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Old October 17th, 2014, 06:22 PM   #741
2co2co
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It seems I didn't win the lottery for Maglev test ride 1 in 125 competition was too much :-S
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Old October 19th, 2014, 06:30 PM   #742
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Japan was the first country to operate a highspeed line with highspeed trains.

Now with the Maglev Project a more advanced,efficient and faster technology will be introduced by Japan again ( a new stepstone will be established )

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Old October 20th, 2014, 01:33 AM   #743
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Is it more efficient?

Any idea about the energy use per passenger?
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Old October 20th, 2014, 09:54 PM   #744
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it doesn't have to be, if we win more time we get more money
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Old October 20th, 2014, 10:05 PM   #745
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giovani kun View Post
it doesn't have to be, if we win more time we get more money
The other competitor is plane.
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Old October 20th, 2014, 11:14 PM   #746
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Yes, but in this case only on price not speed.
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Old October 20th, 2014, 11:58 PM   #747
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Time matters.
In Tokyo, Chuo Shinkansen cannot reach Tokyo and terminates at Shinagawa.
Where does Chuo Shinkansen get in Osaka?
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Old October 21st, 2014, 01:48 AM   #748
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giovani kun View Post
it doesn't have to be, if we win more time we get more money
Yeah, I was just responding to a poster who'd claimed the maglev was "faster and more efficient". Honest question - is it more efficient energy-wise?
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Old October 21st, 2014, 09:40 AM   #749
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaeguDuke View Post
Yeah, I was just responding to a poster who'd claimed the maglev was "faster and more efficient". Honest question - is it more efficient energy-wise?
The numbers that I have seen show the maglev as just as efficient or more efficient then a steel wheels on rails train. One of the key advantages will actually be its speed. Because it will travel at 500 Kilometers per hour, fewer trainsets will be required. To put it another way, one train said will be able to take two times as many passengers as a Nozomi Shinkansen in the same amount of time. For the same reason the sleeper services on JR are being discontinued in favor of high-speed rail, the maglev could end up being less expensive to run.

There will also be very little friction on the rails, no catenary wires to maintain, and very few moving parts on the train itself. In Vancouver, we have a linear induction powered metro system called skytrain. One of the advantages of the system is the low cost of maintenance due to so few moving engine parts. Japan has been testing magnetic levitation since the early 70s. Although there will be risks putting new technology into production, the tokaido line is at capacity and an alternative is required.
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Old October 21st, 2014, 10:10 AM   #750
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
The numbers that I have seen show the maglev as just as efficient or more efficient then a steel wheels on rails train. One of the key advantages will actually be its speed. Because it will travel at 500 Kilometers per hour, fewer trainsets will be required. To put it another way, one train said will be able to take two times as many passengers as a Nozomi Shinkansen in the same amount of time.
How do the loading gauges compare?
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Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
Although there will be risks putting new technology into production, the tokaido line is at capacity and an alternative is required.
Yes, but an alternative would have been more old technology.
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Old October 21st, 2014, 08:44 PM   #751
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Time matters.
In Tokyo, Chuo Shinkansen cannot reach Tokyo and terminates at Shinagawa.
Where does Chuo Shinkansen get in Osaka?
Correct. It will not initially reach "Tokyo Station" but it will still reach central "Tokyo" (anything inside the Yamanote Line).



JR Central is wise to limit their costs here as that part of the project will likely some of the most expensive.

Shinagawa isn't exactly a minor station, mind you:

It connects with the JR Yamanote Line, the Tokaido Shinkansen, the Keikyu Main Line to Kawasaki, Yokohama (17 minutes) and Uraga, the Keikyu Airport Line to Haneda Airport (14 minutes), the Keihin Tohoku Line to Ueno Station and Omiya (47 minutes), the Yokosuka Line with trains to Chiba and Narita Airport, Kamakura, Yokosuka and the Narita Express rapid service to Tokyo's main international airport (67 minutes).

Source: http://www.japanvisitor.com/japan-ci...nagawa-station
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Old October 21st, 2014, 11:18 PM   #752
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And how long does it take then to get from Shinagawa station to the very centre of Tokyo? Tickets on this service will probably be significantly more expensive than on still very fast Tokaido Shinkansen and thus will appeal mostly businessmen for whom time is the most important factor.
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Old October 21st, 2014, 11:39 PM   #753
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So suppose that you are on Nozomi 2 in Nagoya Station at 9:32, 2027. Your ass and luggage have been settled in a seat since the departure from Hakata at 6:05, or from Osaka at 8:37.
You can stay in the seat till arrival at Tokyo Station, 11:13 - 101 minutes after Nagoya.

Alternatively, you might get off at Nagoya Station and start waiting for a maglev. When it comes, it might be one that stops at Nakatsugawa, Iida, Kofu and Hashimoto Stations.
When you finally have waited for an express Chuo Shinkansen, you will arrive at Shinagawa in 40 minutes. Which would be 61 minutes faster than the Nozomi... but remember that you spent time waiting for the express maglev at Nagoya station. And you are still at Shinagawa! Nozomi 2 reaches Shinagawa, too, but it is there already at 11:06 - 94 minutes after Nagoya. So the saving of express maglev was 54 minutes.

And you are still at Shinagawa with maglev. Meaning that you have to uproot your ass and luggage again and make a second connection to reach Tokyo.

Thus, the net effect is 54 minutes MINUS time lost waiting for two connections out of trip time that is still 4+ hours from Hakata after these under 54 minutes saving, and that with the inconvenience of two connections.

If you happen to arrive for a non-express maglev, exactly what is the trip time Nagoya-Shinagawa with the 4 intermediate stops enumerated?
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Old October 21st, 2014, 11:48 PM   #754
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How about you are in Nagoya already and want to go from there to Tokyo? Unbeatable by any other means of transport save perhaps a private plane. For travellers from Osaka not as convenient until the line is extended to that city.
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Old October 22nd, 2014, 05:56 AM   #755
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Quote:
You can stay in the seat till arrival at Tokyo Station, 11:13 - 101 minutes after Nagoya.
As long as the Nozomi still runs within 101 minutes to Tokyo after the Maglev is open. JR Tokai may decide to add more stops along the way, or terminate trains at Nagoya. They want you to use the Maglev after all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
And you are still at Shinagawa with maglev. Meaning that you have to uproot your ass and luggage again and make a second connection to reach Tokyo.
The primary target for the Maglev are not tourists (which wouldn't carry along large amounts of baggage anyway, they'd use baggage delivery service by kuroneko yamato) but business people. Not everybody wants to go to Tokyo station. Shinjuku, Yokohama, Nihonbashi, Ôtemachi, Nagatacho, the Bayside - can be reached within acceptable time.

Also, I don't think Hakata - Shinagawa via the Maglev will be very popular. Too expensive if you compare prices to plane tickets, and the airports of Fukuoka and Haneda are not so far from the city center.

And you can live in Osaka and commute to Tokyo for work. Hooray for commuter hell
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Old October 22nd, 2014, 10:37 AM   #756
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This debate is quite absurd...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
And how long does it take then to get from Shinagawa station to the very centre of Tokyo? Tickets on this service will probably be significantly more expensive than on still very fast Tokaido Shinkansen and thus will appeal mostly businessmen for whom time is the most important factor.
What you understand by "the very centre of Tokyo"? Ikebukuro? Shinjuku? Shibuya? Ebisu? Meguro? Hamamatsucho? Shimbashi? Yurakucho? Kanda? Ginza? Akihabara? Yotsuya? Akasaka? Roppongi? both are "centres of Tokyo".

If you are a businessman and your office is in Shinjuku, to take the Shinkansen, first you will move to Tokyo Station or Shinagawa Station from your local station using Subway or Commuter trains.

It's to talk from an european point of view about the "city centre" of Tokyo or other big cities in Japan and east-Asia.
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Last edited by Sr.Horn; October 22nd, 2014 at 11:06 AM.
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Old October 22nd, 2014, 11:03 AM   #757
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Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
How about you are in Nagoya already and want to go from there to Tokyo?
Does not look like there are that many. There is a single Nozomi and two Hikaris Nagoya-Tokyo - all of them early in the morning, before the first Nozomi from Osaka comes. After that, just Kodamas - 1 per hour, out of the 10 hour of Kodamas, Hikaris and Nozomis combined.
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Old October 22nd, 2014, 11:13 AM   #758
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Just because there are many different "centres" of Tokyo doesn't mean that you can't put a dot in the middle and call it the centre. Right or wrong he is correct in that it is fair from the geographical centre of Greater Tokyo meaning that if a businessman is working in many of the places you mentioned it would take significantly longer to get from Shinagawa than from Tokyo Station (bad example as it only has one subway line). Ideally actually you would want the maglev to stop someplace roughly in the middle of the centres you mentioned with good transportation links to all. Impossible in reality and ridiculously expensive (which is why it isn't stopping at Tokyo Station or at a huge super complex at Otemachi). If I remember the way the subways work in Tokyo Shinagawa is not technically a mainline subway stop but instead a suburban extension with through running onto the Asakusa line although there is the main train line there too. Connection-wise almost any transfer station in Tokyo could offer better connections to the places you mentioned.

Also, I think people shouldn't underestimate how many people will actually pay less and travel for a bit longer if they can just sit in one seat and not move their luggage. If I had an option of subway to train to maglev to train to subway or subway to train to subway I'd take the latter if it wasn't significantly slower
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Old October 22nd, 2014, 11:36 AM   #759
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The map is quite false. All Narita Express trains arrives at Shinagawa Station (add 7 minutes). From Haneda Airport u can use Keikyu trains direct to Shinagawa.

I understand if you means, OK Shinagawa is not a touristic centre of Tokyo, but Shinagawa is one of the main business centres of Tokyo. Moreover, if you are using the Narita Express and want to connect to the Shinkansen, is more convenient to use Shinagawa than Tokyo.





You know why? Guess the differences:





Yes, the Narita Express platform and the Shinkansen platforms at Shinagawa Station are adjacent while in Tokyo Station, the Narita Express stops five stories below ground level.
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Old October 22nd, 2014, 11:51 AM   #760
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Where in Shinagawa Station is Chuo Shinkansen passenger platforms built?

And since it is a terminal station, is a maglev depot also needed at Shinagawa?
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