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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:28 AM   #5601
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CBSE goes international

BANGALORE: This year, students studying in Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) schools aspiring to go abroad after schooling can be rest assured about their international exposure. Thanks to the new CBSE-i, an international curriculum that is designed to help students with admissions in foreign education institutions after Class 12.
As part of a pilot project, this year by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), the international course has been introduced in 50 Kendriya Vidyalayas and public schools affiliated to CBSE in India.
Schools affiliated to the CBSE here have welcomed the move, with many planning to subscribe to the CBSE-i.
“It is a fact that children are going abroad after schooling. The CBSE-i will definitely help them move out and adapt to the foreign curriculums,” said M Srinivasan, Principal, Gear Innovative School.
The international curriculum was launched in 2010 across 26 schools in classes 1 and 9 in the United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Japan, Malaysia and other Gulf countries to provide a less expensive and quality-oriented alternative to foreign boards like International Baccalaureate (IB) and International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE).
In 2011, the curriculum was extended to Classes 2, 6 and 10. This year, it will be extended to Classes 2, 7 and 11.
Usha Mohan, principal, India International School, which is planning to introduce the Inter Baccalaureate, said that the CBSE-i would expose students to global standards. “The CBSE has undergone several changes over the years. In my opinion, the CBSE-i will be instrumental in making students employable abroad. Also, its certification is valid in foreign countries,” she said.
“The course will be based on Geneva’s International Baccalaureate (IB). I am not sure how the IB will gear up to India minds. But the CBSE-i also takes into consideration the Indian minds. The base is still the National Curriculum Framework (NCF) and it will be easier for students to migrate,” said Shanthi Menon, principal, The Deens Academy.
While the CBSE-i is certain to help students experience a smooth shift from an Indian schooling framework to pursue higher education abroad, questions of bias towards the elite students have been raised.
“Foreign education is not the prerogative of the elite class alone. Even students from the middle class are studying abroad. The CBSE-i would help integrate the existing CBSE with international education,” added Menon.

source:http://expressbuzz.com/cities/bangal...al/363916.html
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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:30 AM   #5602
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Experts debate teaching English as 2nd language

BANGALORE: “Teach comprehension. Don’t teach production. The worst teaching is routinization,” was renowned teacher trainer Dr N S Prabhu’s advise to English teachers on the second day of the All India Seminar on ‘Second Language Teacher Education -Issues and Challenges’ on Wednesday at the Regional Institute of English, South India.
Underlining the relationship between comprehension and production, the former senior fellow of the English and Literature Department at National University of Singapore observed that there would be no production without comprehension. “The notion that learning becomes easier with comprehensible input that is easy is not true. For instance, if you make food easily digestible, then the digestive system will have no work,” said Dr Prabhu.
Taking a critical look at the present pedagogical approach to teaching English as a second language, he said there is no ‘ideal’ method for a classroom situation. “One of our problems in this profession is that we are looking for methods that work everywhere. Don’t routinize teaching. It is not ideal for every teacher to follow the same method. Only when everyone is groping to see what works, that is more valuable,” said Dr Prabhu.
Dr Prabhu urged the teachers of English to put children in a situation where they are likely to make an effort to learn. However, he added, “The idea that learning happens only with learners’ effort is false. Teachers have to be effective in their teaching. While no two children can learn at the same pace, teachers could use the rule of thumb. If half the class gets half the answer right, then effort is in the right level. If all got the answer right, it means something is wrong.”

source:http://expressbuzz.com/cities/bangal...ge/363919.html
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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:41 AM   #5603
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An industrial park with a community focus

“Over 40 per cent of the employees working in the IT park use public transport”

For years now, one of India's largest industrial parks, spread over 330 acres in two villages on Bangalore's outskirts, has been lobbying for ‘township' status.

Though these plans have not yet materialised, Electronics City has over the years grown into a landmark of global importance — one that is home to big names in IT , both domestic and global, and hosts a plethora of small and medium IT and BPO businesses.

The two villages, Konappana Agrahara and Doddathogur, where the three phases of this park is established, of course, have seen unimaginable changes over the years.

While large glass and chrome buildings took over the landscape, other changes included soaring land prices, a rapid change of demographics, and speedy growth in infrastructure both within and around the area.

