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Old October 17th, 2009, 03:18 PM   #41
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Plane crashes in Las Piñas—report


MANILA, Philippines – (UPDATE) A plane crashed in Las Piñas Saturday, according to a radio report, quoting an official of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport.

The DC-3 aircraft crashed into a warehouse in Plaza Quezon, Barangay (village) Aldana, radio dzMM said, citing initial findings by Engineer Bing Lina of NAIA Terminal 1.

Four burned bodies have been seen so far although they have not been identified, the report said.

As of posting time, firemen are trying to put out the flames that engulfed the aircraft following the accident.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 09:35 PM   #42
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Philippine plane crash in Manila suburb kills 4

MANILA: A propeller-driven plane on a test flight crashed and burst into flames in a suburb of the Philippine capital on Saturday, killing at least four people onboard, airport officials said.

The DC-3 plane scraped the roofs of 14 houses in Las Pinas city before it crashed into an abandoned warehouse, but no one was immediately reported injured on the ground, police said. Local residents said two houses close to the warehouse caught fire.

The charred remains of four people have been recovered at the site, Manila airport security manager Angel Atutubo said.

The plane departed Manila airport for Puerto Princesa city in Palawan province southwest of Manila around noon, but the pilot turned the plane back minutes later asking for permission for an emergency landing, Atutubo said.

The plane owned by Victoria Air Inc. was on a test flight, Manila airport operations manager Octavio Lina said. The company could not be reached for comment.

The flight manifest showed seven people on board, including the pilot, but crash investigators could not immediately confirm that number of people was on the plane, Atutubo said. Hours after firefighters put out the fire caused by the crash, only four bodies had been found, he said.

Lita Velasco, who lives nearby, showed with her hand how the plane appeared to wobble, its wings tipping up and down erratically, before it hit the ground followed by a loud explosion.
http://geo.tv/10-17-2009/51160.htm



There are still DC-3's flying around
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Old October 18th, 2009, 05:25 AM   #43
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and that was the last of 'em here...
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Old October 21st, 2009, 08:18 PM   #44
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Six dead after Sudanese cargo plane crashes on take-off in Sharjah

Sharjah: Six people have been killed after a cargo plane crashed on take-off from Sharjah Airport.

The Sudanese registered plane veered sharply to the right after take-off and flipped before crashing.

A Boeing 707, aircraft, carrying general cargo, bound for Khartoum, crashed two minutes after take-off, which was at 3.29pm, from Sharjah International Airport, according to the Sharjah airport authorities.

The flight was operated by Sudan Air and the aircraft owned by ‘Azza Air’.

All six Sudanese nationals on board the plane died in the crash, Issam Awadh Mitwally, Sudanese Consul General, said.
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Old October 24th, 2009, 10:00 PM   #45
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Pilot who overshot airport denies crew was napping

MINNEAPOLIS — The first officer of the Northwest Airlines jet that missed its destination by 150 miles says there was no disagreement in the cockpit, neither he nor the captain was napping and the passengers were never in any danger.

But in an interview with The Associated Press two days after he and a colleague blew past their destination as air traffic controllers tried frantically to reach them, pilot Richard Cole would not say just what it was that led to them to forget to land Flight 188.

"We were not asleep; we were not having an argument; we were not having a fight," Cole told the AP.

Air traffic controllers and pilots tried for more than an hour Wednesday night to contact Cole and the flight's captain, Timothy B. Cheney, of Gig Harbor, Wash., using radio, cell phone and data messages. On the ground, concerned officials alerted National Guard jets to prepare to chase the airliner from two locations, though none of the military planes left the runway.

"It was not a serious event, from a safety issue," Cole said in front of his Salem, Ore., home. "I would tell you more, but I've already told you way too much."

Unfortunately, the cockpit voice recorder may not tell the tale.

New recorders retain as much as two hours of cockpit conversation and other noise, but the older model aboard Northwest's Flight 188 includes just the last 30 minutes — only the very end of Wednesday night's flight after the pilots realized their error over Wisconsin and were heading back to Minneapolis.

Cole would not discuss why it took so long for the pilots to respond to radio calls, "but I can tell you that airplanes lose contact with the ground people all the time. It happens. Sometimes they get together right away; sometimes it takes awhile before one or the other notices that they are not in contact."

