daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > City/Metro Compilations

City/Metro Compilations Help report active highrise/urban developments occurring in your city to the global SSC community.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 16th, 2010, 08:10 AM   #81
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Germantown Town Center
Located in the affluent suburb of Germantown outside of Memphis, Tennessee, Germantown Town Center will be a 45-acre, high-density mixed-use development that blends residential, office over retail, restaurants, a hotel, department store, and junior anchor retail. Totaling 1.3 million square feet, this phased development includes 300,000 sf of retail and restaurants, 300 residential units, 165,000 sf of office, a 250-room hotel, three parking decks, and some surface and angled street parking in the first phase.


YMCA & The Madison Apartments @ Schilling Farms

Life Time Fitness
115,000-square-foot center


Fairfield Inn & Suites Hospitality | Olive Branch, MS
Construction completed a month ahead of schedule on this new four-story, Fairfield Inn and Suites. With 110 rooms, outdoor pool and fitness center, this property is now open for business.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 18th, 2010, 08:04 PM   #82
Jim856796
Registered User
 
Jim856796's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Citizen of the World
Posts: 8,943
Likes (Received): 843

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Ryall View Post
Liberty Bowl Stadium Renovation, Phase 1- $5,000,000 (Gate 4 Reconstruction, Expanded Home Locker Rooms, Relocation of Visitor Locker Rooms, Media/ Conference Space, Female Restroom Expansion, American Disability Act Compliance).
Additional Renovation Phases will continue for the next 4 to 5 years.
Capacity: 63,000 seats, Built in 1965 (previous $20,000,000 renovation in1987)


Officials cut the ribbon Wednesday on what they hope will be a bright new future for Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, thanks to a number of upgrades. The locker room renovation cost over 1.8 million dollars, while the gate 4 project cost over 3 million dollars. One of the first things visitors will notice as they walk into the stadium are new ramps designed to make the building more accessible to the disabled.
The disabled will also find that new seating changes will make it easier to see activities on the field. All around the stadium, special care has been taken to make bathrooms more accessible to wheelchairs and other devices.
Meanwhile, in another part of the stadium, there are large meeting rooms that can be used for sports-related interviews or rented out for profit. Fans will also find that the stadium now has listening devices to help folks who need them hear games. And when you visit the Liberty Bowl, be sure to check out the new concession stands and locker rooms.
Officials said plans have already been made to do more renovations in the future.
In December of 1983, city of Memphis officials named the playing surface Rex Dockery Field in honor of the late Tiger coach who was killed in a plane crash.
Included in the 1987 stadium renovation were the addition of the sky-suites located on the east side of the stadium, approximately 12,000 seats in the stands and a stadium club to accommodate donors. In addition, several areas of the stadium were vastly improved, including the lighting system, playing surface, handicap seating area, concession stands and restroom facilities.
The largest crowd to witness a Memphis home football game at the Liberty Bowl was the record-setting 65,885 who attended the Tigers’ stunning upset of No. 6 ranked Tennessee in 1996.
I read on the Liberty Bowl Stadium's Wikipedia article that in 2007, a new stadium was planned by then-mayor Willie Herenton. The Liberty Bowl does look similar to the now-deceased Tampa Stadium. That new stadium was planned for a potential NFL franchise, but Memphis is already located within 500 miles of 6 NFL teams. Building a new stadium and/or getting an NFL franchise to Memphis is highly unlikely. Also, the stadium has few or no luxury boxes. Because of these issue, we should be thankful about the recent upgrades to the Liberty Bowl Stadium.
__________________
I honestly think all development projects must be sustainable and futureproof.

You support the good projects... and oppose the bad.
Jim856796 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2010, 01:31 AM   #83
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
a new stadium was planned by then-mayor Willie Herenton.
Yeah, but it's not a good idea now. Major upgrades is the responsible choice for the city. We offered up the Liberty Bowl in the 90's for the expansion franchise that became the Jaguars and now Jacksonville has a mess on its hands with the new stadium they built. Memphis dodged a bullet on that deal. Yeah, around here you get a lot of Saints, Cowboys & Titans fans and that's ok. We're already paying for a NBA franchise which is thankfully doing a lot better this year. I'm not a fan of using public money to subsidize pro sports franchises.

You can still catch good college football games in the area with Ole Miss, Arkansas State, U of Memphis, the AutoZone Liberty Bowl & Southern Heritage Classic. I once read in local media that the new Phased $30 million Upgrades will ensure her service for up to 30 more years. Also, the Liberty Bowl's surroundings are gearing up for major beautification & redevelopment...

The city of Memphis is moving forward with a $175 million plan to transform the Mid-South Fairgrounds into a multipurpose public space, complete with athletic facilities, shopping, parks and housing.

__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys

Last edited by Johnny Ryall; January 19th, 2010 at 05:26 PM.
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:06 AM   #84
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Memphis airport officials unveil plans for ground transportation center
The Commercial Appeal | By Wayne Risher


This illustration shows the Memphis International Airport Ground Transportation Center that will be built starting in March.
Photo courtesy of the Memphis Shelby County Airport Authority

Airport officials unveiled plans Wednesday for a new ground transportation center that amounts to a new front door for Memphis International Airport. They said the center, which combines passenger parking and rental cars next to the terminal building, will create a dramatic and attractive new first impression for people entering the airport by way of ground transportation. The seven-level center will be sheathed with perforated metal panels, reminiscent of a large airplane wing. It will be accented by screened lighting and adorned with a 40-foot-tall airport logo: a jet with a contrail shaped like a musical note. Most of the 1960s terminal building, with its distinctive champagne glass design by architect Roy Harrover, will no longer be visible from the entrance road.


