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Old September 7th, 2013, 02:25 AM   #601
quashlo
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JR Central plans maglev yard, station at Mino Sakamoto Station
美乃坂本駅北にリニア中間駅 JR東海、車両基地も検討

http://www.gifu-np.co.jp/news/kennai...22_20854.shtml

It was revealed on 2013.09.04 that JR Central has selected the north side of Mino Sakamoto Station on the JR Chūō Line in Sendan-bayashi, Nakatsugawa City (中津川市千旦林) in Gifu Prefecture as the proposed site for an intermediate station on the Chūō Shinkansen maglev set to open in 2027 between Tōkyō and Nagoya. The railway is also apparently considering the nearby Nakatsugawa Laboratory of the Gifu Prefectural Research Institute for Agricultural Technology in Hilly and Mountainous Areas (岐阜県中山間農業研究所中津川支所) as the proposed site for a new railyard for the maglev. Detailed information regarding the station and railyard sites and maglev alignment will be announced on 2013.09.19 as part of the environmental assessment of the line.

In particular, the railyard would be about 2.5 km long and a maximum of 0.5 km wide, requiring an estimated total area of 70 ha. The Nakatsugawa Laboratory covers about 12 ha located approx. 2 km northeast of Mino Sakamoto Station, and currently conducts research on stable production of chestnuts and other agricultural tests. Gifu Prefecture says it has no comment regarding its potential response should JR Central place an offer to acquire the land, as the Prefectural Government has yet to hear a formal statement from the railway.

A separate railyard is also planned somewhere in Sagamihara City, Kanagawa Prefecture.

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Old September 8th, 2013, 06:42 AM   #602
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Now that the 2020 Olympics have been awarded to Tokyo I dearly hope that JR Tokai will partial inaugurate the Chuo Shinkansen between Yamanashi and Hashimoto to showcase this technology to all around the world.
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Old September 8th, 2013, 07:11 AM   #603
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
Now that the 2020 Olympics have been awarded to Tokyo I dearly hope that JR Tokai will partial inaugurate the Chuo Shinkansen between Yamanashi and Hashimoto to showcase this technology to all around the world.
On the news today there was mention made of the possibility of offering/promoting exhibition rides on the Yamanashi section to Olympic visitors.
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Old September 8th, 2013, 09:40 AM   #604
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
Now that the 2020 Olympics have been awarded to Tokyo I dearly hope that JR Tokai will partial inaugurate the Chuo Shinkansen between Yamanashi and Hashimoto to showcase this technology to all around the world.
Yes now with the games awarded there is a stronger case for a partial opening in 2020.

Wasn't the first Shinkansen made ready for the 1964 games

Last edited by Hegemonic; September 9th, 2013 at 09:42 AM.
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Old September 12th, 2013, 04:32 AM   #605
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When do you think we will see a new speed record broken?
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Old September 12th, 2013, 06:00 AM   #606
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Quote:
Wasn't the first Shinkansen made ready for the 1964 games
Yes, but I think that project was specifically intended to be completed in time for the games. The Chuo Shinkansen maglev is JR Tokai's privately financed venture that has nothing really to do with the Olympics nor necessary for its success- having a portion open in 2020 will just be a fortunate occurrence.
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Old September 12th, 2013, 10:34 AM   #607
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Yes, but I think that project was specifically intended to be completed in time for the games. The Chuo Shinkansen maglev is JR Tokai's privately financed venture that has nothing really to do with the Olympics nor necessary for its success- having a portion open in 2020 will just be a fortunate occurrence.
Looks as if that is not going to happen either.