A police report released Friday said the pilots passed breathalyzer tests and were apologetic after the flight. Cheney and Cole had just started their work week and were coming off a 19-hour layover, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported Saturday, citing an internal Northwest document it said was described to the newspaper.

The police report said that the crew indicated they had been having a heated discussion about airline policy.

But aviation safety experts and other pilots were deeply skeptical they could have become so distracted by shop talk that they forgot to land an airplane carrying 144 passengers. The most likely possibility, they said, is that the pilots simply fell asleep somewhere along their route from San Diego.

"It certainly is a plausible explanation," said Bill Voss, president of the Flight Safety Foundation in Alexandria, Va.

Cheney and Cole have been suspended and are to be interviewed by National Transportation Safety Board investigators. The airline, acquired last year by Delta Air Lines, is also investigating. Messages left at Cheney's home were not returned.

FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro said in general, an unsafe condition created by a pilot could lead to the suspension of the person's pilot license and possibly a civil penalty.

With worries about terrorists still high, even after contact was re-established, air traffic controllers asked the crew to prove who they were by executing turns.

"Controllers have a heightened sense of vigilance when we're not able to talk to an aircraft. That's the reality post-9/11," said Doug Church, a spokesman for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association.

NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said fatigue and cockpit distraction will be looked into. Investigators were in the process Saturday of scheduling interviews with the pilots, he said.

Audio from the cockpit voice recorder was downloaded at NTSB headquarters on Friday, Holloway said, adding that investigators may have more information about the content on Monday.

During the flight, the pilots were finally alerted to their situation when a flight attendant called on an intercom from the cabin.

Voss said a special concern was that the many safety checks built into the aviation system to prevent incidents like this one — or to correct them quickly — apparently were ineffective until the very end. Not only couldn't air traffic controllers and other pilots raise the Northwest pilots for an hour, but the airline's dispatcher should have been trying to reach them as well. The three flight attendants onboard should have questioned why there were no preparations for landing being made. Brightly lit cockpit displays should have warned the pilots it was time to land.

"It's probably something you would say never would happen if this hadn't just happened," Voss said.

AP Airlines Writers Joshua Freed in Minneapolis and Harry R. Weber in Atlanta and AP Writers Joan Lowy in Washington, Amy Forliti in Minneapolis and Dave Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report. Cain reported from Salem, Ore.

- Associate Press
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Old October 27th, 2009, 12:12 AM   #46
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Delta Pilots Say Scheduling, Laptops Were Distracting

Oct. 26 (Bloomberg) -- Pilots told investigators they “lost track of time” as they discussed a new work-scheduling system during the Delta Air Lines Inc. flight that overshot its destination last week, a U.S. safety board said.

The two aviators used their personal laptop computers during the discussion, in violation of company policy, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a statement today. The crew told the agency that the first officer, who was more familiar with the system, gave instruction on the scheduling procedures to the captain.

The NTSB interviewed the pilots for a combined five hours yesterday in Minnesota, after controllers lost radio contact for 78 minutes on Oct. 21 and the plane overflew Minneapolis by 150 miles (241 kilometers). The pilots told the board they weren’t fatigued, didn’t doze or sleep and had a 19-hour layover in San Diego before the flight.

During the “concentrated period of discussion” about work schedules, the pilots didn’t monitor the jet or calls from controllers, though they said they heard conversations on the radio, the NTSB said.

The pilots were using cockpit speakers to listen to the conversations, not their headsets, according to the NTSB. They weren’t aware of the plane’s position until they were alerted by a flight attendant who was asking them about their estimated arrival time, the pilots said, according to the NTSB.

The pilots are Captain Timothy Cheney, 53, and First Officer Richard Cole, 54, according to information released by the Minneapolis airport police and the NTSB. The captain had 20,000 flight hours of flight experience and the first officer 11,000, according to the NTSB.

Removed From Duty

The flight by Delta’s Northwest unit was coming from San Diego and flew past the Minneapolis airport over Wisconsin before turning around and heading back to its destination, according to Houston-based flight-tracking service FlightAware.com.