This illustration shows a walkway and courtyard in the planned Memphis International Airport Ground Transportation Center, which will be constructed starting in March. Photo courtesy of the Memphis Shelby County Airport Authority.

"Memphis is transportation and Memphis is music, so it makes perfect sense," said Convention and Visitors Bureau president Kevin Kane, who joined business and community leaders for an unveiling of project plans and renderings at Hilton Memphis. "I think the design is spectacular. It has that classic modern look you're beginning to see at world-class airports around the world," Kane added. Architect Marty Gorman, president of Memphis Heritage, had a different reaction. "The classic terminal building, with its strong axial automobile approach, is totally blocked by this seven story behemoth! Most unfortunate," Gorman said in an e-mail. Available land and functionality dictated the new building would become the airport's most visible entry feature, along with a 336-foot-tall air traffic control tower that's under construction.

Airport officials wanted to combine passenger parking and rental cars in one building to save on construction costs and eliminate shuttle busing for rental car users. The logical spot for the building was a long-term parking lot between the existing three-level parking deck and the control tower. "Great care has been taken to make this a highly attractive facility, the nation's most functional and passenger-centric facility, a green approach to ground transportation and a complement to the existing airport infrastructure," said Airport Authority president and CEO Larry Cox. The center will house rental car counters, service functions and up to 1,250 rental cars on the bottom two floors. There will be 4,500 public spaces for passenger parking on the upper five floors. A landscaped, atrium-like corridor with sidewalks and moving walkways will connect the new building to the terminal, where escalators will lead up to the baggage claim level. Flintco Inc. has an $89.4 million contract to build the center, starting in March and finishing in 2012. Authority chairman Arnold Perl said, "The new Ground Transportation Center will transform the experience for the traveling public. It will further enhance the customer service experience, which ranks third already according to J.D. Powers for medium-sized airports." Greater Memphis Chamber chairman Tom Schmitt applauded the focus on customer service and said he thinks it will give the airport a second "wow factor" architecturally, in addition to the terminal building. "I like it. It projects the right image and it's looking forward. It's making something that works already, even better."

__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:07 AM   #85
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

The rise of America's Aerotropolis: New Air Traffic Control Tower topped off
Commercial Appeal | Wayne Risher



The last structural piece of a 336-foot-tall tower -- a platform decorated with a Christmas tree, American flag, contractor Flintco Inc.'s logo and an Iron Workers Local union banner -- was lifted into place shortly after 11 a.m. A radar and antennas will be installed atop the tower in mid- January, bringing it to finished height. It will be one of the tallest in the country; in the South, only the airports in Atlanta (398 feet) and Orlando (345 feet) have taller towers. The 24,000-square-foot building attached to the base of the tower will house training rooms, administrative offices and an expanded terminal radar approach control with space for future growth.

The tower and an adjoining radar control building are scheduled to be commissioned in early 2011. Featuring seismic safeguards and the latest security and air traffic simulation capabilities, the new tower is 150 feet south and 100 feet west of a 185-foot tower that has been in service since 1977. It will provide air traffic controllers better views of the airport's farthest reaches. The existing tower will be torn down to complete the project, bringing total cost to about $72 million, the FAA says.

Gusting winds delayed the topping off just over an hour from the scheduled time. Flintco, the general contractor, waited for wind speed to drop before a crane operated by Barnhart Crane & Rigging hoisted the tower's "penthouse," steadied by two guide ropes. Flintco built the two-level, 850-square-foot tower cab on the ground to make sure the components fit together properly before they were disassembled and lifted into place section by section.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:08 AM   #86
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Main Street’s ‘Big Hole’ Reaches Symbolic Milestone with Barboro Flats
ANDY MEEK | The Daily News



Previously: Today’s topping off ceremony for what once was a giant hole at 100 S. Main St. represents a milestone. By next summer, the property will be the site of a parking garage and 92 apartment units. The mixed-use development owned by 100 South Main Partners and the Downtown Parking Authority. The ceremony also brings the finish line in sight for what’s been a much-anticipated and long-delayed redevelopment of a centerpiece of Downtown’s Demonstration Block. That’s how the Center City Commission refers to the two-block stretch of Main Street that extends from Union Avenue to Gayoso Avenue.

Full article: http://memphisdailynews.com/editoria....aspx?id=46711
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:08 AM   #87
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

NOW OPEN
Construction of an 8-story, $21.1 million, 131-room Courtyard Marriott Hotel in Downtown Memphis with approximately 23,000sf of commercial space.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys

Last edited by Johnny Ryall; January 11th, 2012 at 07:25 PM.
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:09 AM   #88
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

East Memphis' Triad Centre III prepares to open

Triad Centre III is the third in a three-building office complex totaling nearly 400,000 square feet of Class-A office space. It offers a prime office location in the heart of the Poplar corridor, the center of business in Memphis. This seven-story office building will feature an impressive front entry and thru-lobby with granite floors, mahogany wall panels, and barrel vaulted ceiling.

The $30 million project includes an 821-space parking garage that will serve both the new building and its older sibling office buildings, now known simply as 6000 Poplar and 6060 Poplar.

