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Old July 24th, 2009, 01:29 PM   #101
mramelet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArthurK View Post
The NS Hispeed website (in Dutch) says Thalys will run high speed (300 km/h) between Rotterdam and Antwerpen starting from december 13th 2009. It looks like the Schiphol-Rotterdam part will initially remain 160 km/h, while it's for me still unclear when that will be upgraded to 300 km/h. I guess that it will be fall 2010, when they will commence the cross-border Fyra-services with 250 km/h.
Yes!!!
Finally!
I take the train in Rotterdam so for me it doesn't matter that it won't be 300 km/h from Amsterdam (and anyway, the new track at 160 will save time from Amsterdam as well).
But I will believe once I will see it. They have already annouced so many times that this would happen. Will the Thalys really be ready this time?
That would be so cool!
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Old July 26th, 2009, 06:16 PM   #102
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Nice dutch train look like a fusion between train and american truck.
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Old July 27th, 2009, 11:56 PM   #103
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The train has a similar appearance to this machine:



The Nissan Cube - not necessarily a bad thing mind you. If I can recall correctly, this project has been in the works for well over a decade and for the longest time, only a few people stood in its path - literally. An older woman wouldn't sell her land to the government to allow the rails to be expanded, a decade or so later, it is happening. I guess she died?!
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Old July 28th, 2009, 12:47 AM   #104
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No way, the Cube has much better lines and dimensions. And lets be honest if a High Speed train can be compared with a boxy city car there's something quite not right.
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Old July 29th, 2009, 07:55 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xlchris View Post

The Fyra trains have a top speed of 250km/h, but the maximum speed on tracks between Amsterdam and Rotterdam is only 160km/h
!
If you think 160 kph is slow, you should to come to America, see our shit trains, and you will immediately feel better about it.
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Old July 30th, 2009, 03:25 AM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay View Post
If you think 160 kph is slow, you should to come to America, see our shit trains, and you will immediately feel better about it.



At least in America you get to see some good scenery from your slow-moving train windows.
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Old July 30th, 2009, 05:40 AM   #107
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Quote:
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At least in America you get to see some good scenery from your slow-moving train windows.
I wouldn't even go there if I were you. The Netherlands has beautiful picturesque fields and countryside (including miles of reclaimed land, or "polder") which the trains cross back and forth between major cities. I mean, I love our own countryside and our own natural landmarks, but there is no need to doubt that there is scenery that is just as beautiful -or even nicer at times- in other countries.

image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr


Not my own images by the way, I found these on flickr.
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Old July 30th, 2009, 08:31 AM   #108
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[QUOTE=DWNTWN;40510568]I wouldn't even go there if I were you. The Netherlands has beautiful picturesque fields and countryside (including miles of reclaimed land, or "polder") which the trains cross back and forth between major cities. I mean, I love our own countryside and our own natural landmarks, but there is no need to doubt that there is scenery that is just as beautiful -or even nicer at times- in other countries.


Blimey, I was just being light hearted!

Pretty much anywhere in the world offers something nice to see from a train window, so calm down, calm down, as they say in Liverpool.

(Please, no one now get angry and write a post stating that no one in Liverpool says "calm down, calm down").
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Old July 30th, 2009, 11:55 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedStriker View Post
Blimey, I was just being light hearted!

Pretty much anywhere in the world offers something nice to see from a train window, so calm down, calm down, as they say in Liverpool.

(Please, no one now get angry and write a post stating that no one in Liverpool says "calm down, calm down").
I'm sorry Ted, I just have a hard time recognizing sarcasm when it is written . The sad part is, people here in the United States might actually use that as an argument...
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Old July 31st, 2009, 12:49 AM   #110
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So are you an American who is fan of Dutch trains, or a Dutchman living in America?
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Old July 31st, 2009, 02:26 AM   #111
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Quote:
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So are you an American who is fan of Dutch trains, or a Dutchman living in America?
I'm an American who is a fan of Dutch trains. I have family there so I visit them every four years or so. Well, I'm a fan of most trains. I love most EMU's, and I wish there were more of them in the States. There's a lot we can learn from the rail infrastructure in Europe, in my opinion. What about yourself?
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Old July 31st, 2009, 02:41 AM   #112
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I'm a Brit in Britain who appreciates any kind of railway anywhere.

What's interesting to me is how railways are going through a renaissance across the globe.

Common themes in Europe and the Americas (North and South) in particular seem to be the lack of the lack of money to move quickly, problems with planning, and a collective feeling of regret for past decisions which either led to a lack of investment, or the destruction of infrastructure.

Meanwhile in the Middle East, a brand new rail network is gradually taking shape, nearly 200 years after the world's first line was built in Britain.

The fact that the USA is planning a network of high speed passenger trains I find amazing.
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Old July 31st, 2009, 12:03 PM   #113
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Europe isn't in the best of positions there. Railways were embraced here at an early stage which means we're now riding on old tracks with significant limitations. Sharp corners that would derail high speed services, tunnels that won't allow double deckers etc.