The Airbus A320 was carrying 144 passengers and five crew members. The pilots have been removed from flying duty while the NTSB and Delta complete investigations.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...d=aibis4rvjni4


Gladly they had enough fuel on board. 241km *2= 482 km....does anyone knows approximately how much extra fuel is typically carried by local flights? and how much fuel is approximately required to cover this distance?

Do we have any pilot around here?
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Old October 28th, 2009, 08:18 AM   #47
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Did someone hear about...??

Today, an Indian-origin helicopter belonging to Ecuatorian Air Forces crashed at a military parade in Quito's air base.
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Old October 28th, 2009, 05:25 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayasCity View Post
Did someone hear about...??

Today, an Indian-origin helicopter belonging to Ecuatorian Air Forces crashed at a military parade in Quito's air base.
Yes read about it. It caught fire in the back(engine) and immediately fell to the ground.



Ecuador has suspended the remaining helicopters of this type.
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Old October 28th, 2009, 05:27 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayasCity View Post
Did someone hear about...??

Today, an Indian-origin helicopter belonging to Ecuatorian Air Forces crashed at a military parade in Quito's air base.
there'sa video about it, i saw it today during the launchtime news report.
they say that the pilots where only injuried, i hope it's true..
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Old October 28th, 2009, 06:09 PM   #50
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FAA grounds wayward Northwest Airlines pilots
28 October 2009

WASHINGTON (AP) - The two Northwest Airlines pilots who overshot their Minneapolis destination by 150 miles are grounded indefinitely unless the National Transportation Safety Board grants them a reprieve.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday that it had revoked the licenses of the pilots of Northwest flight 188 -- Timothy Cheney of Gig Harbor, Wash., the captain, and Richard Cole of Salem, Ore., the first officer.

The pilots have 10 days to appeal to the three-member National Transportation Safety Board, the same agency that investigates air crashes and makes safety recommendations. If an appeal fails, they can apply for a new license after one year.

The pilots told investigators they were working on their personal laptop computers and lost track of time and place last Wednesday night.

Flight 188 was out of communication for more than an hour during the incident despite repeated attempts by air traffic controllers in two states to reach the airliner, the FAA said in a statement. Northwest's dispatchers also tried eight times to contact the pilots, without response, the agency said.

The pilots violated numerous federal regulations, including failing to comply with air traffic control instructions and clearances and operating their aircraft carelessly and recklessly, the agency said.

"You engaged in conduct that put your passengers and your crew in serious jeopardy," FAA regional counsel Eddie Thomas wrote Cheney in a letter accompanying the revocation order. "NW188 was without communication with any air traffic control facility and with its company dispatcher for a period of 91 minutes (over 1.5 hours) while you were on a frolic of your own. Failing to comply with ATC clearances or instructions while engaged in air carrier operations is extremely reckless."

A similar letter was sent to Cole.

The pilots said they realized they had overshot their destination when a flight attendant contacted them on the aircraft's intercom. By then, they were over Wisconsin at 37,000 feet. They turned the Airbus A320 with its 144 passengers around and landed safely in Minneapolis.

The pilots union at Delta Air Lines, which acquired Northwest last year, declined to comment. Earlier, the union had cautioned against a rush to judgment. The pilots told investigators who interviewed them on Sunday that they had no previous accidents or safety incidents.

Delta spokesman Anthony Black said in a statement late Tuesday: "The pilots in command of Northwest Flight 188 remain suspended until the conclusion of the investigations into this incident."

Phone messages left at the homes of the pilots were not immediately returned Tuesday night.

One passenger, Lonnie Heidtke of Chippewa Falls, Wis., said he thought it was a stiff penalty for the pilots.

"I feel that the FAA pulling their license seems a little severe, I guess. But at the same time, I think they should not be flying airplanes at least for a while so they have an opportunity to think about this."

Cole and Cheney said they both had their laptops out while the first officer, who had more experience with scheduling, instructed the captain on monthly flight crew scheduling. They said they weren't listening to the radio or watching cockpit flight displays during that period. The plane's radio was also still tuned to the frequency used by Denver controllers after the San Diego-to-Minneapolis flight had flown beyond their reach.

