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Old December 29th, 2013, 11:31 AM   #661
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Groundbreaking on maglev construction could take place in autumn 2014
リニア来秋にも着工 JR東海「認可得られ次第、早く」

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/news/1...6270014-n1.htm

On 2013.12.29, it was revealed that JR Central is looking to break ground on construction of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev, scheduled to open in 2027 between Tōkyō and Nagoya, as early as autumn 2014. JR Central has indicated that it plans to file for approvals for the maglev’s construction implementation plan with the national government in summer 2014, with work beginning in earnest before FY2014 close.

The railway hopes to begin construction as soon as it receives the necessary approvals from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), but coordination with the national government and local jurisdictions along the alignment could delay groundbreaking past autumn 2014. As construction of the maglev will take place over a wide area, work is expected to proceed on multiple sections simultaneously.

The railway published the details of the new maglev stations and alignment in September of this year, and has since been holding informational workshops in municipalities along the line as part of the environmental impact assessment process.



===

Of course, this is the remainder of the first phase to Nagoya… The initial test track segment and the extension that opened recently will be incorporated into the alignment. The Tōkaidō Shinkansen will be celebrating its 50th anniversary next year, so a 2014 groundbreaking for the maglev is fitting.

They are still doing testing with the L0 series (2013.12.03):

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Old December 29th, 2013, 11:40 AM   #662
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Well this is some good news, the only problem was that I needed 30 min to accommodate with the 300 km/h speed not sure how I would feel about 500 km/h
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Old December 29th, 2013, 02:45 PM   #663
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Originally Posted by giovani kun View Post
Well this is some good news, the only problem was that I needed 30 min to accommodate with the 300 km/h speed not sure how I would feel about 500 km/h
It wouldn't be an open train, so you wouldn't need to accommodate.
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Old January 8th, 2014, 05:23 AM   #664
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Japan will offer ¥500 billion in loans for U.S. maglev project
http://ajw.asahi.com/article/economy/AJ201401060057

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Japan plans to offer 500 billion yen ($4.79 billion) in loans to the United States as part of a push to export its high-speed magnetic levitation train system, which could transport commuters between Washington and Baltimore in only 15 minutes, sources said.

Using Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Tokai)’s maglev technology, the U.S. government is considering constructing a 60-kilometer rail track to connect the two major East Coast cities.

If the planned track is completed, the time needed to traverse the highly traveled corridor would be sharply reduced from the current 1 hour by commuter rail to 15 minutes.

The Japanese side has told Washington that it intends to offer half the amount of construction costs in loans through the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, so that it can help the United States introduce the maglev, sources said. The maglev technology uses magnetic repellence to lift the train above the tracks, eliminating friction and allowing it to travel at a high rate of speed.

While the two nations’ governments have estimated total construction costs at about $8 billion (834.32 billion yen), Tokyo estimates that the final tab will be around 1 trillion yen, taking into account fluctuations in the exchange rate. That would mean that Japan's share of the project costs is about 500 billion yen.

The United States is also weighing eventually building a 730-km maglev track linking Boston and Washington.

At a Japan-U.S. summit last February, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told U.S. President Barack Obama that Japan was prepared to offer its maglev train technologies.

“I want to propose that (the United States) introduce the maglev train system to represent Japan-U.S. cooperation,” Abe said at the meeting.

Obama reportedly showed interest in utilizing Japan’s maglev technology.

As Abe travels around the world to promote the export of his country’s infrastructure technology, the latest proposal for extending a loan to the United States is part of such efforts.

JR Tokai has been working with the U.S. sales promotion company The Northeast Maglev (TNEM), which has exclusive rights to help sell JR Tokai’s maglev technologies in the United States, to call on state governments to allow the construction of maglev railway lines.

But JR Tokai and TNEM have so far not concluded any agreements with local governments to begin laying tracks for maglev trains. It remains unclear on what routes the trains will run and when commercial operations will begin, as well.

Whether the latest plan to extend the 500 billion yen in loans will be actualized depends on if the Japanese government and the two companies are able to reach an agreement with regional governments.



The L0 series maglev Shinkansen train during a test run on the Yamanashi Maglev Test Track on Aug. 29 (Asahi Shimbun file photo)