The older buildings will be renamed Triad Centre I and II in a rebranding of Highwoods Properties' 10-acre complex at Poplar at Shady Grove.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys

Last edited by Johnny Ryall; June 21st, 2012 at 11:09 PM.
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:10 AM   #89
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Smith & Nephew completes $14M acquisition of site for new HQ
the Commercial Appeal | By Toby Sells



Smith & Nephew Inc. completed the $14 million acquisition of what will become its Memphis headquarters on Friday and is ready to begin improvements that will bring employees to the site by late summer. The medical device maker bought the four-story, 285,315-square-foot building that once housed the headquarters of Harrah's Entertainment at 7216 Goodlett Farms. Harrah's left Memphis for Las Vegas in 2008.

The company said the entire project will cost $42 million in real estate, renovations and new equipment. Renovations will begin this winter. "This is not a simple real estate transaction. We will transform this property into the crown jewel of Memphis' biomedical strategy," said Joseph M. DeVivo, president of Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics. "Not only does this property represent the future for Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, but I believe it will be a catalyst for future investment in our community by other biomedical companies."

The company is expected to move numerous nonmanufacturing jobs to the new site from its Brooks Road location. Management has repeatedly stated that the company will not move out of its Brooks Road location. The move will also allow the company to consolidate some of its U.S. business operations, such as information systems, to the Brooks Road campus. It would also free space for more manufacturing operations at Brooks Road.

The second phase of the Goodlett Farms project would include renovation of a warehouse to laboratories, conference rooms and auditoriums where visiting surgeons will learn how to implant Smith & Nephew's devices. The expansion project will create 160 jobs with annual average wage of $93,427, according to documents the company filed with Shelby County. Matt Kisber, Tennessee commissioner of economic and community development, said the purchase shows Smith & Nephew's continued commitment to Memphis and Tennessee.

Shelby County Interim Mayor Joe Ford said the move will be a further boon for the county and for Memphis. "You could not have asked a company to reward a city like Smith & Nephew has done," Ford said. Larry Jensen, president and CEO of Memphis-based Commercial Advisors LLC, represented Smith & Nephew in the deal. Harrah's was represented by Chicago-based Jones Lang LaSalle.

__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:11 AM   #90
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Methodist/LeBonheur Hospital - Germantown, TN

Memphis Business Journal - by Michael Sheffield

Interior at Methodist Germantown’s new Women’s and Children’s Pavilion
ALAN HOWELL | MBJ

Shortly after Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital opens its new 218,000-square-foot Women’s and Children’s Pavilion Feb. 12, the hospital will begin the next phase of its $121 million renovation project: improvements to 100,000 square feet of space that previously housed the women’s care facility. Those improvements will include construction of a new 16-bed intensive care unit and expansion of adult surgical space, the hospital’s pharmacy and cardiovascular department. The renovations are scheduled to be completed late this year, says William Kenley, CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown. Once the project is completed, Kenley estimates the hospital will hire up to 100 new non-medical staff employees. It currently has 1,200 employees. He says changes to the existing hospital represent a shift in philosophy from designing hospitals from the caregiver’s perspective. “We’ve involved the patients in the design process and we’re incorporating a lot of things that will make this an asset to them,” Kenley says.

The structure will be the first LEED-certified hospital in the city, says Donna Hess, project manager for Methodist Germantown, and includes LEED features like low volume toilets and shower heads. The hospital recycled 89% of the waste products from construction. Ed Scharff, associate principal and lead designer in the Memphis office of TRO Jung Brannen, which designed the project, says the project was designed to reach LEED silver status, but the hope now is to hit LEED gold. “The goal was to provide a relaxed, low-stress environment in keeping with the neighborhood feel of Germantown,” Scharff says. “We didn’t see it as a very high-tech, polished, slick building, but depending on where it finishes, it’ll be the first in the city.”
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys

Last edited by Johnny Ryall; June 17th, 2012 at 10:23 PM.
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:11 AM   #91
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Workers replacing four U.S. 63 bridges, soon to be U.S. Interstate 555 (Memphis-Jonesboro/ Paragould CSA [population=160,000]



the Jonesboro Sun | By Michael Wilkey

TYRONZA — Construction workers moving orange cones and white gravel into place are the precursors of things to come over the next two years as four bridges will be replaced along U.S. 63. Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department District 10 engineer Walter McMillan said workers with Robertson Contractors of Poplar Bluff, Mo., began work earlier this month. McMillan said the $7.3 million project will replace bridges near the Travelair Motel and a bridge, halfway between Tyronza and Marked Tree. From there, a bridge near Deckerville at the Poinsett-Crittenden county line and a bridge near Interstate 55-U.S. 63 will be replaced, McMillan said. McMillan, based in Paragould, said the Marked Tree-area projects will be completed first. “We will have detours,” McMillan said. “As they are working on one bridge, the traffic will be switched over to the other lane of traffic [on the 4-lane highway].” The detoured road will create a 2-lane road through the construction area, McMillan said.

