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Old June 30th, 2011, 07:49 PM   #261
Tyr
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I don't quite understand. How does it switch to one track to the other, it has to have the walls on either side to go?

And what is the acceleration of the maglev compared to a standard shinkansen? I can't seem to find acceleration figures around.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 07:55 PM   #262
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Comparison of maglev vs. steel-wheel Shinkansen is here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=181

Maximum acceleration is 7.2 km/h/s for the maglev, compared to 2.6 km/h/s for steel-wheel Shinkansen.

That slide also has the other technical data that may be of interest as well. As you can see, they are envisioning a maximum of 10 tph, which is pretty good service.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 09:26 PM   #263
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This video shows how the switches work (just after 1:00):

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Old June 30th, 2011, 10:07 PM   #264
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Yeah, the concept isn't all that different from straddle-type monorail switches where connected sections of the beam move independently but in unison, except this time you're moving sections of the guideway.


Source: soniccer883 on YouTube
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Old July 1st, 2011, 03:15 PM   #265
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ahh! Right!
Makes sense with the video. Thanks.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 11:52 AM   #266
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Short Al Jazeera feature on the maglev (2011.07.01):



It appears they got the opening year wrong, though... 2025 was the original target date.
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Old July 9th, 2011, 02:47 PM   #267
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It says earlier than planned because of the disaster. Eh? They've changed things?
That would be awesome.
But then later it says 40 more years....hmm....
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Old July 10th, 2011, 12:10 PM   #268
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I think they got that bit of info wrong.

There has been no concrete announcement about a 2025 opening to Nagoya... It's still 2027.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 07:10 AM   #269
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Ōsaka City mayor pushes for central Ōsaka maglev station
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...E2E2EBE0E0E4E5

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In regards to the station on the Chūō Shinkansen maglev planned by Central Japan Railway (JR Central), Ōsaka City mayor Hiramatsu Kunio indicated in an interview with Nihon Keizai Shimbun that “a station in central Ōsaka City was preferable over Shin-Ōsaka.” At a May press conference, JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi revealed plans to connect into Shin-Ōsaka to accelerate the Ōsaka extension of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev and provide transfers with the existing Shinkansen, but it seems likely that the terminal station will become a heated topic of debate.

Mayor Hiramatsu indicated his belief that not having the original Shinkansen station at Ōsaka Station was a huge minus for Ōsaka’s economy: “Ōsaka’s industrial composition would be different had the Tōkaidō Shinkansen served Ōsaka Station instead.” In addition, Hiramatsu stressed, “If the maglev doesn’t make it to the heart of Ōsaka, it won’t be a true hub or terminal.” However, Hiramatsu avoided making any reference to whether “central Ōsaka City” meant Umeda—home to Ōsaka Station—or Namba further south.

Hiramatsu hasn’t expressed his convictions to JR Central yet, but said, “I hope to bring up the issue in the near future.” The city has some authority with regards to the environmental assessment and urban planning for construction of the maglev station.

The stations and alignment of the Tōkyō – Nagoya section of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev scheduled to open in 2027 have largely been decided. By accelerating the Ōsaka extension, originally scheduled for 2045, there is a possibility that debates over the station’s location and whether the station is underground or deep-underground will also begin earlier than originally planned.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 07:10 AM   #270
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JR Central hints that maglev may actually pass through Kyōto Prefecture
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...2141016-n1.htm

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At a press conference in Ōsaka City on July 7, in regards to the Nagoya – Ōsaka route of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev slated to open in 2045, JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi hinted that there is a possibility the train would pass through southern Kyōto Prefecture in the vicinity of Nara City: “While the master plan calls for a route ‘in the vicinity of Nara City’, there is nothing that says it has to be ‘within Nara Prefecture’.” Kyōto’s financial sphere has been calling for an alignment passing through Kyōto Prefecture, such as a route through JR Kyōto Station connecting to the Tōkaidō Shinkansen.

On June 7, JR Central published the location of proposed intermediate stations on the Tōkyō – Nagoya section of the line slated to open in 2027, and hopes to commence the environmental assessment of the Tōkyō – Nagoya section as soon as this year. As the construction cost is estimated at over ¥9 trillion for the full length of the line, the railway plans to prioritize construction of the Tōkyō – Nagoya section.

In regards to the schedule for the environmental assessment for the section of the line west of Nagoya, Yamada only remarked, “It’s still too far into the future, and we can’t say anything at this point.”

