced a new construction method for the Ōi District Tunneling Work (886 m) for the Central Circular Expressway Shinagawa Route currently under construction in Shinagawa, Tōkyō, compressing the construction schedule to one-third of the typical schedule using current construction methods. The new construction method uses a shield machine (tunnel boring machine) that acts like a self-propelled drill, burying underground from the surface and returning to the surface after the work is complete. As construction work at the starting point of the boring can be substantially reduced, Ōbayashi accelerated a construction schedule that normally takes two years to a mere eight months. This new method is also being used on four projects including the Cross-Sagami Kawashiri Tunneling Work in Kanagawa Prefecture, and Ōbayashi hopes to polish its skills in an effort to secure contracts for the maglev tunneling work.

Meanwhile, Kajima developed a construction method that allows excavation (using a shield machine drilling through solid bedrock) to proceed simultaneously and in parallel while solidifying tunnel walls using concrete. After excavation, the tunnel only requires leakage treatment and secondary work on the walls before completion. The method is a proven technique and is already in use on the Hokkaidō Shinkansen's Tsugaru Yomogita Tunnel. Taisei Corporation has developed simulation technology that faithfully replicates the structure of the tunnel and ground layers and the parameters of the work in 3D. The simulation allows engineers to predict how the ground will change as a result of the excavation, and Taisei says it has the benefit of devising a rational solution to reducing the impacts of excavation, such as improvements to the ground structure.

Site of tunneling work, where Ōbayashi Corporation has introduced a new construction method. (May 19; Shinagawa Ward, Tōkyō)
Similar to the previous article a few months ago, but with more details.
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Old May 23rd, 2011, 08:41 AM   #222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Railfan View Post
apart from the obvious differences between the German and the Japanese train, what are the technical characteristics of each?
The Transrapid system uses attraction(EMS) while JR Maglev uses Repulsion(EDS).
Both has it's ups and downs and no real major technical advantage over the other, I believe. For Pros and cons of each system read here.
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Old May 23rd, 2011, 09:27 AM   #223
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Japan's new maglev: two-hour train trips between Sydney and Melbourne?
http://www.ausbt.com.au/japan-s-new-...-and-melbourne



Australian perspective on maglev
Quote:
The travel time over the 438 km between Tokyo and Osaka will be nearly halved, with the current two hour journey cut by 51 minutes to a speedy 67 minutes.
Last I heard, Nozomi trains needed 2:26 for trip, or 146 minutes.

Exactly when have they been sped up to 118 minutes (1:58)?
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Old May 23rd, 2011, 10:53 PM   #224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
It makes sense that this train is so streamlined. Can someone tell me why the German maglev seems much less streamlined compared to this one?
The main reason why all (not just Maglev) Japanese high speed trains are more streamlined than any other ones, are due to that they use smaller diameter tunnels and have stricter noise regulations than the rest of the world.

The main reason why they use smaller tunnels are that they are cheaper to make and with the massive amount of tunnels on new Shinkansen lines (70% for the new Maglev line) then every bit helps to keep the cost down.
The small diameter tunnels are more prone to tunnel booms (entering/exiting tunnels at high speed creates sonic booms) as the speed increases, and coupled with the strict noise regulations (maximum of 70 dB in built up areas) then they have to work with the train aerodynamics to reduce the noise as much as possible, thus the long "nose"...
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Old May 25th, 2011, 09:25 AM   #225
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Last I heard, Nozomi trains needed 2:26 for trip, or 146 minutes.

Exactly when have they been sped up to 118 minutes (1:58)?
Yep, 2.5 hours between the Kansai-Kanto metro areas via Nozomi. The article is wrong.
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Old May 27th, 2011, 07:41 PM   #226
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Government gives green light to JR Central to begin construction of maglev
http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/new...-endorsed.html

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JAPAN: Central Japan Railway announced on May 27 that it had received a directive from Transport Minister Akihiro Ohata 'to proceed with construction' of the planned 550 km Chuo Shinkansen maglev line between Tokyo and Osaka. Under discussion since the early 1970s, this is now expected to cost in excess of ¥9tr.