Tyronza Mayor Marion Bearden said the project will make travel better throughout the area. “It is very much needed, but it will be difficult for the construction on such a busy stretch of highway,” Bearden said. Bearden said she has concerns over the narrowing of a road near the U.S. 63-Arkansas 149 exit because of the orange cones being placed. “You really have to watch it there,” she said. “I am just afraid about people who do not know the area.” Marked Tree Mayor Dixon Chandler said the construction along U.S. 63 near his community is needed. We’ll be glad to have it,” Chandler said.McMillan also discussed a related project — a proposed access road across the St. Francis Sunken Lands near Payneway. That work is now in its environmental study phase, and the bridge project is expected to be completed by late 2011.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

DeSoto County, MS Officials Eye I-269’s Potential



ERIC SMITH | The Daily News

Interstate 69 is dubbed the “NAFTA Highway” after the North American Free Trade Agreement because it will course through the central U.S. from Canada to Mexico, connecting the continent’s three nations. One of the highway’s key links is Memphis, where the road will intersect with I-269, a beltway that when complete will loop around the area’s outlying communities and provide easier access for vehicles – passenger and freight – traveling into or out of the region. The southern leg of I-269 will stretch for 30 miles across DeSoto County, prompting officials there to begin planning for the road’s effect on potential commercial real estate development. No one understands the importance of I-269 for the county’s economic development more than Jim McDougal, director of the DeSoto County Planning Commission, who has been thinking about this project for the past six years. McDougal envisions the DeSoto County portion of I-269 as more than just another road project that causes urban sprawl, although that is one of the chief concerns surrounding the highway. Instead, he sees the road as an “international trade corridor,” where local, regional, national and even global companies will set up shop by building their distribution centers, transportation hubs and office headquarters. “Obviously it is a tremendous complement to our transportation and logistics industries in the area, but I think it also presents enormous opportunity for us to look at being a location for North American corporate offices,” McDougal said. “We’re right in the center of this whole logistical corridor, and what could be a better spot for dealing with all the commerce in the entire eastern half of the country than right here?”

International opportunities
McDougal’s concept moved closer to reality late last year when the county’s board of supervisors issued a request for qualifications from planning, engineering and architectural firms to create a master plan for the international trade corridor. The study will examine a corridor that encompasses two miles north and two miles south of I-269’s length – 120 square miles or 76,800 acres. A selection committee received seven submissions and narrowed the list down to two teams, each composed of multiple planning and design firms from around the country. The DeSoto Planning Commission on Feb. 25 will recommend a team to the board of supervisors, which will announce the winning bid at its March 3 meeting. The selected team will be tasked with conducting the entire international trade corridor study – with creating the “next major economic and social and cultural development in the Mid-South,” McDougal said. “A highway will develop by itself whether we plan anything or not,” McDougal said. “With an international trade corridor, we have a special opportunity to become part of the whole international business conversation.” The goal, McDougal said, is to find the highest and best land uses for this mostly rural acreage that stretches through the middle of the fastest-growing community in the Mid-South. One advantage DeSoto County has, besides a favorable tax incentive program for businesses, is its proximity to areas where automakers are making investments and where other economic development has sprouted in recent years. “We’re sitting here right in the middle of the Toyota plant in Blue Springs to our southeast and the gaming industry to the southwest,” McDougal said. “We have an opportunity, because so much of our area is open and not developed, to see what kind of development we want to be there and to have a tremendous influence on it on the front end.”

Regional transformation
Though McDougal said he couldn’t yet put a price tag on the project, he has applied for several funding sources and is awaiting responses. Also, the master plan will be completed with the help of the Memphis Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the regional transportation planning group that helps cities and counties plan for their infrastructure needs and secure federal and state transportation dollars. MPO transportation planner Paul Morris said the international trade corridor study is a smart approach to preparing for a project that could transform a regional economic landscape already centered on transportation, distribution and logistics. “Memphis, whether people realize it or not, is a very, very significant player in the trade of not only America, but around the world, especially in terms of freight movement,” Morris said. “Whenever you build a nice highway, there are always people who want to develop along that corridor. The real question is: We need a vision of how that highway should develop.”
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:12 AM   #92
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

It’s ‘full steam ahead’ for construction of $21 million Kroc Center project
Memphis Business Journal - by Andy Ashby

Artist's rendering of Kroc Center of Memphis exterior
Photo Credit : COURTESY TRO JUNG | BRANNEN

Indoor aquatic center will be part of recreational facilities at Kroc Center.
Photo Credit : COURTESY TRO JUNG | BRANNEN

Lobby area
Photo Credit : COURTESY TRO JUNG | BRANNEN

The Salvation Army Memphis has selected Montgomery Martin Contractors LLC to build the $21 million, 100,000-square-foot Kroc Center of Memphis at the Mid-South Fairgrounds, a solid step toward a late February groundbreaking and the end of a challenging pre-development process. “It’s been great after all the neighborhood meetings and focus groups, to be able to meet again with people and show them how we’re doing what they want,” says Stephen Carpenter, director of operations for the Kroc Center. Before starting work with the Kroc Center in 2006, Carpenter had helped co-found New Hope Christian Academy and served as headmaster for 10 years. The site, which covers 15 acres fronting East Parkway and runs from Fairview Middle School to the Fairgrounds entrance, has been cleared of asphalt. Construction is expected to take 16 months with a target completion date of July 2011. “We’re just full steam ahead,” Carpenter says.

The overarching project includes the building and an endowment. In 2005, Memphis was selected as one of 25 cities to receive a matching gift from the Ray & Joan Kroc Trust. The trust will donate $60 million to the project. It initially was going to donate $50 million after $25 million in private funds were raised, but kicked in an extra $10 million due to the site location and demographics. The Kroc Foundation wanted these centers put in places surrounded by various economic and racial groups. There are currently 25 Kroc Centers in various stages across the country, from fundraising to breaking ground. A small center in Atlanta opened last year and two centers in Greenville, S.C. and Augusta, Ga., are at about the same stage as the Memphis one. The Memphis center will be within walking distance to residents in Orange Mound, Vollentine-Evergreen, Cooper-Young, Beltline and Chickasaw Gardens. “For us, you can’t get any better than the Fairgrounds,” Carpenter says.