It's easier in the Middle East. If you can start from scratch at this point anno 2009, you're cruising.
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Old July 31st, 2009, 12:49 PM   #114
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I reckon in 50 years time the Middle East will have an impressive mixed traffic system, connecting to Europe, the CIS and to South Asia.

Do you think this will see the arrival of keffiyeh-wearing train spotters? (Or rail fans if you're in North America).
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Old July 31st, 2009, 01:01 PM   #115
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Good question, I don't think so. Seems to me most of the train spotters originate from countries with a long history in railways. I'd like to be proven wrong though.

Not sure about the Middle East traffic system connecting well to Europe. Political climate doesn't seem right.
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Old July 31st, 2009, 01:28 PM   #116
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I know what you mean. However, political climates can change rapidly in just a few decades.

Plus the physical rail links with Europe already exist, via Turkey. If the region around Syria, Iran and Iraq becomes more stable (no laughing please) then I perhaps some proper transit freight and passenger services may be set up, as trade increases and people move around more.

And these may extend into Sauda Arabia, for exmaple, which is busy building several rail routes.

But for now, this is just the stuff of fantasy of course - I believe that armed guards still travel on trains that go close to the border with Syria and Iraq...
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Old August 8th, 2009, 11:29 PM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedStriker View Post
I know what you mean. However, political climates can change rapidly in just a few decades.

Plus the physical rail links with Europe already exist, via Turkey. If the region around Syria, Iran and Iraq becomes more stable (no laughing please) then I perhaps some proper transit freight and passenger services may be set up, as trade increases and people move around more.

And these may extend into Sauda Arabia, for exmaple, which is busy building several rail routes.

But for now, this is just the stuff of fantasy of course - I believe that armed guards still travel on trains that go close to the border with Syria and Iraq...
It's not that much of a fantasy anymore, folks. Iran has just finished to
build the last stretch of rails that links Europe with India, and on August 14th,
a container service between Istanbul and Islamabad will start running. I do
not know how the'll manage the lake Van ferry crossing - the ferry can't
take more than 6 carriages at a time - but that will really be interesting to
watch. Add the Marmaray project to that, which will allow a dry crossing
underneath the Bosphorus in 2-3 years, and you have your direct Europe
to India connection operational. And as Iran has alrady an operational
connection to Turkmenistan also, this way you can join China, over
Uzbekistan and Kazakstan. It's taking shape, guys. Shipping companies
might even start worrying.
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Old August 9th, 2009, 12:12 AM   #118
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There's a thread on Iran's railways by the way, and I've already put the story up about the new container train.

You're right about Lake Van. Just what are they going to do - go to/fro several times?!
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Old August 13th, 2009, 12:45 AM   #119
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What a nice topic!
I'm an italian and I visit Netherlands just one time.
Wonderfull landscape, excellent rail services and very interesting rolling stock... sadly i'm not so enthusiast about Ansaldobreda ones.
I say that 'couse I'm engineer and I work in the maintenance field: in Italy railway industries still not are able to project a vehicle with the aim to allow its good maintenance.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 11:27 AM   #120
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THE NETHERLANDS | High Speed Rail

On 7 september the High Speed Rail line between Amsterdam and Rotterdam opened for passengers.

The tracks have been ready (but not in use) for over two years. The delay of operation was mainly caused by problems implementing the European Train Management System (ERTMS – level 2). Another problem was that the trains, ordered from Ansaldo Breda, are not finished yet. So the trains that are now running are rented TRAXX engines with revised intercity coaches, until the V250 trains are delivered. This means that the maximum speed at the line is now only 160km/h. Still this has reduced the travel time between Amsterdam and Rotterdam with 20 minutes (mostly due to a shorter route).

The train runs on existing tracks between Amsterdam Central and Schiphol Airport, but uses the brand new HSL tracks from Schiphol to Rotterdam. After Rotterdam the tracks continue to Antwerp and Brussels, with a connection to the city of Breda. But these tracks remain unused for a couple of months. In december the Thalys train between Amsterdam and Paris will start using these track, shortening the travel time significantly.

Travel,times:
Amsterdam – Rotterdam:
Old Intercity: 1h03
Current (temporary): 43min
Eventually (when v250 Fyra trains are operational): 36min

Amsterdam – Breda:
Old Intercity: 1h44
Eventually: 59min

Amsterdam – Antwerp:
Old Intercity: 2h
December (Thalys): 1h17
Eventually (v250 Fyra and Thalys): 1h10

Amsterdam – Brussels:
Old Intercity: 2h40
December (Thalys): 1h57
Eventually (V250 Fyra and Thalys): 1h44

Amsterdam – Paris:
Currently (Thalys): 4h11
Eventually: 3h13

Some English language press:
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/s...-services.html
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