Meanwhile, in response to Ōsaka City mayor Hiramatsu Kunio and the local financial sphere in Ōsaka City, who have been lobbying for a maglev terminal station in central Ōsaka City, Yamada re-emphasized the railway’s intention for a terminal at Shin-Ōsaka Station: “A station other than Shin-Ōsaka would actually make it inconvenient for passengers from Okayama (and other areas on the San’yō Shinkansen).”

In addition, in regards to the Chūō Shinkansen maglev requiring three times the electricity consumption of the Tōkaidō Shinkansen, Yamada continued to stress the railway’s plans to move forward with the project: “Since the opening of the Tōkaidō Shinkansen we have taken up efforts to improve the energy efficiency of trains, and we will do the same for maglev trains with future technological development.”
Sounds like I may have been lucky and gotten it right with my proposed maglev alignment near Nara.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 07:11 AM   #271
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Yamanashi will prioritize terminal functions at proposed maglev station
http://www.asahi.com/travel/rail/new...106200475.html

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Regarding infrastructure improvements for the area surrounding the proposed intermediate station on the Chūō Shinkansen maglev slated to be constructed in the Kōchū area, in June 20 Yamanashi Prefecture expressed intentions to focus on the station’s terminal functions to prioritize transport access to other major cities, instead of constructing a new residential neighborhood or commercial district. The prefecture now plans to assemble opinions from the affected cities, towns, and villages, including them in the maglev strategic vision to be compiled in 2012.

Governer Yokouchi Shōmei announced the news in response to questions posed during a session of the Prefectural Assembly.

In the prefectural urban master plan approved in March of this fiscal year, the Prefectural Government revealed a policy to concentrate urban functions such as residential neighborhoods, retail facilities, and public facilities in the central city instead of expanding them to suburban areas. In light of the plans, Governor Yokouchi said that infrastructure improvements surrounding the new maglev station would “not involve development of new urban areas.” By strengthening access with major transport hubs in Yamanashi Prefecture such as central Kōfu City and the area around JR Yamanashi-shi Station, Governor Yokouchi said he hopes to expand the station’s functions as a transit terminal.

Specifically, the infrastructure would be “designed like an airport”: transfers would be streamlined by securing connections with stations on the JR Minobu Line and stops on expressway buses, and a secondary facility would be connected to the maglev station housing a parking facility, bus terminal, souvenir shops, and other functions.

By the end of the year, the Prefectural Government will select a specific candidate station location and confirm the transport requirements for the station, evaluating specific implementation methods while gathering opinions from experts and local jurisdictions.

During the question session, Governor Yokouchi remarked, “The opening of the maglev is Yamanashi Prefecture’s big chance to shine, and we need to make it a catalyst for revitalization. I hope we can expand the large plus benefits generated by the maglev to all of Yamanashi Prefecture.”
I’m typically against suburban or greenfield stations, but getting it into Kōfu was going to be ridiculously expensive. For a relatively small city like Kōfu, keeping most of the functions in the downtown area is probably a good thing, as they’ve been trying to redevelop the area around Kōfu Station.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 07:12 AM   #272
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High school near Hashimoto Station is preferred candidate location for maglev station
http://mainichi.jp/area/kanagawa/new...20333000c.html

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Kanagawa Prefecture, Sagamihara City, JR consider options
Regarding the establishment of an intermediate station on the Chūō Shinkansen maglev, which JR Central is targeting for a 2027 opening, it was revealed that Kanagawa Prefecture and Sagamihara City have been moving forward on coordination assuming the grounds of the Kanagawa Prefectural Aihara High School abutting the South Exit of JR / Keiō Hashimoto Station (Midori Ward, Sagamihara City) as a likely station site. This is the first time a specific candidate location for the intermediate station on the maglev Shinkansen has been revealed. JR has accepted local intentions and has been evaluating options with an eye towards establishing the station on the high school grounds.

JR Central is scheduled to break ground on the Tōkyō – Nagoya section of the line in FY2014. Within Kanagawa Prefecture, the line will be constructed on an underground alignment from the terminal station at JR Shinagawa Station (Tōkyō Prefecture), and the intermediate station to be established in Sagamihara City will also be an underground station. The construction cost is estimated at approx. ¥220 billion, and JR officials have been requesting that local governments bear 100% of the costs.

The high school grounds which could potentially be home to the future maglev station are prefecturally-owned land comprising 97,700 sq m. The grounds are a premier location next to Hashimoto Station, served by the JR Yokohama Line and Sagami Line and the Keiō Sagamihara Line. Based on the alignment through Sagamihara City, the site has the most convenient access, and without other locations where large-scale urban redevelopment projects can take place, the high school grounds surfaced as the preferred candidate location.

Should the high school grounds be selected as the location of the maglev station, the high school will be forced to relocate all of its facilities. In terms of possible sites for the relocated school, the former campus of the Polytechnic University under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW), scheduled to be closed as part of the government’s project screening process, has surfaced as a likely candidate. The campus is located in a residential neighborhood about three kilometers west of Hashimoto Station, with a site area of approx. 240,000 sq m. After closure of the university, the school’s staff and students are expected to relocate to the university’s Tōkyō Campus in Kodaira City, Tōkyō Prefecture.

Kanagawa Prefecture and Sagamihara City plan to offer payment to the national government to acquire the former campus, securing approx. 10,000 sq m of the site for the relocated high school. As for the remaining approx. 140,000 sq m, proposals have surfaced to use the land as transfer land when purchasing additional land around the existing high school as part of the establishment of the maglev station, or to develop the land with new city facilities.

Land values around the high school were approx. ¥228,330 per 10,000 sq m last fiscal year. Meanwhile, the area around the Polytechnic University campus are ¥95,800 per 10,000 sq m. If the increased revenues from urban development projects generated by establishment of a maglev station can be directed towards the cost of acquiring the Polytechnic University campus from the national government, the cost burden for local governments can be reduced.
Site of the high school and possible site of the future maglev station:
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=%E7%A5...ius=15000&z=16
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 07:12 AM   #273
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Maglev will use vertical shafts to evacuate passengers
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/da...en110531_1.htm

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Installation of stairwells and elevators
After receiving the construction go-ahead from Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Ōhata, JR Central is set to truly begin moving on its Chūō Shinkansen maglev project, targeted to open with superconducting maglev technology. Following the Great East Japan Earthquake and the JR Hokkaidō limited express derailment and fire, the project will become Japan’s first application of a maglev Shinkansen, requiring facilities to ensure passenger safety, even when faced with disaster exceeding expectations.



Full stop in 90 seconds when traveling at 500 km/h
In response to a question concerning the maglev’s seismic design provisions at a May 30 press conference, JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi emphasized his intention to leave no stone unturned when it comes to safety measures: “If there is new expertise, we’ll more than gladly incorporate it.”

In the Great East Japan Earthquake, the seismic reinforcements initiated following the Great Hanshin Earthquake paid off, with the Tōhoku Shinkansen escaping major damage. JR Central will design and construct the maglev using the same standards as the Tōhoku Shinkansen.

The superconducting maglev uses magnetic forces to float trains approx. 10 cm above the track, running along a box-shaped trackway. In addition to preventing derailments using the side walls of the box trackway, the trains will decelerate while still levitated, even if power fails.

Even when traveling at 500 km/h, the maglev will be able to come to a complete stop in 90 seconds during emergency situations using twice the braking performance of the regular Shinkansen. JR Central says that passengers will feel impact and pressure “roughly similar to a bus rapidly decelerating” when the train comes to an emergency stop.

Vertical shafts every 5 to 10 km
The maglev will be constructed on a direct route cutting straight through beneath the Southern Alps. While this will be the shortest route, the train will be running in tunnels 70% of the time. As the line will cross several fault systems including the Median Tectonic Line and the Itoigawa–Shizuoka Tectonic Line, the possibility of damage such as tunnel collapse occurring during a large-scale earthquake cannot be denied.

In the Southern Alps, JR Central will bore a long-distance tunnel (approx. 20 km) through the ground, as much as around 1,400 m below the surface, while in the inner surburban areas of major cities, the line will run several tens of meters below the ground. As the maglev tunnels will have a larger cross-sectional area than their Shinkansen counterparts, JR Central plans to establish escape routes in the space beneath the tracks.

Japan already has several long-distance tunnels through mountainous terrain, including the Jōetsu Shinkansen’s 22 km Dai-Shimizu Tunnel, running as much as 1,300 m beneath the ground surface. In regards to evacuation guidance for passengers, Yamada explains, “We will borrow from the line of thinking on these (existing) tunnels.”

In deep underground tunnels, the railway will establish vertical shafts connecting to ground surface at 5 to 10 km intervals during construction of the line, evacuating passengers using stairwells and elevators installed inside the vertical shafts.

In 1991, before completion of the Yamanashi test track, the maglev learned a bitter lesson following a wheel fire at the test track in Miyazaki Prefecture. As a result, the railway plans to use fire-resistant materials in the trains and other equipment, allowing for the evacuation of passengers in the 20 to 25 minutes before the train truly begins to start burning.

However, the operation of maglev trains will be controlled by the control room aboveground, and operators will not be on board during regular service. Specific tests, including of the required crew size to guide about 1,000 passengers per train during evacuation, will only now just begin.

In the JR Hokkaidō limited express accident, evacuation guidance inside the tunnel has become a focal point of debate. “When we do detailed design, we will continue to exchange opinions with the Fire and Disaster Management Agency (FDMA) and others to ensure adequate safety,” stressed Yamada.
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Old September 21st, 2011, 10:51 PM   #274
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Maglev train's test run in heavy rain
https://english.kyodonews.jp/photos/2011/09/116145.html



Quote:
Central Japan Railway Co., a railway operator commonly known as JR Tokai, demonstrates before reporters a test run of its magnetically levitated train in Tsuru, Yamanashi Prefecture, on Sept. 21, 2011, despite strong winds and rain caused by Typhoon Roke. The train achieved a speed of 500 kilometers per hour during the test, with a company official saying the test proved it is a ''vehicle highly resistant'' to rain and winds. (Kyodo)

Last edited by PJeka; September 21st, 2011 at 11:01 PM.
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 08:32 AM   #275
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JR Central halts maglev tests to prioritize test track extension
http://e.nikkei.com/e/fr/tnks/Nni20110915D1509A23.htm

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NAGOYA (Nikkei)--Central Japan Railway Co. (9022), or JR Tokai, said Thursday that it will suspend tests of a magnetic-levitation train at the end of this month to give priority to extending the test tracks.

Maglev trials are currently conducted on an 18.4km stretch in Yamanashi Prefecture. Plans call for extending the tracks to 42.8km at a cost of roughly 355 billion yen. Construction was initially slated to take place while test runs were conducted.

JR Tokai aims to complete the extension at the end of 2013, about three months ahead of schedule, said President Yoshiomi Yamada. Once the work is finished, the firm plans to conduct trial runs with the passenger cars that will be used when the service launches. The test tracks will become a section of the maglev line linking Tokyo and Nagoya.

Next Thursday, JR Tokai will open offices in the prefectures that the maglev line will run through. These offices will provide local residents with information such as environmental assessments.
The day of the rainy test run (2011.09.21) also happened to be the last day of testing with the MLX-01, which began running in April 1997 with the completion of the Yamanashi test track. A total of nine cars (five end cars and four middle cars) of this series were produced. The MLX-01 set the world speed record of 581 km/h on 2003.12.02 and has traveled a cumulative distance of 877,000 km in test runs, helping to refine JR Central’s maglev technologies related to air resistance, durability, etc. Trains will again begin running on the test track in late 2013 with the prototype L0 series, the first series designed for revenue service.

asahi.com video report from the Yamanashi Test Center (2011.09.21):

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Old September 23rd, 2011, 10:34 AM   #276
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Is the tunneling for the extension complete yet?
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Old September 26th, 2011, 09:44 AM   #277
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No, but maybe next year sometime? The extension is supposed to be completed by the end of FY2013 (i.e., before March 2014).

This article from 2010.12.14 says that excavation of 57% of the tunnels had already been completed at the time.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 04:49 PM   #278
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Has there been any solid map yet for where the line will go in the Nagoya-Tokyo stage?

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I’m typically against suburban or greenfield stations, but getting it into Kōfu was going to be ridiculously expensive. For a relatively small city like Kōfu, keeping most of the functions in the downtown area is probably a good thing, as they’ve been trying to redevelop the area around Kōfu Station.
that...hmm....
So much for the theory I've heard banded about of Kofu becoming a wealthy suberb of Tokyo.

Last edited by Tyr; October 16th, 2011 at 04:57 PM.
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Old November 21st, 2011, 12:42 PM   #279
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http://www.nikkei.com/news/headline/...E3E2E2E2E2E2E2
リニア中間駅 JR東海、一転5900億円全額負担へ

JR Central announces that it will pay for the constructions of stations in Yamanashi, Nagano and Gifu prefecture. These are the prospective stations between Tokyo and Nagoya, which JR Central was asking local governments to fund the construction, should they wish for one.

The original price tags for stations were 35B yen ($450 million) for ground level and 220B ($2.9 billion) for underground.

Last edited by 2co2co; November 21st, 2011 at 01:20 PM.
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Old January 31st, 2012, 12:01 AM   #280
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A news feature on the maglev Chūō Shinkansen, and how it will transform Japan. Japanese only.



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