The project’s land and building costs will total $30 million, leaving $55 million in the endowment for programming and events. Carpenter expects the endowment to have a long life since the nonprofit Salvation Army is fiscally conservative. TRO Jung | Brannen and Fleming/Associates/Architects PC partnered on designing the Kroc Center. TRO was responsible for most of the exterior design and site work; Fleming handled most of the interior design. Ritchie Smith Architects is handling landscape architecture, while Flintco, Inc., was involved in some pre-construction work.

Brett Ragsdale, senior associate with TRO Jung | Brannen, says one design challenge came from the building site facing the large educational buildings of Christian Brothers University to the north and smaller residential structures to the west. “We wanted to be contextual and to do that, we had some large masses which relate to the schools, but we tried to break it down to the scale of the houses across the street, using red brick to relate to residential across the street,” he says. Also, figuring out how to configure the building was challenging, since the Fairgrounds’ future is in a state of flux, especially land to the south and east of the Kroc Center. Initially, the Salvation Army thought it was going to receive 25 acres from local government, but that was scaled back to 15 acres when it was determined it would have to purchase the land from the government. “That challenged us because we couldn’t really cut a lot of programs or space, so we had to try and fit everything on a 15-acre site,” Ragsdale says. “We also didn’t know what was going on around us.” The Kroc Center will be built for four main components: arts, education, recreation and worship. “That’s true for every Kroc Center under way across the country,” Carpenter says. “But how those are defined depends on the individual community.” It will have a 300-seat auditorium that can function as a chapel or theater.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:13 AM   #93
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Ground broken on first section of Wolf River Greenway
the Commercial Appeal | By Don Wade

On a chilly morning better suited to riding a stationary bike or walking on a treadmill inside a health club, three cycling friends with homes in Downtown, Bartlett and Germantown stood in the cold to watch the symbolic ground-breaking of the Wolf River Greenway. “This is wonderful,” Joyce Hudak, who lives Downtown, said this morning moments before Memphis Mayor A C Wharton, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, City Councilman Bill Boyd and others used gold-painted shovels to turn dirt under the bridge near the intersection of Walnut Grove Road and Humphreys Boulevard. “I hope they see it through to completion." Her friends, Brenda Ross of Bartlett and Cathy Distretti of Germantown, agreed. Together, the three middle-age women represented how the eventual 22-mile greenway, which will run along the north side of the Wolf River from Mud Island to Houston Levee Road, will sew the community together with so many green threads. “We’re building trails to connect our people,” Wharton said before about 250 onlookers. “That makes it one Memphis.”

Previous projections for when the 22-mile trail would be completed have ranged from 10 to 15 years. The ground-breaking today took place at the site of the first segment (part of Phase II), a 1.3-mile path between Walnut Grove and Shady Grove roads, adjacent to Humphreys Blvd. Citing current civic “fiscal constraints,” Boyd said, “I would hesitate to put a time limit” on when the greenway would be completed. Wharton did not hesitate. “We had all the various links (planned) going back to 2004,” the mayor said. “It will go a link at a time. It’s not going to happen overnight, but I would think over the next six, seven years it will be completed link by link.”

Construction of the first link, which will cost around $1.4 million, is to begin in a few days. On Thursday morning at 10, there will be another symbolic groundbreaking at Farm Road and Mullins Station for Shelby Farms Greenline, a rails-to-trails project on an abandoned stretch of CSX Railroad right-of-way secured by Shelby County largely with privately raised money. Phase I of the Greenline is a $2.4 million, 6.5-mile path that will connect several Midtown and East Memphis neighborhoods with Shelby Farms Park’s 4,500 acres. Rick Masson, executive director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, said it is “absolutely realistic” to finish the greenline and the greenway within the mayor’s six-to-seven-year projection.

Masson believes the completion of the respective trail systems will enhance Memphis in multiple ways. “It will greatly improve our self-image,” Masson said. “But it’s more than self-image. It will help make us healthier and get along better.” Cathy Distretti can’t wait to start pedaling on the new paths. Yes, she’s aware some people are concerned about crime on isolated stretches of the trails. But she has read where in other cities with greenways crime in those areas actually has gone down. Besides, she and her friends will do what they do now when they have to share the road with motorists – turn the wheels together. “We always ride in a group,” she said. “There’s safety in numbers.”
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys

Last edited by Johnny Ryall; June 17th, 2012 at 10:23 PM.
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:16 AM   #94
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Playhouse on the Square Readies for Building’s Debut
JONATHAN DEVIN | Special to The Daily News


MUSICAL FEATURES: The orchestra pit is one of many amenities at the new $13 million Playhouse on the Square. -- PHOTO BY JONATHAN DEVIN

In anticipation of its grand opening production of “Pippin” Jan. 29, the new three-story Playhouse on the Square near Overton Square held its first preview event this week. The new theater is the culmination of five years of fundraising and more than a year of construction. “We wanted to give the community an opportunity to come in and see what we are doing,” said Whitney Jo, POTS’ managing director. “Originally we thought (the building) would be a bit further along, but it’s going to get there in time for the opening of ‘Pippin.’ The stage and some of the public areas were still under construction when about 100 artists, all of whom had previously donated art to POTS’ annual art auction, became the first guests Wednesday. Jo said POTS had reached its fundraising goal of $13 million for the project, $8.5 million of which covers construction. The rest covers architect fees and the purchase of the property at the corner of Union Avenue and Cooper Street. POTS will continue to raise another $3 million to fund an endowment to cover staff increases and other ancillary expenses. David Burns of the John Morris Agency in Chicago designed the theater. The same agency built Chicago’s noted Steppenwolf Theater after which the new POTS was designed. Jo said she and Jackie Nichols, POTS’ executive director, were pleased the construction funds were raised in five years, noting that construction would not have begun until the funds were secured. Some of the funds are long-term pledges, which will be paid off over the next four years. “We started building this theater in a recession,” Jo said. “We did have our moments when we plateaued in fundraising. We got stuck at $3 million forever, then we got stuck at $6 million forever. “But Jackie has never started something that didn’t happen. The community got with us too and said if Jackie wants it to happen, it’s going to happen.”