------

AP Airlines Writer Joshua Freed in Minneapolis contributed to this report.
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Old October 29th, 2009, 09:22 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCWTC4 View Post
there'sa video about it, i saw it today during the launchtime news report.
they say that the pilots where only injuried, i hope it's true..
Yes, they were injured, though not severely. They came out walking.
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Old October 30th, 2009, 08:41 PM   #52
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U.S. Marine, Coast Guard aircraft collide, 9 missing

SAN DIEGO (Reuters) - Rescue teams searched the waters off the coast of Southern California on Friday for nine people missing after a mid-air crash of a U.S. Coast Guard plane and a Marine Corps helicopter, officials said.

The collision was reported on Thursday evening off San Clemente Island, a U.S. Navy-owned island about 68 miles west of San Diego, according to Coast Guard and Marine Corps officials.

Seven people were believed to be aboard the Coast Guard C-130 transport, and two more aboard the Marine Corps AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter when the two aircraft collided, authorities said.

The cause of the crash was not immediately known, authorities said. The Cobra crew was on a training mission at the time, authorities said.

As of dawn on Friday, pilots and sailors were searching for any survivors in and around an ocean debris field spotted between San Clemente Island and the San Diego County coast, authorities said.

"We are always hopeful. ... The assumption is always that they are alive," Marine Corps Capt. Thomas Farris said.

The weather around the crash site on Friday was clear and calm.

http://www.reuters.com/article/domes...59T39B20091030


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Old October 30th, 2009, 10:09 PM   #53
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Amazon Indians find Brazil plane crash survivors

BRASILIA, Oct 30 (Reuters) - Nine people of 11 on a small plane survived a crash landing on a river in Brazil's Amazon rain forest after native Indians notified authorities, who dispatched a rescue mission, the government said on Friday.

The military aircraft, which went missing on Thursday, was carrying four crew members and seven health officials on a vaccination campaign in remote areas of the jungle.

The survivors were in good health, Brazil's air force said in a statement. One person was missing and another still trapped in the wreckage was feared dead.

The C-98 Cessna plane landed on the Itui river, a tributary to the Javari river, in the far western Amazon region. It was not immediately clear what caused the crash.

Survivors were being taken to Cruzeiro do Sul, a town in Acre state, for medical exams, the government's Indian health organization Funasa said in a separate statement.

Members of the Matis tribe spotted the wreckage and notified local authorities. The site is close to where the borders of Brazil, Colombia and Peru meet.

The area is home to a handful of Indian tribes that have little contact with the outside world.

Indians also located and helped in the retrieval operation of a Boeing 737 operated by Brazilian carrier Gol that crashed into the Amazon in 2006, killing all 154 people on board.
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Old October 30th, 2009, 10:54 PM   #54
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http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...hD8ygD9BLJS481

Missing Amazon plane made river landing, 9 survive
By ALAN CLENDENNING (AP) – 26 minutes ago

SAO PAULO — A plane that went missing over the Amazon made an emergency river landing in a remote part of the rain forest and nine of the 11 people aboard survived, Brazil's air force said Friday.

Members of the Matis Indian tribe found the plane and the survivors in a sprawling jungle reservation, the air force said in a statement.

One person abroad the single-prop Cessna Caravan plane was missing and another may have died in Thursday's emergency, the air force said. It did not say why the plane was forced to set down on the Itui River.

Military helicopters picked up the survivors Friday afternoon at a roadless site near several Indian villages close to the Peruvian border. They were being flown to a hospital for evaluation, but Globo TV said none had life-threatening injuries.

The air force plane carried a four-person military crew and seven members of a government medical team who travel by plane and boat across the Amazon vaccinating rain forest dwellers who can't be reached any other way.

The plane took off Thursday morning from the small city of Cruzeiro do Sul in Acre state. It was scheduled to land about two hours later in the city of Tabatinga in Amazonas state.

The aircraft went down in the Vale do Javari reservation, one of Brazil's largest. The area nearly the size of Portugal is home to at least 12 tribes, some believed to have never had contact with western civilization.

Indians also helped Brazilian authorities in 2006 when a passenger jet and an executive jet collided above the Amazon, sending the jetliner crashing into the jungle and killing all 154 aboard in the nation's second biggest aviation disaster.

After authorities spotted the wreckage, Indians from two tribes helped officials reach the plane and helped clear remote stretches of forest.

