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Old December 29th, 2007, 09:20 AM   #61
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it's going to be pretty cool.. while there figuring out how to make those bullet trains or w/e they are faster and more suitable, we're still trying to figure out why americans wont use public transit!!
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Old December 29th, 2007, 11:09 AM   #62
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I've always wandered if the Japanese version is a viable one. Superconductors are still tricky business and cost loads of energy to get them superconducting. On the other hand, if it gets to work it be darn impressive. Hopefully this line is going to show how it will work in the 'real world' But knowing Japanese precision and dedication for such jobs it's likely going to be impressive.
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Old December 29th, 2007, 01:09 PM   #63
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Japan plans world's fastest maglev train
Posted: 26 December 2007 1649 hrs

TOKYO : A Japanese rail operator said Wednesday it plans to introduce the world's fastest train in the next two decades, a next-generation maglev built at a cost of 45 billion dollars.

"Maglev," or magnetically levitated, trains travel above ground through an electromagnetic pull. The only maglev train now in commercial operation is in Shanghai.

Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Central) plans to build a maglev linear-motor train between Tokyo and central Japan at a cost of 5.1 trillion yen (44.7 billion dollars) by the 2025 financial year, a company spokesman said.

"It will be the fastest train ever -- if it beats the one in Shanghai -- with a velocity of about 500 kilometres (310 miles) per hour, travelling a distance of 290 kilometres," he said.

The Shanghai train, launched in 2002, travels at 430 kph for the 30.5 kilometre run from Pudong airport to the financial district, according to the Shanghai Maglev Transportation Development Co.'s website.

JR Central's magnetic-levitated train hit 581 kph in 2003 in a trial run on a test course in Japan's central Yamanashi prefecture, the spokesman said.

The maglev train would enter service at a time when Japan looks for a successor to its famed "Shinkansen" bullet trains, which were first rolled out to the world's awe for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

Japan's fasted train remains the Sanyo Shinkansen run by JR West in western Japan, which travels at 300 kph.

The world's fastest train using conventional railway technology is currently France's TGV, which runs at 320 kph.

While the JR Central did not specify the exact location for the maglev, the company in its last annual earnings report wrote of a "first phase" between Tokyo and the central industrial hub of Nagoya.

JR Central said at the time it envisioned eventually building a second phase to link Nagoya with Japan's second city of Osaka.

The company's board approved the plan this week and estimated that it would leave the company with a five trillion debt when the train goes into service in the financial year to March 2026.

The firm projects the train will bring in five percent additional revenue in the first year, shrinking JR Central's debt to the current level within eight years of operation, a statement said.

JR Central initially had waited on the plan in hopes of government subsidies.

"The reason why the plan has not moved even a bit is because the government isn't able to bankroll it," JR Central president Masayuki Matsumoto said, as quoted by the Nikkei business daily.

Market players were less convinced.

JR Central shares on the Tokyo Stock Exchange plummeted 100,000 yen or 8.85 percent to 1.03 million yen, despite a gain of 0.65 percent on the benchmark Nikkei-225 index.

A series of other maglev projects are being planned around the world.

Bavaria, Germany's richest state, said in September that it would build the country's first commercial maglev train line by 2014, connecting Munich with its airport 37 kilometres (23 miles) away.

The approval of the maglev, made by engineering groups Siemens and ThyssenKrupp, came despite a test last year in which it crashed into a parked maintenance vehicle, killing 23 people.

China has planned to extend is maglev from Shanghai to Hangzhou, 170 kilometres (105 miles) away, by 2010, although state media reports this year said the project could be delayed or cancelled.

The United States has also been studying locations to build its first commercial maglev service, with one proposal to construct a line between Washington and Baltimore.

- AFP /ls
Copyright © 2007 MCN International Pte Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
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Old December 29th, 2007, 02:10 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
The only maglev train now in commercial operation is in Shanghai.
FALSE ALREADY!!!
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Old December 29th, 2007, 05:56 PM   #65
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very badly written article, mistakes all over the place.
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Old December 29th, 2007, 06:17 PM   #66
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I don't know the distance from Tokyo to Osaka in kilometres, but $45,000,000,000 is a very high price for a train connecting the two cities. You'd be wasting a whole lot of Yen on this project.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 12:33 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
You'd be wasting a whole lot of Yen on this project.
It's one of the most profitable railway corridors in the world
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Old December 30th, 2007, 01:19 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRZ View Post
It's one of the most profitable railway corridors in the world
It's probably one of the most difficult to negotiate terrains for HST, cutting through several mountain ranges boring dozen or so tunnels just to get to Nagoya.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 02:02 AM   #69
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there is one simple little number, that tells us how profitable the whole thing will be:

JR Central wants to build it with its own money (!) and aims to have reduced its debts after 8 years already to a level that they had before construction.

Once the line is finished, it will be a huge money making machine for JR Central.

And investing 45 bln into a high tech project can never be bad for a high tech nation btw...

Last edited by pflo777; December 30th, 2007 at 05:00 AM.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 02:22 AM   #70
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I highly doubt this news. How can japan afford so much money when it's not growing at all and with no resources either? And what about news, are there any pics to support construction has begun?
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Old December 30th, 2007, 04:36 AM   #71
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Exactly because of that fact. Money is cheap as hell there. 0% interest rates mean that investing in ridiculous, over the top schemes like this are attractive.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 05:01 AM   #72
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Technically, it's 0.5%.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pflo777 View Post
First thing I thought about when looking at this pic, was toothpaste.