The city of Memphis handled demolition of the vacant Kate’s Antique Mall, which formerly occupied the site and had become a home for vagrants. The city also donated to POTS a pie-shaped parcel of land at the corner that extended onto the property. The theater was built into the concrete footing of the former antique mall in order to sidestep codes that mandated new construction to be 25 feet or more away from the curb. The new theater walls reach the sidewalk. POTS also asked for and received a height variance in order to build a tower to house the theater’s fly space, which allows wall-size pieces of scenery to be lifted over the stage. In the end, the variance wasn’t needed as plans for the tower were downsized to save money. said they also reduced plans for an “extravagantly green” park-like rooftop terrace complete with grassy lawns, which would have added about $100,000 to the cost. Instead, the terrace features potted plants and a storm water recovery system.

The house includes 347 seats on two levels, 100 of which are in the balcony. The balcony offers six boxes with two seats each. The former POTS had 258 seats. The stage features trap doors in the floor with a basement underneath and an orchestra pit that is wheelchair accessible by elevator. “Our orchestra no longer has to play in a hallway,” Jo said. “When the building’s foundation was poured we all went down there and cried because we could see our musicians having light and space.” The building also offers expanded gallery and party space.

The five-story building immediately behind the new POTS on Union, which was also purchased by the theater, had no major structural changes, but now serves as administrative offices, rehearsal space, storage space, costume shop, dressing rooms, a green room and will eventually have a first floor café. POTS staff moved into their new offices in December. In February, the other buildings in POTS’ campus will shift as well. Circuit Playhouse, POTS’ non-residential community theater, will move from 1705 Poplar Ave. at Evergreen Street to the existing POTS theater at 51 S. Cooper St. The old Circuit Playhouse will be renamed the Evergreen Theatre and will be leased to TheatreWorks for $1 per year. TheatreWorks at 2085 Monroe Ave. will operate in its current building and in the Evergreen Theatre. POTS’ Varnell Education Building at 1711 Poplar will continue to be the site of its youth acting programs.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:17 AM   #95
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Graceland set for $250 Million redevelopment
Owner wants to make most of area around mansion
The Commercial Appeal | By Tom Bailey Jr.

The man who controls Graceland says he's returning to Memphis next month to re-map the future of the tourist mecca. CKX Inc. has said they will spend $250 million improving 100 acres surrounding Graceland. In the second or third week of January, Robert Sillerman said last week, "We are having an all-hands meeting in Memphis.'' One of his companies, CKX Inc., bought controlling interest of Elvis Presley Enterprises for $100 million in 2004. Several years have now passed since CKX acquired 100 acres surrounding Graceland and first talked of a $250 million redevelopment of the entire area. The work would include demolition of the old visitors center and Heartbreak Hotel and replacing them with larger, better facilities and hotels with convention space and improved public spaces. Sillerman describes next month's event as a two-day design charrette, or intensive planning session. Participants will include members of a master planning firm, architectural firm, design firm, "feasibility people," audio-visual experts and a project manager, he said in phone interview. "We're taking a look at in what phases that should be developed," Sillerman said. "What needs to be developed first and how best we achieve maximization that pays homage to what is there. "But also provide a whole new perspective on where we are going."

Although CKX and Elvis Presley Enterprises are counting on city, county and state support for items like improvements to Elvis Presley Boulevard, the planning session at Graceland will be private. "The meeting with government officials, such as they are, will take place individually," Sillerman said. Within 90 to 120 days after the planning session, "we'll have a very specific idea of what it is we'd like to do," he said. "We have continued to pursue ahead on the exploration side and the development side rather aggressively," he said. "We've actually engaged additional consultants."

The City of Memphis continues to be involved but is waiting on CKX, said Robert Lipscomb, who heads the city's Division of Housing and Community Development. Asked what happens next, Lipscomb replied, "Them coming back with something more definitive." Sillerman agreed, saying city officials "cannot respond to our request now any more positively than they have. "But they need now to get specifics. They need to know exactly what the economic impact will be. How many hundreds or thousands of jobs will be created and what's the project's impact on all of the things that contribute to what makes this so attractive as a development." The government's role will be "to do something with Elvis Presley Boulevard," Lipscomb said. That would include widening and making the street more visually appealing, especially between Graceland and the I-55 exit. Both Sillerman and Lipscomb cited the difficult economy, with Sillerman adding that banks aren't lending money "the way they were." Still, said Lipscomb, the project is hardly mothballed. "A deal like this takes time. It's a huge investment on the private part and a huge investment on the city's part."