Copyright © 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 11:47 AM   #55
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Russian Army Jet Crashes into Sea




A Russian military plane with at least nine people on board has crashed in the country's Far East, officials say.

They say the Tu-142 anti-submarine jet went down in the Tatar Strait during a training flight shortly after 1100 GMT.

It is not known if there were survivors in the crash, about 15km (nine miles) off the coast, although one report said some human remains had been found.

The Tu-142 is a maritime reconnaissance aircraft widely used by the Soviet navy.


RIP
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Old November 11th, 2009, 01:28 AM   #56
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Jet crash involving Tim Hortons co-founder reveals pilot problems

HALIFAX, N.S. — Most Canadian pilots are unaware of the limitations of certain guidance systems that help them land their aircraft, the Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday in a report that examined the 2007 crash of a business jet in northern Nova Scotia.

The jet, carrying Tim Hortons co-founder Ron Joyce and seven other passengers, was en route from Hamilton to Joyce's private airstrip at Fox Harb'r Resort when it started its final approach in a gusty crosswind.

The plane landed two metres short of the runway and the right landing gear plowed into a flower bed at 189 kilometres per hour and collapsed when it hit the edge of the pavement.

The jet's right wing slammed into the tarmac and the aircraft skidded on its belly for 300 metres, veering off Runway 33 and bouncing over a number of earthen mounds before grinding to a halt close to a row of luxury condos.

Joyce suffered two fractured vertebrae. The aircraft's first officer also injured his back. The captain and the other passengers sustained minor injuries.

The two pilots had limited experience flying the 14-passenger jet and were unaware that the visual, ground-based guidance system they were using wasn't suitable for the aircraft, the report said.

This is a common mistake made by pilots, the report said.

"Although most pilots are aware that different systems are in use, they are not aware of what the limitations of those (systems) are," the report said.

"Many flight crews do not know which visual landing system is appropriate for their aircraft."

The system, known as a glide slope indicator, uses red and white signal lights to show approaching pilots when they are too high or too low when coming in for a landing.

The independent agency found that the indicators at the Fox Harb'r airstrip were calibrated for aircraft smaller than Joyce's gleaming jet, a Bombardier (TSX:BBD.A) Global 5000.

Joyce had purchased it only a month earlier.

The pilots, who had flown to the resort many times before, chose an approach profile based on the smaller Bombardier Challenger, the report said.

Even though pilots should know the distance between the cockpit and the landing gear on final approach - the so-called eye-to-wheel height - that information is rarely available, the board said.

"No consideration had been given to the Global 5000's greater eye-to-wheel height and the implications of the larger aircraft flying the accustomed flight profile," the report said.

"It was determined that, in general, pilots are not aware of the (eye-to-wheel height) of the aircraft they operate. ... Furthermore, the topic of EWH is rarely addressed in any type of pilot training."

To complicate matters, the captain tried to cope with the crosswind by using a complex manoeuvre that isn't recommended for the Global 5000, and he let the aircraft fall below the minimum altitude for a safe approach, the report said.

The board also found ineffective oversight of safety regulations was a key factor behind the crash.

Private aircraft operators regulated by the Canadian Business Aviation Association were not held to the same standard as commercial airlines regulated by Transport Canada, the report said.

The federal department transferred regulatory responsibility for some aviation operators to the private association in 2003, then failed to exercise effective oversight, the board said.

While Transport Canada requires commercial airlines to implement safety management systems on a fixed timeline, the association was not held to any deadlines, the board found.

"This is a serious problem," board member Kathy Fox said in a statement.

"Safety can be compromised when ... deadlines are flexible, and critical oversight is lacking."

The safety board is recommending the association set "implementation milestones" and establish an audit system.

Joyce's plane was operated by Hamilton-based Jetport, a charter flight company he controls.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:05 PM   #57
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Rwandan plane crashes at airport, kills 1 person



KIGALI: A passenger plane with a recent history of technical problems crashed into an airport VIP lounge in Rwanda's capital, killing one passenger, airline officials said Friday.

Rwandair executive Jack Ekl said the pilot had reported technical difficulties after taking off from the Rwandan capital of Kigali on Thursday afternoon.

He said the plane tried to make an emergency landing but crashed into the VIP lounge at the airport.