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Old January 8th, 2014, 12:14 PM   #665
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50% is quite a large carrot, but I don't think it's enough.
The US love air travel so much.
I remember the Obama government issued a grant that would have paid for 50% of a HSR project in the state of Floria, however the state of Florida gave the money back to the federal government.
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Old January 8th, 2014, 09:07 PM   #666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hegemonic View Post
50% is quite a large carrot, but I don't think it's enough. The US love air travel so much. I remember the Obama government issued a grant that would have paid for 50% of a HSR project in the state of Floria, however the state of Florida gave the money back to the federal government.
No one "loves" air travel...lol
Florida rejected the funds to make a political statement.
I do think it's a mistake to export the maglev technology rather than just work to export signaling systems and rolling stock for a traditional hsr system, but we'll see how this goes.
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Old January 8th, 2014, 10:36 PM   #667
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JR Central's maglev is substantially faster than any existing steel-wheel HSR technologies... When you consider the absurd cost estimates from Amtrak's Northeast Corridor plans ($150 billion for a steel-wheel HSR implementation), it really doesn't look so bad, even if the $150 billion includes some additional benefits to the local / commuter systems.
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Old January 8th, 2014, 10:53 PM   #668
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
JR Central's maglev is substantially faster than any existing steel-wheel HSR technologies... When you consider the absurd cost estimates from Amtrak's Northeast Corridor plans ($150 billion for a steel-wheel HSR implementation), it really doesn't look so bad, even if the $150 billion includes some additional benefits to the local / commuter systems.
150 is for multiple routes not just the NEC...were talking 5,000 miles total in upgrades and expansions.
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Old January 9th, 2014, 12:29 AM   #669
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Like I said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
...even if the $150 billion includes some additional benefits to the local / commuter systems.
If you are not happy with me quoting the $150 billion, then you can take the $110 billion for the second phase of the NEC plan (NextGen HSR), which is the dedicated HSR tracks, plus the $7 billion in HSR rolling stock and whatever share of the Gateway Program and other upgrades to the existing corridor you want to assume would benefit the NextGen HSR phase:
http://www.amtrak.com/ccurl/453/325/...t-Corridor.pdf

Anyways, my intention is not to debate the Northeast Corridor ad nauseum (that circus can stay in the U.S. thread), but to say that just as there are tangible merits behind a traditional HSR implementation based on steel-wheel rail that allows for integration with existing lines, there are also tangible merits behind a "start-from-scratch" approach like the TNEM proposal that doesn't have to worry about all the extra baggage of legacy infrastructure... This was the approach taken by Japan when it built the Tōkaidō Shinkansen, although the difference there was not maglev vs. steel wheel but standard gauge vs. narrow gauge. It is also the approach being taken the second time around, with JR Central going for an entirely new alignment and technology with the Chūō Shinkansen instead of upgrading the existing line or building a new standard steel-wheel Shinkansen line on a new alignment.
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Old January 9th, 2014, 02:35 AM   #670
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
...there are tangible merits behind a traditional HSR implementation based on steel-wheel rail that allows for integration with existing lines, there are also tangible merits behind a "start-from-scratch" approach like the TNEM proposal that doesn't have to worry about all the extra baggage of legacy infrastructure...
My only worry, is whether they can build a coalition of support behind the project. What I'm afraid of, is that a DC-Baltimore segment would be either shot down entirely, or built and subsequently derided as too expensive (i.e. a boondoggle).

Isn't there a more attractive alternative (for both parties) to loan guarantees that would allow them to build something a bit more substantial - even if it were on the same time frame, it would do a lot more for confidence to be able to convincingly indicate efforts to build a DC - Philadelphia line.

I don't necessarily think it's absurd to begin with a DC-Baltimore line, but just look at what the perception is in California given they've chosen to being in the Central Valley. People are a bit dense about this stuff...I just feel like they're not really thinking about the messaging here.
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Old January 15th, 2014, 02:34 AM   #671
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JR Central may open Yamanashi maglev station in time for 2020 Olympics
リニア山梨県駅、東京五輪前に 体験乗車に道 JR東海が検討

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNAS...A1TJC000/?dg=1

While JR Central plans to open the Chūō Shinkansen maglev between Tōkyō’s Shinagawa and Nagoya in 2027, the railway has begun investigations into opening the new station for Yamanashi Prefecture in time for the 2020 Summer Olympics to be held in the nation’s capital. JR Central would extend the existing 43 km maglev test track to the new stations, making it possible to operate test rides for tourists and other visitors during the Olympics, with terminals at the new Yamanashi station and the maglev test center in Tsuru City (都留市).

The railway plans to begin construction of the new maglev line some time in FY2014. However, 86% of the 286 km alignment between Shinagawa and Nagoya will be in tunnels, and the JR Central president Yamada Yoshiomi says that accelerating the construction schedule is extremely difficult.

The railway will begin paid test rides on the maglev open to some members of the public starting in FY2014 using the existing test track in Yamanashi. In order to open the new Yamanashi maglev station in time for Olympics, JR Central would need to complete a 7 km extension of the track west to the site of the proposed station.

Currently, passengers can only board and alight at the test center, but allowing passengers to get off from either end is expected to triple the daily ridership to about 1,000 passengers. The railway hopes to offer 500 km/h test rides to the public, helping to expand understanding of and interest in Japan’s maglev technology.

While the railway admits that there are some difficulties to realizing this plan, particularly with regards to land acquisition, JR Central says it’s entirely feasible to open the Yamanashi station early to take advantage of the increased visitor numbers coming for the 2020 Olympics.

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Old January 15th, 2014, 10:18 PM   #672
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This sounds exciting.

I went to the Tsuru City test/Exhibition centre lasts May while the maglev train wasn't operational and I was surprised to see the amount of people that were stopping by for a look.

It is rather hard for people to find the test track from the local Tsuru train station so better access may encourage more people.
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Old January 15th, 2014, 11:38 PM   #673
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It is possible to reach 800 km/h Topspeed with MAGLEV Technology ?
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Old January 15th, 2014, 11:56 PM   #674
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Theoretically, it's only limited by how fast they can alternate the coils
However, in the real world they have things like air resistance and track curvature to deal with, though it'd be interesting to see what happens when they gun it on a track long enough to support accelerating and decelerating to 581 kmh +
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Old January 16th, 2014, 02:50 AM   #675
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590 was the fastest unmanned records, isn't it?
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Old January 16th, 2014, 06:43 AM   #676
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For sure, I think we can expect that the revenue-service top speed will eventually increase after the line opens, perhaps even as early as the second generation of revenue trainsets... This is a comparatively new technology, so there's still plenty of room for improvements in power and efficiency. About 10 years ago, the president of JR Central was quoted as saying that the eventual target maximum speed was 700 km/h.

But JR Central is still a business, so for now, they are mostly focused on getting the line built and operational as soon as possible at a speed they feel comfortable with—in this case, that is 505 km/h. I wouldn’t be surprised, though, if we see them try to push the speed record into the 600 km/h range once they’ve finished all the necessary distance testing of the L0 series prototype and have finalized all the basic details in preparation for eventual mass production… For the line to open in 2027, they would probably need to finalize the rolling stock design by 2024 at the latest, which is plenty of time. The limited length of the test track (18 km, originally) probably limited their ability to safely test the upper limits of the speed range, but with more than twice the distance now, they should have quite a bit more leeway.
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Old January 16th, 2014, 09:56 AM   #677
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
For sure, I think we can expect that the revenue-service top speed will eventually increase after the line opens, perhaps even as early as the second generation of revenue trainsets... This is a comparatively new technology, so there's still plenty of room for improvements in power and efficiency. About 10 years ago, the president of JR Central was quoted as saying that the eventual target maximum speed was 700 km/h.

But JR Central is still a business, so for now, they are mostly focused on getting the line built and operational as soon as possible at a speed they feel comfortable with—in this case, that is 505 km/h. I wouldn’t be surprised, though, if we see them try to push the speed record into the 600 km/h range once they’ve finished all the necessary distance testing of the L0 series prototype and have finalized all the basic details in preparation for eventual mass production… For the line to open in 2027, they would probably need to finalize the rolling stock design by 2024 at the latest, which is plenty of time. The limited length of the test track (18 km, originally) probably limited their ability to safely test the upper limits of the speed range, but with more than twice the distance now, they should have quite a bit more leeway.
It's not the trainset that is the decisive component for max speed, it's the frequency converter which regulates the electricty to the power coils which is located at each power supply stations along the tracks.
If they change that they can speed up the trains easily.
At the moment I heard max speed of 581 Km/h was reached with 60Hz and I do not know the max limit for the present converters but obtaining perfect sine curves while placing large power loads is a tricky matter in heavy electric components.
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Old January 16th, 2014, 12:30 PM   #678
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Do you think the operating speed when the line opens in 14 years will be higher than 505km/h?

I think in the next 14 years there could be some tech improvements or breakthroughs.
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Old January 16th, 2014, 02:04 PM   #679
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hegemonic View Post
Do you think the operating speed when the line opens in 14 years will be higher than 505km/h?

I think in the next 14 years there could be some tech improvements or breakthroughs.
First for commercial operation I believe JR places a safety buffer of 25%. Another is quality of the ride in which JRC will no doubt try to improve. This is done through;
1. Better synchronization between one frequency converter to another
2. Optimization of aerodynamics of the trainsets.

Finally JRC will no doubt continue research on overall better power efficiency.

These would probably be higher in priority then just speed since they will ultimately be required if they are going to provide the same riding experience at higher speeds at the same price.
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Old February 20th, 2014, 04:34 AM   #680
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Maybe old news, I don't know.


JR Tokai may open new maglev train station in Yamanashi before ’20 Olympics

NAGOYA – Central Japan Railway Co. is considering opening a new station for its magnetically levitated trains in Kofu, Yamanashi Prefecture, ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, according to a source.

JR Tokai, the railway serving central Japan, aims to showcase its technology to a worldwide audience by offering foreign passengers the chance to experience journeys at a maximum speed of 500 kph on the Chuo Shinkansen Line.

At present, JR Tokai is running experimental trains on a test line stretching around 43 km in Yamanashi Prefecture.

The company plans to extend the existing test line by about 6 km to run the trains, the source said, adding that passengers would then be able to get on and off the trains between the new station and the maglev train experiment facility in Tsuru, Yamanashi Prefecture.
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