Recent financial setbacks to some of Sillerman's ventures aren't affecting progress with the Graceland project, Sillerman said. He made a fortune buying and selling entertainment and media companies (He owns the "American Idol" franchise), but he's recently experienced some well-publicized losses in real estate. The Wall Street Journal published a story earlier this month about the failure of his new Caribbean resort, Temenos, in Anguilla, British West Indies. Sillerman told the Journal he didn't expect to get back the $180 million he lost on Temenos, which is half-built and closed. And he candidly told the Journal, "I think that I exhibited an element of hubris" because resort development "was not my area of expertise by any stretch of the imagination." The Journal also reported that a Sillerman company purchased 18 acres on the Las Vegas Strip for a new casino-hotel, but the project never started and its $475 million mortgage is in default. Those setbacks are "completely unrelated" to the Graceland project, Sillerman told The Commercial Appeal. Graceland, he said, "is an extension of what we already know works. "Heartbreak Hotel, despite the fact it was built as anything but a luxury hotel, maintains the highest occupancy of any hotel in the state of Tennessee," he said. "What we're talking about is an extension of something that has proven to be successful that will be undertaken by the type of experts who can fulfill the vision." While the Caribbean resort is not comparable to the Memphis enterprise, Sillerman said the lesson he takes from Temenos "is to make sure I'm surrounded by people or experts in their particular area. "That's why the design charrette will be populated by literally the top people in each of their fields within the United States." Sillerman still plans "additional stuff" related to Elvis in Las Vegas, although nothing as grand as a casino-hotel complex. "I continue to believe the world in general and Las Vegas in particular is under Elvis. So we're going to take advantage of that. But Graceland will not take a backseat to any Vegas enterprise, he said, adding, "Our No. 1 priority is Memphis."
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:33 AM   #96
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Medical corridor development projects air of viability in Memphis community
Memphis Business Journal - by Michael Sheffield



The recession may have crippled most new development across Memphis, but a drive through the city’s medical corridor tells a different story. There is currently $1.5 billion worth of development under way in the medical corridor ranging from a parking garage at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center to the $450 million UT/Baptist Research Park that will house the Memphis Bioworks Foundation’s offices. Also under construction is Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center’s 650,000-square-foot hospital that includes a 12-story tower and a new emergency room. That project is budgeted around $327 million. Other projects in the area include the $8.5 million Harrah’s Hope Lodge, which will provide cancer patients and their families with a short-term stay facility. Le Bonheur is also building FedEx House, a short-term stay facility for its patients and their families, budgeted at around $8.5 million. The 30 known projects in the medical corridor are all in different stages of development, but what those projects show to Memphians and people visiting Memphis is a commitment to the growth of the second largest industry in the city, says Leigh Anne Downes, director of life science business development for the Greater Memphis Chamber. “Anytime a company comes to town and sees cranes in the air, they know the area is viable,” Downes says. “New development not only says the organization is investing in the community, but the community is investing in the organization.”

Beth Flanagan, director of Memphis Medical Center, says the city’s reputation precedes it in national circles, but the development going on in the medical corridor also serves as a conversation starter and an excitement generator at the same time. She says the challenges will be to create the work force to staff the hospitals and research center that are being developed. Memphis Bioworks Foundation, which also runs the Memphis Academy of Science Education and Education, is working to grow that talent from the ground up. “They can start with the charter school and go up to graduate degrees to create that work force,” Flanagan says. “Then you have organizations like Innova (Memphis, Inc.) to help with the patents and marketing plans. All of those pieces are in place.”

Le Bonheur’s expansion — which is on track to be completed by spring 2010 — will enhance the infrastructure of the area, says Cato Johnson, the hospital’s senior vice president of corporate relations. The bigger developments not only help attract other development and business to the area, but also enhance the quality of care for the existing population, Johnson says. “Those are major additions to the Memphis landscape as it relates to health care for this community,” Johnson says. “We also shouldn’t forget that Memphis itself will be a healthier community because of it. When we’re done, we’ll honestly be able to say the city has some of the best health care available.” When the UT/Baptist Research Park is completed, possibly by 2015, it will represent the latest transformation that has taken place over the last 60 years in the medical community in Memphis, says Bill Tuttle, vice president of planning for Baptist Memorial Healthcare Corp. Baptist donated its former Downtown hospital for the project, which Tuttle says represented an $80 million gift. Baptist also donated the land where the University of Tennessee is building its new pharmacy school. Tuttle, who has “been running around the medical center all my life,” says the development is definitely a great thing for the city, but what goes on in those buildings is more important than the mere presence of them. Tuttle says with the right staff in place when development is completed, no one can fathom how far the city can go. “You can’t put a limit on research talent and brain power,” Tuttle says. “When you look at Bioworks and the biomedical industry, it allows us to integrate well with other entities and parlay some of our existing strengths beyond just medical and science.”

One of those industries is FedEx Corp., which Downes says helps the existing companies meet federal medical shipping regulations. Companies that ship devices, vaccines or body tissue often have a federally mandated 72-hour window to get products to clients. Having FedEx in the city has made all of that possible. “If you have a product, it either came from Memphis or was shipped through Memphis in some capacity,” Downes says. More importantly, she says, is the fact that it will create high-skilled and high-paying jobs, keeping the talent the city is currently growing and attracting new people. “Biotech isn’t replacing what Memphis is known for, but it is enhancing the work force and opportunities for work in Memphis,” Downes says. “You can’t help but be excited about that.”
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:34 AM   #97
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Casino developers to wager $75MYear-long construction project may begin this summer

Memphis Business Journal - by Michael Sheffield

220-room hotel at Isle of Capri has been shuttered since 2002.


The owners of the recently announced Sportsman Casino and Lodge in Tunica plan to invest up to $75 million in a project that could begin construction this summer and be open by the end of the summer of 2011. The project, which is being developed at the site of the former Isle of Capri casino near Sam’s Town Casino and Hotel on Casino Strip, is renovating the 220 hotel rooms left by Isle of Capri when it closed in 2002. A new casino will be built on the property and include about 50,000 square feet of gaming space.