Anyway, I doubt that this would be built, or at best, the project will be scaled back somewhat.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 05:12 AM   #73
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Official PDF from JR Central that says, that they will push for that project, and definately want to build it ( with their own money)

Official press release


it seems, they really want to go for this
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Old December 30th, 2007, 05:22 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltmeister View Post
I highly doubt this news. How can japan afford so much money when it's not growing at all and with no resources either? And what about news, are there any pics to support construction has begun?
The project will pay for itself.

The original Toukaidou Shinaksen paid off its capital debt in full in less than 5 years of operations. It was phenomenal.

That opened in 1964. Less people then. Less expectations too (a significant portion of the population was very skeptical of the Shinkansen while it was under construction, and thought, like you, that it would be a money pit).

JR Toukai can swing this.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 09:55 AM   #75
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The only thing i can post in a thread like this is:

I think that sums up this idea.
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Old December 31st, 2007, 07:05 AM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
Japan plans world's fastest maglev train
Posted: 26 December 2007 1649 hrs

TOKYO : A Japanese rail operator said Wednesday it plans to introduce the world's fastest train in the next two decades, a next-generation maglev built at a cost of 45 billion dollars.

"Maglev," or magnetically levitated, trains travel above ground through an electromagnetic pull. The only maglev train now in commercial operation is in Shanghai.

Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Central) plans to build a maglev linear-motor train between Tokyo and central Japan at a cost of 5.1 trillion yen (44.7 billion dollars) by the 2025 financial year, a company spokesman said.

"It will be the fastest train ever -- if it beats the one in Shanghai -- with a velocity of about 500 kilometres (310 miles) per hour, travelling a distance of 290 kilometres," he said.

The Shanghai train, launched in 2002, travels at 430 kph for the 30.5 kilometre run from Pudong airport to the financial district, according to the Shanghai Maglev Transportation Development Co.'s website.

JR Central's magnetic-levitated train hit 581 kph in 2003 in a trial run on a test course in Japan's central Yamanashi prefecture, the spokesman said.

The maglev train would enter service at a time when Japan looks for a successor to its famed "Shinkansen" bullet trains, which were first rolled out to the world's awe for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

Japan's fasted train remains the Sanyo Shinkansen run by JR West in western Japan, which travels at 300 kph.

The world's fastest train using conventional railway technology is currently France's TGV, which runs at 320 kph.

While the JR Central did not specify the exact location for the maglev, the company in its last annual earnings report wrote of a "first phase" between Tokyo and the central industrial hub of Nagoya.

JR Central said at the time it envisioned eventually building a second phase to link Nagoya with Japan's second city of Osaka.

The company's board approved the plan this week and estimated that it would leave the company with a five trillion debt when the train goes into service in the financial year to March 2026.

The firm projects the train will bring in five percent additional revenue in the first year, shrinking JR Central's debt to the current level within eight years of operation, a statement said.

JR Central initially had waited on the plan in hopes of government subsidies.

"The reason why the plan has not moved even a bit is because the government isn't able to bankroll it," JR Central president Masayuki Matsumoto said, as quoted by the Nikkei business daily.

Market players were less convinced.

JR Central shares on the Tokyo Stock Exchange plummeted 100,000 yen or 8.85 percent to 1.03 million yen, despite a gain of 0.65 percent on the benchmark Nikkei-225 index.

A series of other maglev projects are being planned around the world.

Bavaria, Germany's richest state, said in September that it would build the country's first commercial maglev train line by 2014, connecting Munich with its airport 37 kilometres (23 miles) away.

The approval of the maglev, made by engineering groups Siemens and ThyssenKrupp, came despite a test last year in which it crashed into a parked maintenance vehicle, killing 23 people.

China has planned to extend is maglev from Shanghai to Hangzhou, 170 kilometres (105 miles) away, by 2010, although state media reports this year said the project could be delayed or cancelled.

The United States has also been studying locations to build its first commercial maglev service, with one proposal to construct a line between Washington and Baltimore.

- AFP /ls
Copyright © 2007 MCN International Pte Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
I didn't realise the bullet train was that old. 1964, wow, must've been amazing when they were first rolled out.
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Old January 2nd, 2008, 11:24 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TU 'cane View Post
it's going to be pretty cool.. while there figuring out how to make those bullet trains or w/e they are faster and more suitable, we're still trying to figure out why americans wont use public transit!!
We figured that out fifty years ago. It's because we give Americans free highways.
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Old April 5th, 2008, 08:59 PM   #78
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MagLev Trains!?

Hi!

It's not really about new developments in terms of Maglev trains but rather a really important technical question.

My term paper in Contemporary Physics is about Superconductivity and I have to talk about the applications of superconductivity/superconductors in magnetically levitated trains (Maglev trains).

Now, my question: Are superconductors only used in EDS (Electrodynamic Suspension -- like the one built by the Japanese) or are they ALSO USED in EMS (Electromagnetic Suspension -- like the one operating in Shanghai and the technology built by TransRapid)?

Thank you a lot!
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Old April 7th, 2008, 11:46 AM   #79
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as far as I know, they are only used in EDS Systems.

I mean, how do you want to regulate a superconductive magnet once it floats in the right position?

Look up IWF-Dresden, they are are also doing research on that field, also considering superconductive magnets....
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Old April 20th, 2008, 06:48 AM   #80
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Just a question. The second video talks about "rotated magnets on the side of the train". What does he mean by that?
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