Quote:
CEO of JR Tokai announces no chance of opening early

At the regular press conference held on the 11th Sept., CEO of JR Tokai announces that it will be impossible to shorten the construction schedule of the Chuo Shinkansen to meet the Olymics game deadline of 2020 explaining the fact that it will take more then 10 years to tunnel the southern Japanese alps mountain lines and prepare stations at both Shinagawa and Nagoya.
He also states that there will be no partial opening to greet foreign guest for the games either and will limit the rides at the Yamanashi test site to foreign dignitaries during that period.

http://www.asahi.com/business/update...309110012.html Link to source in Japanese.
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Old September 13th, 2013, 01:34 AM   #608
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Pudong line and Chuo Line

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Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
Looks as if that is not going to happen either.
Unless that's posturing to get government funding. As far as I recall, there was a chance to get a line from Shinagawa to Kofu in 2020 from the start... but I agree, taking it all the way to Nagoya would be a pretty incredible feat in just under 7 years.

As for Shanghai's German tech and the Japanese system, they are fundamentally different. Essentially one pulls the train up and the other pushes the train up. However, the big difference (and possibly the reason for the stability challenges) is that transrapid's system only hovers ~1cm above the track, and needs constant computation to keep it from colliding. Japan being a country of earthquakes probably didn't like that idea. The Chuo line trains will hover at about 10cm when travelling over 150km/h.

As for the Shanghai system running at 430km/h, another reason it doesn't go faster than that is that it doesn't need to. The trip is less than 8 minutes or so to downtown and people in China aren't so crazy about saving a few minutes like Japanese are. If the extension would've gone in, it would've had a higher operating speed.

That being said, the Chuo's starting speed using today's technology is 500km/h but the line's top speed is potentially much higher than that. Additionally, if a train is skipping a station, closing off the platform makes it a whole LOT safer to bypass the station at higher speeds. IT's not just about people's safety entering the track area (intentionally or accidentally).

My guess is that the trains being built are being designed to operate at 550-600km/h but the Japanese are always conservative in their top speed estimates. This is why the Chinese took an older series E2 Japanese train and routinely run them (CRH-2) at higher speeds than they do in Japan. The Japanese safety margins are conservative.
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Old September 13th, 2013, 06:58 AM   #609
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I'm pretty sure the original plan was 2020ish Kofu to Sagamihara. Now I've heard a lot of muttering about speeding up development for a 2019 Kofu to Shinagawa. Odd that this announcment then comes in. Hope it gets overturned. The symetry with '64, even if it is only a partial line, would be great.
It seems somewhat believable to me that it could happen. Japan as a whole is horribly slow and inefficient with infrastructure building but Tokyo can usually get such things done pretty quickly, and with the Olympics to prepare for any local opposition to building will be dampened.
But yes. Nagoya is impossible, even to Tokyo is really pushing themselves.
Long story short I better really get moving on saving up for a house in southern Kofu!


re: chuo and top speed- even with todays technology it can do faster than 500, at the moment it is restricted by the short test track.

Quote:
No noise hoods for maglev crossing over Tenryū River
リニア「覆い」天竜川設けず JR検討 騒音基準下回る
http://www.shinmai.co.jp/news/201309...I090009000.php

On 2013.09.05, it was revealed that JR Central will likely not install concrete noise hoods on the Chūō Shinkansen maglev bridge spanning the Tenryū River between Zakōji, Iida City (飯田市座光寺) and Takagi Village, Shimo-Ina District (下伊那郡喬木村). Apparently, noise analysis for the preliminary environmental assessment for the line, to be published soon, indicates that noise levels would not exceed the established 70 dB threshold for the homes closest to the line.

Over 80% of the 286 km maglev alignment between Tōkyō and Nagoya will be in tunnels, with the majority of the daylight sections buffered by noise hoods to meet Japan’s strict noise standards (70dB for residential areas and 75 dB for other areas). Of the approx. 50 km through Nagano Prefecture, approx. 3 km between the Zakōji / Kamisato–Iinuma areas in Iida City on the river’s right bank and Takagi Village on the river’s left bank will be aboveground and daylight. As a result, this may end up being one of the few sections along the alignment offering views of the maglev trains in operation at full speed.

===

As mentioned previously, they still plan on having small window “portals” along the noise hoods, allowing passengers inside the trains to see the outside change one scene at a time, sort of like a flipbook.
Though usually local councils would be pressuring for noise reduction and totally covering up the line I do wonder whether there may be some councils wanting a minimum of obstruction so they can promote themselves as a tourist spot for rail fans.

Last edited by Tyr; September 13th, 2013 at 07:08 AM.
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Old September 19th, 2013, 12:02 AM   #610
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Nara City mayor proposes incinerator site for maglev station
奈良・環境清美工場移転問題:ごみ焼却施設跡地、リニア駅整備に活用 市長が構想

http://mainichi.jp/area/nara/news/20...40605000c.html

In the proposed relocation of the Environmental Beautification Facility (環境清美工場), a trash incinerator plant in Sakyō 5-chōme, Nara City, the mayor proposed reusing the current site for Nara Prefecture’s station on the proposed Chūō Shinkansen maglev.

Given the connectivity of existing railways and major arterial roadways, the mayor explained at a City Council session on 2013.09.13 that he believed this particular location near JR Narayama Station in Sahodai 1-chōme (佐保台1) was the ideal location. Once a more detailed plan has been developed, the mayor said he would broach the issue with local residents.
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Old September 19th, 2013, 12:03 AM   #611
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JR Central reveals proposed route and station locations for maglev

On 2013.09.18, JR Central published the proposed route and location of the four intermediate stations on the Tōkyō – Nagoya section of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev. Almost 90% (86%, to be exact) of the 286 km route will be in tunnels.

FNN news report:



ANN news report:



The project description for the environmental assessment can be found here:
http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/nws001304.html

Terminal stations
Tōkyō Prefecture: Underneath Shinagawa Station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen (Minato Ward)
Aichi Prefecture: Underneath Nagoya Station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen (Nakamura Ward)

Intermediate stations
Kanagawa Prefecture: Underground; Near JR Hashimoto Station (Midori Ward, Sagamihara City)
Yamanashi Prefecture: Aboveground; Near Ōtsumachi, Kōfu City (甲府市大津町)
Nagano Prefecture: Aboveground; Near Kamisato–Iinuma, Iida City (飯田市上郷飯沼)
Gifu Prefecture: Aboveground; Near Sendan-bayashi, Nakatsugawa City (中津川市千旦林)

Railyards
Kantō area: About 50 ha near Toya, Midori Ward, Sagamihara City (相模原市緑区鳥屋)
Chūbu area: About 65 ha near Sendan-bayashi, Nakatsugawa City

Ancillary facilities
Transformer stations: 10
Maintenance bases: 8 (including storage facilities for maintenance vehicles)
Emergency exits (urban locations): 9 in Greater Tōkyō, 4 in Greater Nagoya
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Old September 19th, 2013, 12:04 AM   #612
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Alignment

Tōkyō to Yamanashi.
The Kanagawa station will be about 100 m from JR Hashimoto Station, on the site of a prefectural high school.



Shizuoka to Aichi:



Standard station cross-sections

Tōkyō (Shinagawa) Station:



Nagoya Station:



Intermediate station (aboveground):



Intermediate station (underground):



Standard structure cross-sections

Beam-style viaduct: with sound wall (left) and with noise / protection hood (right)



New-style viaduct: with sound wall (left) and with noise / protection hood (right)



Tunnel: mountain (left) and urban (right)

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Old September 19th, 2013, 12:16 AM   #613
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Shall 13 m span of double track tunnel be feasible throughout mountains, cities and underwater, or should an option of parallel single track tunnels be reserved?
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Old September 19th, 2013, 12:40 AM   #614
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Quote:
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Shall 13 m span of double track tunnel be feasible throughout mountains, cities and underwater, or should an option of parallel single track tunnels be reserved?
It's probably cheaper to choose one method and stick to it and when you have the option of twin tunnels, that increases the amount of testing and sound mitigation you have to do with twin tunnels.

Additionally, the compression wave of a smaller diameter tunnel is greater, which is probably the main reason using one larger tunnel is a better idea than twin tunnels. By using a single large tunnel for both trains, the air has more places to go as it's being displaced by the train entering the tunnel. As such, the tunnel boom will be easier to dampen, the results can be predicted more easily and noise hoods can be standard on all tunnel entrances and exits. It may even be quieter than Shinkansen tunnels which are considerably smaller. I believe the Seikan tunnel is 5.5m in diameter.

It used to be easier to do twin tunnels because of keeping the tunnel stable at large sizes but now much larger tunnels and boring machines are commonplace.

Here's some information about the Alaskan Way tunnel project through downtown Seattle, WA. http://www.scatnow.com/wsdotpdr/Reil...09-attach1.pdf There's also a couple of projects between 46' and 50' in that report (14 m - 15.25 m). By comparison, the Chuo line will be 13 m (~42'). I don't think 13 m will be problem, though that is a large diameter tunnel.

Last edited by bluemeansgo; September 19th, 2013 at 12:53 AM.
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Old September 19th, 2013, 05:04 AM   #615
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Exciting developments. I am not following this thread very closely, sorry if this was asked before. What was planned regular operation date for the line?
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Old September 19th, 2013, 08:46 AM   #616
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Officially, 2027.... however some suspect that they will open up a portion of the line in time for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo
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Old September 19th, 2013, 08:55 AM   #617
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
Officially, 2027.... however some suspect that they will open up a portion of the line in time for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=608

*to add: this was all over the national news yesterday, being the top story on both NHK TV and the commercial newscasts. One report stated that one of the reasons JR Tokai decided to go to full private funding of the Chuo Maglev (in 2007 I think) was to prevent or at least minimize political meddling and uncertainty over funding. You can see this also in JR Tokai's efforts to build a HSR line in Texas, which is a wise move in the U.S., at least.

Last edited by k.k.jetcar; September 19th, 2013 at 09:02 AM.
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Old September 20th, 2013, 04:46 AM   #618
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
Officially, 2027.... however some suspect that they will open up a portion of the line in time for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo
Business wise I don't think so since opening a half developed line to meet the Olympic games means it requires to purchase the vast amount of train sets as well as recieve the constructed stations at Hashimoto as well as Yamanashi and register them as asset which will be object of corporate tax for which will mostly not be used for the following seven years until the actual partial inuaguration between Shinagawa and Nagoya.
As a publicly listed company, JR Central does need to answer to her stock owners in a responsible manner.
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Old September 20th, 2013, 06:50 PM   #619
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@SamuraiBlue: One of the first things they teach you in Accounting is that accounting should never drive your business decisions.

Anyway, building that line until 2027 is already a very aggressive schedule, even at Japanese levels of project management. It's impossible to do in half time.
Their first hurdle will be land acquisition. Unlike China, where entire villages are relocated in weeks, a single landowner can throw back projects by decades (see the MacArthur road in Tokyo). I've been to Hashimoto earlier this month - nothing has started yet.

Also, let's not forget that this is the first time that a maglev is built on that scale, even though the tech has been around for years. I'd rather have them take their time to make sure it's fully tested and no corners are cut.

Another constraint they'll face is that everyone will now try to rush their construction projects in Japan until 2020 - hotels, sports facilities, transport infrastructure, tourism ... Japan is about to enter another construction bubble, there will be a limit of available manpower. (Hopefully this will mean a temporary stop on useless dams, village concert halls, regional airports etc. ... ah well, the neverending Japanese pork barrels)
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Old September 20th, 2013, 07:10 PM   #620
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Im sorry if this has beed discussed before, but are there windows for the driver/attendant or a forward facing camera and video screen to see what is ahead? I don't see any windows in the front.
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