The tentatively named Sportsman Casino and Lodge is being developed by Oxford, Miss.-based Abston-McKay Ventures LLC and Minnetonka, Minn.-based Lakes Entertainment, Inc., an offshoot of the company that originally developed Grand Casino properties in Tunica, Biloxi and Gulfport in the late 1990s.

Lakes Entertainment, which sold its Grand properties to Caesars in 1998, left the Tunica market after the Stratosphere in Las Vegas (which the company had a 45% ownership stake in) went bankrupt in 1998, says Tim Cope, president and CFO of Lakes Entertainment. He says the company rebuilt itself and began developing and managing properties in Michigan, California and Oklahoma for Native American tribes. The company also recently entered into agreements with Penn National Gaming to invest in and own up to 10% of four newly approved casino projects in Ohio, as well as a potential project in Kansas. “In the mid ’90s, we were the fastest growing gaming company in the country, managing more properties than anyone else, with half of them being for Native American groups,” Cope says. “We provide that expertise and we’re looking to develop and manage our own projects.”

Kevin Hunter, CEO of Abston-McKay, says the combination of Lakes Entertainment’s experience in the Tunica market and a local ownership group that includes Orr Family Properties, which owns the land the casino will sit on, will separate this project from previous attempts to start new casinos in Tunica — most notably Myriad Botanical Resort and Solid Gold Casino and Hotel, both of which failed to materialize. “Tunica is a market with its own personality and is one of the earliest and most successful gaming markets outside of Las Vegas,” Hunter says. “We’re working with the group that changed Mississippi to a resort market and that really sets us apart.”

The site was the location where Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc., built its original Tunica property in 1993. Harrah’s sold it in 1999 for $9.5 million to Isle of Capri, which invested about $60 million in infrastructure upgrades before it closed in 2002. The property had further upgrades after the casino closed in order for the hotel on the property to be leased, but a deal never materialized and the property was shuttered for good in late 2002.

Abston-McKay and Lakes Entertainment already have made some infrastructure improvements to the property in advance of announcing the project. The group is working with New York-based Chapdelaine Investments and Global Hunter Securities out of New Orleans on financing.

Succeeding where other ventures failed will be a challenge, says Webster Franklin, CEO of the Tunica Convention and Visitors’ Bureau. But he adds that having a reputable gaming management company like Lakes Entertainment involved is an asset the other proposed developments didn’t have. While Solid Gold is long gone, Franklin stops short of saying Myriad is completely dead because its developers are still seeking investors. Franklin says Sportsman Casino is making other smart moves by building on a space that was previously a casino, which cuts down on construction expenses like the addition of new levee crossings, sewage systems and new roads. “They’re maximizing their potential for success by being in a cluster of a casino strip,” Franklin says. “Also, (Lakes Entertainment CEO) Lyle Berman has an established name and reputation in Tunica.”

The project will give Tunica its long-discussed 10th casino, which would come at a time when industry analysts are predicting the local industry could see total revenues dip below $1 billion for the first time. But, Franklin says, Tunica has traditionally exceeded industry expectations and has seen its numbers remain relatively strong during the recession. “I think we’re where we are because of competition,” Franklin says. “As long as the owners keep putting money into the quality of their properties, another casino could only enhance what we have to offer down here.”

The project will create at least 200 permanent jobs and hundreds of construction jobs. Cope says the plan is to hire local architects and contractors. And Lakes Entertainment, he says, looks forward to its return to Tunica County. “That’s one thing we’ve learned,” he says. “There are a lot of good folks in Mississippi.”
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 12:34 AM   #98
Johnny Ryall
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,779
Likes (Received): 22

Visible School gets $250,000 grant from Assisi Foundation

By Wayne Risher

Visible School landed a $250,000 grant from The Assisi Foundation of Memphis to help with a $1.25 million renovation of its new campus at 200 Madison.

The grant will be matched dollar for dollar by an anonymous donor, generating $500,000 towards relocation of the 10-year-old music and worship arts college Downtown from Cooper-Young.

The school has more than 100 students pursuing careers as musicians, technicians, music business professionals and in music ministry. The renovation of the former C&I Bank building is expected to be completed in time for the 2010-2011 school year.

The Assisi Foundation began in 1994 with proceeds from the sale of St. Francis Hospital. It has awarded more than $100 million in grants in areas including health and human services, education and literacy, social justice/ethics, cultural enrichment and the arts.
__________________
"Memphis is where he's from (in Tennessee). He lives in the street, but he's no bum" -Beastie Boys

Last edited by Johnny Ryall; June 17th, 2012 at 10:24 PM.
Johnny Ryall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2010, 02:17 AM   #99
kingchef
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 296
Likes (Received): 4

is anyone aware of the project start date for the phoenix hotel located in the south main district? and, is there any fact behind the recent "go" on the "tweeked" one beale project. will it contain approximately 600 rooms? thanks for info.
kingchef no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2010, 02:51 AM   #100
jford_1983
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: West TN
Posts: 62
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchef View Post
is anyone aware of the project start date for the phoenix hotel located in the south main district? and, is there any fact behind the recent "go" on the "tweeked" one beale project. will it contain approximately 600 rooms? thanks for info.
As far as I know, both projects are on hold indefinitely. It may be a while before we see those two get constructed, especially during these tough economic times.
__________________
Memphis born. Memphis raised.
jford_1983 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
memphis

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu