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Old October 24th, 2014, 02:58 AM   #781
bluemeansgo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wee.tanuki View Post
And there are plenty of projects that are ongoing (Tokyo-Ueno Line for example) that will make Shinagawa even more connected by the time the Chuo Shinkansen gets built.
Interesting. Looks like this is scheduled to open up March of next year with through service to Shinagawa on the Utsunomiya Line. Giving better access for places as far north as Saitama to both the Tokaido AND eventually the Chuo Line.

Does anyone have any information on future connections from the Keisei line? Will they extend the Skyliner south? I remember seeing somewhere that they could potentially have a direct connection from Narita to Haneda, which could mean a stop at Shinagawa as well.
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Old October 24th, 2014, 09:26 AM   #782
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Not exactly the same technology, but yes, the age of hover is finally coming!!

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I rode a hoverboard designed to save buildings from earthquakes and floods
Hendo is a $10,000 hoverboard that wants to change the world
http://www.theverge.com/2014/10/21/7...eal-hoverboard
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Old October 24th, 2014, 05:36 PM   #783
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
Does anyone have any information on future connections from the Keisei line? Will they extend the Skyliner south? I remember seeing somewhere that they could potentially have a direct connection from Narita to Haneda, which could mean a stop at Shinagawa as well.
A direct service with a stop at Shinagawa already exists via the Keikyu Main Line (Haneda - Sengakuji), the Toei Asakusa Line (Sengakuji - Oshiage), The Keisei Oshiage Line (Oshiage - Aoto) and the Keisei Main Line (Aoto - Narita Ap.). Takes 93 minutes, the fare is 1800 Yen.
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Old October 24th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #784
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asakaze View Post
A direct service with a stop at Shinagawa already exists via the Keikyu Main Line (Haneda - Sengakuji), the Toei Asakusa Line (Sengakuji - Oshiage), The Keisei Oshiage Line (Oshiage - Aoto) and the Keisei Main Line (Aoto - Narita Ap.). Takes 93 minutes, the fare is 1800 Yen.
I always find it hard to find this service. It's always "NEX or SkyLiner or Keisei Access Line". I'm guessing it's not promoted much because either
  • it doesn't run frequently
  • it uses three separate company's railways
  • it is a new service
  • all of the above?

However, I thought I saw something posted at one time which pointed to the Keisei SkyLiner line being extended into Tokyo (rather than branch off at Aoto)
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Old October 25th, 2014, 01:16 PM   #785
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There is one Airport Access Limited Express leaving Narita or Haneda every 40 Minutes between 7 and 15 o'clock. After that the access expresses go to Ueno, I don't know the reason though.

What may get extended to Tokyo Station is the Tsukuba express. That would be completely underground though, and the plans are currently on hold. Apparently the basement of the Akihabara Washington Hotel is in the way, and several other subway tunnels (Hibiya Line, Shinjuku Line) too. Also, the Tokyo terminal would have to be constructed in about 50 m depth.
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Old October 26th, 2014, 06:08 AM   #786
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The airport limited acces is okay, but it is the skyliner where the most potential is. After all, it runs on part of the Shinkansen viaducts that was canceled.

It is the fastest non-Shinkansen train and runs in standard gauge. Problem is that it terminates in Nipppori/Ueno and so it doesn't serve as many as it could. In short it isn't as useful as JR Narita express. I had thought there was a possibility of extending the Skyliner but I can not remember where to.
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Old October 31st, 2014, 04:20 PM   #787
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From Rail Journal:

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http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=542

JR Central’s Chuo maglev project approved
Friday, October 31, 2014



CONSTRUCTION of the first phase of JR Central's Chuo Shinkansen maglev project linking Tokyo and Nagoya has been approved by Japan's Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT)

The 285.6km first phase will cost Yen 4158bn ($US 38.13bn) for the infrastructure plus Yen 136.5bn for the trains funded entirely by JR Central. When the line opens in 2027 a journey time of 40 minutes is envisaged. The line will have a maximum design speed of 505km/h. This compares with a current maximum speed of 270km/h on the Tokaido Shinkansen and a Tokyo – Nagoya journey time of 1h 35min

...
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Old November 16th, 2014, 06:25 PM   #788
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Japan's levitating maglev train reaches 500km/h (311mph)

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15 November 2014 Last updated at 13:23 GMT
Train fans have experienced the speed of super-fast maglev trains, during test runs for members of the public in central Japan.
One hundred passengers whizzed along a 42.8km (27 mile) route between the cities of Uenohara and Fuefuki, reaching speeds of up to 500km/h (311mph).
The Central Japan Railway Company is running eight days of testing for the experimental maglev Shinkansen train on its test track in Yamanashi Prefecture.
The maglev trains are even faster than Japan's famous bullet trains, which currently travel at about 320km/h (200mph).
They use magnetic levitation, hence the name, to "float" above the train tracks.
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Train fans have experienced the speed of super-fast maglev trains, during test runs for members of the public in central Japan.

One hundred passengers whizzed along a 42.8km (27 mile) route between the cities of Uenohara and Fuefuki, reaching speeds of up to 500km/h (311mph), The Asahi Shimbun website reports. The Central Japan Railway Company is running eight days of testing for the experimental maglev Shinkansen train on its test track in Yamanashi Prefecture. In total, 2,400 people will take part in the tests after winning tickets in a raffle. They represent a lucky minority - there had been more than 100 times that number of applications, the report says. "I applied for my nephew who is a big railway fan, but now I am more excited than he is," one passenger, who was travelling with his parents and two young nephews, tells the website.

The maglev trains are even faster than Japan's famous bullet trains, which currently travel at about 320km/h (200mph). They use magnetic levitation, hence the name, to "float" above the train tracks. This minimises the friction encountered by ordinary trains, and allows them to travel faster. Maglev trains are due to be up and running by 2027. The ones being tested in Yamanashi will eventually run from Tokyo to Nagoya, carrying passengers between the two cities in about 40 minutes. Currently the journey takes an hour longer than that by bullet train.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-30067889

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Old November 16th, 2014, 06:34 PM   #789
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Old November 17th, 2014, 08:42 AM   #790
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Given that it's a passive levitiation system, how smooth is the ride? Is it much smoother than the German Transrapid system (which has active levitation control)?
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Old November 17th, 2014, 09:04 AM   #791
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I haven't been on the Japanese maglev, but I have been on the Shanghai (German) maglev, and that one shakes like crazy. Considering that one levitates like 1 cm above the surface, while the Japanese maglev levitates like 10 cm above the surface, I would feel safe betting the Japanese ride is more comfortable.
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Old November 28th, 2014, 11:06 PM   #792
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JR Tokai to accelerate start of work on maglev Shinkansen, by year-end

Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Tokai) President Koei Tsuge announced on Nov. 27 that construction of the maglev Shinkansen line between Tokyo and Nagoya will get under way on Dec. 17, ahead of schedule.

Scheduled to begin operations in 2027, the Linear Chuo Shinkansen will connect Tokyo's Shinagawa Station and Nagoya Station in the Aichi Prefecture capital using new technology that utilizes magnetic levitation to hover above the tracks to reduce friction.

Construction will begin Dec. 17 with ceremonies at both stations to pray for the safety of the construction workers, Tsuge said at a regular news conference.

According to JR Tokai, the company will establish a stockyard to store construction materials on land it owns near Shinagawa Station. Operations to move shops and station facilities under Nagoya Station's Shinkansen line platform will also be starting in preparation of establishing an underground maglev terminal.

Tsuge told the media in late September that it would be difficult for construction to start within the year. But the schedule was moved forward after the green light to begin work was given on Oct. 17, which allowed information sessions to residents around the two stations to be completed.

"We will respond properly to assure the safety and the conservation of the environment during construction," Tsuge said during the news conference.

JR Tokai began holding information sessions for residents living along the proposed maglev line on Oct. 27. The railway completed 40 of the 51 planned sessions by Nov. 26.

The company plans to continue holding briefing sessions, along with surveying the areas and the signing of contracts with owners of the land the line is set to run through.


http://ajw.asahi.com/article/business/AJ201411280057
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Old November 29th, 2014, 08:57 AM   #793
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very high speed is very dangerous for him.
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Old December 8th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #794
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
Given that it's a passive levitiation system, how smooth is the ride? Is it much smoother than the German Transrapid system (which has active levitation control)?
Active vs. passive has everything to do with height. Transrapid is active because it requires a computer to actively calculate the height from the rails and make adjustments. The Mag-lev in Japan needs to sit in a trough and doesn't need constant monitoring as it sits higher above the rails. I would think comfort is a product of many things, but as was already mentioned usually the Japanese have high standards for comfort on their trains, so I wouldn't doubt that it will match or beat comfort levels on the German mag-lev.
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Old December 9th, 2014, 03:01 PM   #795
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That's over simplifiying it a bit.

The german system is inherently unstable as it's an attractive system, whereas the Japanese system uses a repulsive system, so the forces of gravity and magnetic repellance balance each other out.
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Old December 9th, 2014, 05:07 PM   #796
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I don't think the method of levitation have anything to do with the smoothness of the ride. Ideally both draws a perfect sin curve as they move down the tracks which will not be felt but the train will be boobing up and down at a certain frequency. Force that disrupts this ideal sin curve create the jolt which could be wind sheers, misalignment of the tracks, or for the German system a disruption in the AC/AC converter that is not calibrated correctly disrupting the sin curve in switching the polarity of the electromagnets that lifts the train up. This is not a problem for the JR system since the sheer speed induces an electrical current within the secondary coils embedded within the tracks generating the magnetism that creates the lift.
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Old December 9th, 2014, 09:45 PM   #797
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I wish I could say I completely understood what you just said SamuraiBlue, but sadly, I am lacking.

Has anyone got any videos showcases the noise outside the train (and even better, compared to regular Shinkansen). I've seen a few but they're using the older trainsets. I'd imagine noise has decreased on the newer trains.
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Old December 9th, 2014, 10:40 PM   #798
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
I don't think the method of levitation have anything to do with the smoothness of the ride. Ideally both draws a perfect sin curve as they move down the tracks which will not be felt but the train will be boobing up and down at a certain frequency. Force that disrupts this ideal sin curve create the jolt which could be wind sheers, misalignment of the tracks, or for the German system a disruption in the AC/AC converter that is not calibrated correctly disrupting the sin curve in switching the polarity of the electromagnets that lifts the train up. This is not a problem for the JR system since the sheer speed induces an electrical current within the secondary coils embedded within the tracks generating the magnetism that creates the lift.
Good explanation.
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Old December 10th, 2014, 06:33 AM   #799
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I wish I could say I completely understood what you just said SamuraiBlue, but sadly, I am lacking.
It's not that difficult if you break it down. As you magnets of the same polarity repels and of different polarity attracts one another.
Another would be what's know as Fleming's left hand rule in which a magnetic field is created perpendicular at a 90 degree angle to the flow of electricity so the magnetic field will switch polarity by simply switching the direction of flow of the electric current. An Alternative Current or AC is doing just that in which the flow of the current is switching side like a wave washing in and out on a shore coming in the flowing out. with time as X axis and flow of electricity as Y it creates a sine wave. If you lay down a row of permanent magnets on the guide line and place a row of electo-magnets constantly switching polarity on the car then the magnets pulls and pushes in a form of a sine wave. This is basically how maglevs works.

The JR system levitation utilizes another rule called the Fleming's right hand rule in which if you move a permanent magnet close to a metal coil it induces an electric current in the coil again perpendicular at a 90 degree angle inducing a magnetic field and as the electric current starts flowing the opposite direction as the permanent magnet moves away switching the polarity of the magnetic field as well. So if you have many metal coils on the side of the guide way you create the same phenomenon as described above.
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Old December 10th, 2014, 10:50 AM   #800
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Thank you for that samurai blue. The two posts combined actually make sense. I had seen the diagrams of his it works but this post has encouraged me to study the specifics.
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