Having agreed in December 2008 to take responsibility for building and operating the line, JR Central had already received government approval for the project in December 2010. The operator is already undertaking environmental assessments for the route through the Southern Alps to the north of Mount Fuji, with a view to starting construction in the financial year beginning on April 1 2014.

In its latest announcement, the railway said it would 'strive to carry out the Chuo Shinkansen project as soon as possible, with the co-operation of municipalities and others.' Construction of the 500 km/h maglev route is intended to relieve the existing Tokaido Shinkansen and halve journey times between the three principal cities. It would put Nagoya around 40 min from Tokyo and Osaka just 67 min from the capital. However, it is uncertain whether any other intermediate stations would be provided, as previously requested by the local authorities.

Work is already underway on extending the superconducting maglev test track in Yamanashi prefecture from 18•4 km to 42•2 km, and this is due to be completed in 2012. Last year the railway ordered a 'pre-production' fleet of 14 Series L0 maglev vehicles for the extended test track, which will be delivered by 2015.

The test track is intended to form part of the new line, of which the 290 km initial section between Tokyo and Nagoya is now expected to open in 2027. However, the start of revenue services on the remainder of the line to Osaka is not envisaged before 2045.
Approved maximum operating speed is 505 kph.

ANN news report (2011.05.27):



More videos of testing on the Yamanashi test track (2011.05.21):
Source: ji2kqk on YouTube



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Old June 1st, 2011, 09:37 AM   #227
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Maglev terminus will be at Shin-Ōsaka; JR Central hints at acceleration of Ōsaka opening
http://www.asahi.com/kansai/travel/n...105310011.html

Quote:
In regards to the opening of the full length of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev—set to open between Tōkyō and Ōsaka slated for 2045, at a regular press conference on May 30 JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi made references to speeding up the timeline: “After opening the Tōkyō – Nagoya section (slated for 2027), we are hoping to extend the line to Ōsaka as quickly as possible.” In addition, in regards to the terminus of the line in Ōsaka, Yamada again reiterated the railway’s intention to make use of Shin-Ōsaka Station on the Tōkaidō–San’yō Shinkansen, saying, “It would be pointless not to connect to Shin-Ōsaka.”

On May 27, Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Ōhata Akihiro sent out a directive to JR Central to begin construction of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev. After environmental assessments and other tasks are completed, JR Central plans on breaking ground in FY2014. The Tōkyō – Nagoya section is slated to open in 2027. Once the full length of the line opens between Tōkyō and Ōsaka, travel time will be 67 minutes. Travel times would be as fast as 112 minutes between Tōkyō and Okayama and 147 minutes between Tōkyō and Hiroshima when using both the Chūō Shinkansen maglev and San’yō Shinkansen (omitting transfer time).

In regards to the benefits of establishing the maglev station at Shin-Ōsaka, Yamada explained, “We want people in Hiroshima, Okayama, and other areas to use the line. We absolutely have to ensure convenient transfers with the San’yō Shinkansen.” In regards to the Tōkyō end, the maglev station will be constructed at Shinagawa.
NHK video report:
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...205471000.html
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Old June 1st, 2011, 10:27 AM   #228
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Maglev schedule

So consider the stages of Chuo Shinkansen.

Stage I:
has been operational for some time. Length 18 km.
Stage II:
now under construction. Shall open for service in 2013. Length 43 km.
Stage III:
shall start construction in 2014, completed for service in 2020. Termini Sagamihara and Kofu. What is the length and trip time?
Stage IV:
shall start construction when? Completed for service 2027. Termini Shinagawa and Nagoya. Length 286 km, trip time 40 min.
Stage V:
shall start construction when? Completed for service 2045. Termini Shinagawa and Shin-Osaka. Length 438 km, trip time 67 min.
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 07:34 AM   #229
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Stage III travel time is supposed to be about 15 minutes. Rough measurement from Google Earth is 70 to 80 km, but perhaps we will be able to get a better idea once JR Central releases its proposed stations (see below).

Stage IV will probably start construction 2014 as well.

We don’t know yet when Stage V will start construction.
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 07:38 AM   #230
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JR Central to announce list of proposed station locations in June
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-b...0110602a5.html

Quote:
NAGOYA — Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Tokai) is expected to present its choices for stations on the magnetically levitated train line between Tokyo and Nagoya as early as month's end, sources said Wednesday.

In its report, to be submitted to local governments along the line, JR Tokai will also detail the route for the maglev train, which is expected to debut in 2027.

With each prefecture along the line to be allocated one station, the expected site for Kanagawa Prefecture is Hashimoto Station in the city of Sagamihara.

As for Yamanashi, Gifu and Nagano prefectures, several sites are bidding to host a station or are in ongoing discussions with local authorities. As a result, JR Tokai will hear local opinions before reaching its final decisions.

Tokyo's terminal for the maglev line is currently expected to be Shinagawa Station.

JR Tokai plans to start construction in fiscal 2014 so it can start full service between Tokyo and Osaka in 2045, following the launch of the Tokyo-Nagoya operation.

Last week, the government instructed JR Tokai to construct the Tokyo to Osaka maglev line on a route running through the Southern Alps.

The train is expected to link Tokyo and Osaka in 67 minutes, running at a maximum speed of 505 kph.
More recent news from yesterday....
This should soon give us a better idea of the exact alignment.

Candidate station locations:


Source: Nihon Keizai Shimbun

Last edited by quashlo; June 2nd, 2011 at 07:46 AM.
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Old June 3rd, 2011, 10:29 AM   #231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
JR Central to announce list of proposed station locations in June
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-b...0110602a5.html
Where are the stations of Stage I and Stage II?
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Old June 3rd, 2011, 08:17 PM   #232
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Stage I and Stage II do not have stations...

These are the stations in that map, from left (west) to right (east):

Aichi Prefecture
Nagoya Station

Gifu Prefecture
Nakatsugawa Station (Nakatsugawa City)

Nagano Prefecture
Takamori Town

Yamanashi Prefecture
Northern part of Ichikawa–Misato Town
Southern part of Chūō City

Kanagawa Prefecture
Hashimoto Station (Sagamihara City)

Tōkyō Prefecture
Shinagawa Station
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Old June 3rd, 2011, 08:18 PM   #233
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Anyways, I drew out this map of the Yamanashi Test Track (built + extensions), so it may make some of the alignment issues easier to see:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...34589&t=p&z=10
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Old June 5th, 2011, 09:46 PM   #234
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Some un-official (but still very official-looking) renderings of possible alignments in the Iida area.
Source: http://donboolacoo.blog92.fc2.com/

Alignment 1: North of the Shimo-Ichida Industrial Estate



Alignment 2: New station between Shimo-Ichida Station and Moto-Zenkōji Station
This one appears to be the favored alignment currently.



Alignment 3: New station between Chūō Expressway and National Route 153

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Old June 6th, 2011, 03:37 AM   #235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Some un-official (but still very official-looking) renderings of possible alignments in the Iida area.

Wow looks pretty realistic but I guess the one big difference would be that there would not be overhead catenary wire hmm Just saying lol.
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Old June 6th, 2011, 06:40 AM   #236
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Anyways, I drew out this map of the Yamanashi Test Track (built + extensions), so it may make some of the alignment issues easier to see:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...34589&t=p&z=10
Loved how you extended the map to Shin-Osaka although I believe the Tourism board of Nara prefecture would like to talk with you in private with a pitch fork in his hand if they ever see it.
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Old June 6th, 2011, 07:40 AM   #237
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Well, I couldn't really find a good place to put the maglev. I wanted to take it via Iga (lots of open land, shorter distance), in which case dipping any further south to serve central Nara (only to go back north to serve Shin-Ōsaka) was a huge detour and required avoiding all the suburban development between central Nara and Ōsaka. The problem is that Nara Prefecture is so built out that it was hard to find any good alignment without lots of tunneling and / or land acquisition.

My "Shin-Nara Station" would be where it crosses the Kintetsu Kyōto Line and JR Katamachi Line, so it actually has decent access from the existing rail network... It's just in the middle of nowhere. The other problem is that this location is officially Kyōto Prefecture and not Nara Prefecture, although I think it stall qualifies as "near Nara City" depending on interpretation. In any event, I will probably take another look at it later, along with the rest of my alignment.
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Old June 6th, 2011, 01:57 PM   #238
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Well, I couldn't really find a good place to put the maglev. I wanted to take it via Iga (lots of open land, shorter distance), in which case dipping any further south to serve central Nara (only to go back north to serve Shin-Ōsaka) was a huge detour and required avoiding all the suburban development between central Nara and Ōsaka. The problem is that Nara Prefecture is so built out that it was hard to find any good alignment without lots of tunneling and / or land acquisition.

My "Shin-Nara Station" would be where it crosses the Kintetsu Kyōto Line and JR Katamachi Line, so it actually has decent access from the existing rail network... It's just in the middle of nowhere. The other problem is that this location is officially Kyōto Prefecture and not Nara Prefecture, although I think it stall qualifies as "near Nara City" depending on interpretation. In any event, I will probably take another look at it later, along with the rest of my alignment.
Yeah, the two old capitals, Nara and Kyoto have been bashing each other out on which prefecture should obtain the right for a station.
Nara is saying it's our turn while Kyoto won't budge knowing there would be losing income in tourism if they do.
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Old June 7th, 2011, 08:24 AM   #239
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Could South Exit of Shinjuku Station be next station on maglev?
http://zasshi.news.yahoo.co.jp/artic...entaku-bus_all

A magazine article I missed from February of this year, but I thought it was an intriguing tidbit:

Quote:
Total construction cost: Approx. ¥8.5 trillion.
Opening date: 2045.

The contentious issue of the maglev’s route has been decided—the roughly straight-line Southern Alps alignment—and the program for the Chūō Shinkansen maglev is set, with a final report this spring and groundbreaking slated for FY2014. But now, surprising information is surfacing regarding this project which JR Central has staked its very likelihood on for many years now. Regarding the establishment of new stations on the maglev, JR Central is making moves behind the scenes in an “unexpected location”, and the forces that first detected the movements are now moving in on purchasing land and properties in the area to secure interests.

This “unexpected location” is the South Exit of Shinjuku Station—a narrow strip along the west edge of the Yamanote Line stretching from Shinjuku Station towards Yoyogi Station. Piecing together statements from multiple sources gives the following details.

“Currently, the Chūō Shinkansen maglev’s terminal station is at Shinagawa Station, just as JR Central says. But behind the scenes, there is a proposal to someday to take the maglev line up to Shinjuku Station using a network of super-deep underground tunnels over 40 m below the surface of the ground and construct a new maglev station. In addition, the railway is envisioning extending the route even further beyond Shinjuku in the future. When it comes down to it, the Shinjuku Station hub is one of JR East’s citadels. Invading the stronghold is a long-awaited dream of JR Central, a bitter rival of JR East.” This “once-in-a-century” mega-chance, which JR Central is pursuing with “exceptional determination”, has groups from related industries, developers struggling under the recession, and even politicos with close connections to JR scrambling to be the first in line. Amidst all this, properties around the maglev’s terminal station, which the earliest maglev plans had already placed in the Tōkyō area, suddenly became the focus of attention. In fact, persons with legal credentials are already making moves in the Shinjuku Station South Exit area, carrying around documents for property acquisition offers. The maglev is a once-in-a-century mega-project. It’s only natural for industry insiders and others to turn frantic, and eyes will be glued on these movements for at least the time being.
I could see an extension to Shinjuku as a long-term goal, but I wonder where they envision extending it after that. Perhaps Narita? I can’t really think of any other destination… Anything north of Shinjuku is the heart of JR East Shinkansen territory. Ikebukuro maybe?

JR Central is also supposed to announce their proposed station locations (within a radius of 5 km) later today.
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Old June 7th, 2011, 12:16 PM   #240
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Could South Exit of Shinjuku Station be next station on maglev?
http://zasshi.news.yahoo.co.jp/artic...entaku-bus_all

A magazine article I missed from February of this year, but I thought it was an intriguing tidbit:



I could see an extension to Shinjuku as a long-term goal, but I wonder where they envision extending it after that. Perhaps Narita? I can’t really think of any other destination… Anything north of Shinjuku is the heart of JR East Shinkansen territory. Ikebukuro maybe?
Is Tohoku adequately served by wheeled Shinkansen (3:05 Tokyo to Aomori when sped to 320 km/h, how much to Sapporo? Wakkanai and beyond?) or are there any current plans for Tohoku maglev (and Sanyo maglev, for the matter)?
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