Airline officials said there were 14 passengers aboard the plane.

The company's CEO, Gerald Zirimuabagabo, said the plane had shown signs of technical problems as recently as Wednesday, when a problem with the plane's generator prompted an emergency landing at the international airport in Nairobi, Kenya.

He did not say whether mechanics addressed Wednesday's technical problem before Thursday's flight.

The CRJ-100 aircraft was leased from Kenya's Jetlink.

The plane was on route to Uganda before Thursday's crash.

Zirimuabagabo said authorities from Kenya and Rwanda have launched an investigation and the airline has suspended its two other Jetlink-leased planes.

He said the airline now only has one functioning plane.
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Old November 29th, 2009, 02:35 AM   #58
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SHANGHAI — A cargo plane crashed shortly after taking off from the Pudong International Airport here on Saturday morning, killing three American crew members and injuring four others, including an American.

The plane, which was bound for Kyrgyzstan, caught fire shortly after taking off about 8:10 a.m. Saturday, according to China’s state-run news media.



The cause of the accident, which created huge delays at one of China’s largest airports, is under investigation by Chinese aviation officials. The government said that the plane was registered with Avient Aviation, based in Zimbabwe, and that the crew included an Indonesian and a citizen of Zimbabwe.

The United States Embassy in Beijing confirmed Saturday that three Americans had been killed and that another was injured. Richard L. Buangan, a spokesman for the embassy, said that the victims’ names had not been released and that the embassy was notifying their families.

State-run news media said the four survivors were in stable condition at the intensive care unit of the People’s Hospital in the Pudong section of Shanghai. Officials did not say what type of cargo was onboard the plane.
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Old December 1st, 2009, 05:20 AM   #59
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http://avherald.com/h?article=42380873

Incident: Air France A332 over Atlantic on Nov 30th 2009, Mayday call due to severe turbulence

By Simon Hradecky, created Monday, Nov 30th 2009 16:22Z, last updated Monday, Nov 30th 2009 23:06Z
An Air France Airbus A330-200, registration F-GZCK performing flight AF-445 (dep Nov 29th) from Rio de Janeiro Galeao,RJ (Brazil) to Paris Charles de Gaulle (France), was enroute at FL380 overhead the Atlantic on airway UN866 just before waypoint DEKON about 680nm northeast of Fortaleza,CE (Brazil) and 750nm southwest of Praia (Cape Verde), when the crew called Mayday on the international emergency frequency indicating, they encountered severe turbulence and were descending to a lower altitude. The airplane was seen enroute at FL280 overhead France and landed safely at Paris Charles de Gaulle 6:40 hours after the emergency call.
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Old December 11th, 2009, 06:29 PM   #60
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Experts investigate Air France distress call about turbulence on November Rio-Paris flight
10 December 2009

PARIS (AP) - French aviation investigators are examining an emergency distress call from an Air France flight hit by turbulence last month, saying it could shed light on the June crash of a plane heading from Rio de Janeiro to Paris.

Air France Flight 445 made it through heavy turbulence on November 29 as it flew from Rio to Paris. That was the same route, the same airline and same aircraft type -- an Airbus A330-200 -- as Air France Flight 447, which plunged into the Atlantic on June 1, killing all 228 people on board.

France's accident investigation agency BEA said its probe of last month's incident could help explain why the June flight went down.

French newspaper Le Figaro reported Thursday that pilots in November made the distress call when the plane was just 10 nautical miles from the area where the ill-fated jet went down months earlier.

Flight 447 jet was flying from Rio de Janeiro to Paris when it went down about 930 miles (1,500 kilometers) off Brazil's mainland and out of radar coverage. Investigators have not yet solved the crash.

In a Dec. 1 statement, Air France said an internal investigation found that about four hours into the November flight, the pilots carried out a "normal descent" to avoid a zone of severe turbulence. The pilots sent an emergency radio call to indicate that the jet was leaving its flight altitude level, Air France said.

The flight, with 215 people on board, experienced moderate to heavy turbulence for half an hour then continued on normally, said the carrier.

Flight 447 was Air France's deadliest crash. Investigators may never determine what happened because months of searches in the Atlantic did not turn up the flight recorders.
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