Over the years, since the Electronics City Industries' Association (ELCIA) took over from government body Keonics in 1997, the park, led by IT conglomerates has focussed not only on building facilities and common infrastructure for those within the park, but also to touch the lives of those living around the park.

So while elevated roads, crèches and better public transport made things better for those working inside the campus, IT companies, under the aegis of ELCIA, charted out a plan for corporate social responsibility that ranged from helping schools in villages nearby to providing clean drinking water to localities that border them. N.S. Rama, CEO, ELCIA, explains that these programmes have happened with the will of large IT companies that established the trust that carries out these activities.

Mid-day meals

Among these are financing the mid-day meal scheme for 5,000 students in government schools, computer education schemes in government schools, contributing to infrastructure, and planting saplings, she explains. She also says that it is a “proud fact” that over 40 per cent of the employees working here use public transport. This is apart from the companies that have private chartered buses and other services.

This is a unique thing, and is part of what ELCIA and the companies here do to build community focus towards sustainable growth, she adds.

source:http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/...cle2896223.ece
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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:42 AM   #5604
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An elevated way of life



Bommanahalli, Hebbagodi, Singasandra, Chandapura and Attibele were all once out-and-out villages on Hosur Road, but today they are no more classified as villages. Connectivity, real estate projects and high-end IT offices have brought in growth, movement and progress to these areas.

Among the prominent realty sections of Bangalore, this massive stretch of Hosur Road, which begins right from Vellara Junction, through Koramangala and Silk Board going all the way up to Attibele is certainly up for lots of development. City and Neighbourhood spoke to Mahesh Khaitan, Head, Sattva Real Estate Solutions, the real estate research wing of Sattva Group, to evaluate the stretch better.

These are rather traditional areas that have suddenly woken up. Has the IT belt helped the development in this area?

If one were to look at the central business district areas in Bangalore, you will agree that they are saturated and that the expansion of the city is now moving to the outskirts, especially to those areas that were once perceived as villages.

Hosur Road that stretches all the way to Bommanahalli and Attibele, still has ample tracts of land that is now being converted into residential property. Landmarks such as the old MICO factory and Bhandary Steel have been converted into residential properties. This has completely changed the landscape of the area and the mindset of the people living here. Attibele, thanks to its proximity to Electronics City is witnessing the development of budget apartments to house the constant influx of IT professionals who would rather live close to work.

The same goes for Chandapura, which is just 6 km from Electronics City and is developing into what Jayanagar is to M.G. Road office-goers.

What are the infrastructural developments that have helped these areas?

The biggest boost to the area has been the BETL elevated expressway which has drastically cut down travel time.

For example, to commute from Koramangala to Electronics City isn't a bother because of this expressway.

The only bottlenecks are Silk Board and Madivala.

With the corporation looking into it and with hopes of that being taken care of, travel time will not be an issue anymore. Besides, a number of big names in the IT industry are planning to start operations on the stretch. Companies such as Infosys and Biocon have, of course, already been there for a while. All this will give a huge impetus to budget homes.

What is the profile of the kind of projects coming up here?

Infosys was the biggest IT company that set base and started the spurt of budget housing in these areas, as recent as five years ago. Even today, builders selling homes in the Rs. 50 to Rs. 60 lakh category will rethink the proposition. The kind of apartments that are in demand are those that are high on necessary fittings without too many frills. Well-planned homes, proximity to basic necessities and green space for children are some of the aspects being looked into. Budget for such homes are still only Rs. 30 to Rs. 40 lakh. With the possibility of bigger companies coming to Electronics City, the area is already seeing an appreciation in prices of up to 25 per cent.

Large tracts of land are now coming up for sale in Electronics City and these are being bought out from village people in the area. There are certain bureaucratic issues related to this that need to be ironed out.

The one hitch with the development of this area is that there is no parallel road to Electronics City and Hosur Road, leaving very little scope for development in any of the areas beyond the main roads of Hosur.

source:http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/...cle2896188.ece
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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:46 AM   #5605
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The many tales of two Bangalores



“Bangalore gives me the anonymity and freedom that I need as a writer. Although I was born and raised in Maharashtra, I have lived in this city for over 20 years and it has also appeared in one of my novels,” shared Saniya, a Marathi author of 15 books from Bangalore who was one of the panellists at the inaugural discussion at Lekhana, a weekend literary festival, where they spoke about ‘The City in Literature'.

During the course of the discussion, Bangalore-based writers Anjum Hasan, Zac O'Yeah, K.R. Usha, and Saniya explored how the city influenced them and featured in their work. It also set the pace of the the discussion which attracted authors, poets, journal editors, litterateurs and students from the city as well as from around the world.

Refreshingly, authors who write in languages other than English were also invited to participate in the literary gathering.

Viewpoints

Moderating the discussion, noted film critic and scholar M.K. Raghavendra, spoke about how Kannada movies portrayed only certain parts of Bangalore such as Jayanagar and Srirampuram, while leaving out areas like Indiranagar, M.G. Road, Ulsoor and Koramangala.

“Bangalore has no iconic spots such as Marine Drive in Mumbai. The city breeds no loyalties,” he added. However, members of the audience disagreed with him. Instead of comparing Bangalore to other cities, we must consider the intriguing aspects of the city like its diversity, its weather and its greenery, the audience said.

Liberation

Revealing that all her books were published here, noted novelist and poet Anjum Hasan, who has been living in the city for around 11 years, said, “Bangalore is an escape that gives the young a sense of liberation, as captured in my work Neti, Neti. The city does not judge a person by his or her antecedents but by what the person does. It provides writers many opportunities to recreate life as one experiences it.”

Zac O'Yeah, popular travel and fiction writer and a resident of Sanjaynagar who appreciated Bangalore's vibrancy and its cosmopolitan beat remarked insightfully, “Namma Metro is new to ‘old' Bangaloreans like me, but may be emblematic to the current generation.”

Short story writer Usha K.R. whose Monkey-Man is set in the city and writer U.R. Ananthamurthy, who admitted to never having written about this metropolis, reminded listeners about the perceived distinction between Bangalore and Bengaluru. They focussed on the lives of the dispossessed and displaced whose needs, they said, were increasingly being ignored by the city.

The weekend literary fest took place between February 10 and 12 at the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) and the Smriti Nandan Cultural Centre (SNCC) on Palace Road.

source:http://www.thehindu.com/arts/books/article2896237.ece
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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:49 AM   #5606
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Going that extra mile for a good bargain



The patrons of this Saturday market range from techies from Electronics City to those living in the suburbs


On an early Saturday morning, the otherwise busy and mostly congested route to Bommanahalli is more or less asleep, marking the much-awaited weekend break in the software hub, Electronics City, which is just kilometres away. However, a small suburb, on the other side of Electronics City, comes alive every Saturday.

At the break of dawn, Chandapura, not very far from Bommanahalli, bustles with activity, while it prepares to host the ‘Shanivara Santhe' (Saturday market).

Makeshift market

On this day, buyers and sellers from Bangalore and the nearby towns flock to Chandapura as early as 4 a.m. to participate in the one-day market. Why Saturday? Because it is Jigani's turn on a Sunday, Bannerghatta's on Tuesday, Anekal's on Friday and as tradition would have it, Chandapura's turn is on Saturday.

Rajamma is one among the many buyers and sellers who assemble early in the day, sometimes even on the previous night, to set up their stalls in the makeshift market area that starts at the Chandapura Circle stretching across the vast expanse of land on the left side of the highway. At the crack of dawn, she buys coconuts from sellers, generally from Tamil Nadu, and carries them to her stall.

Sellers like her buy vegetables and other produce either from farmers who come early in the morning to the market only to sell their produce and leave, or from the wholesale markets at Yeshwanthpur and Bommanahalli. “We hire a truck on Monday and Tuesday to buy onions from the wholesale markets at Yeshwanthpur and then travel from one santhe to the next selling them,” said Gopal Reddy, from Anekal.

Rajamma and Gopal Reddy have to pay a ‘gate fare' to occupy a stall in the santhe. “Each year, the Chandapura Panchayat conducts an auction where tenders are floated to manage the market area. The price at which the tender is sold determines the gate fare for each seller. For example, if the tender is sold at Rs. 10 lakh, then that amount is divided over 12 months to arrive at the gate fare for each seller,” explained Gopal.

The gate fare also largely depends on the quantity sold by each seller. “We (onion sellers) have to pay Rs. 950 as gate fare because we sell large quantities of onions. But other vegetable sellers have to pay around Rs. 300 to Rs. 350 and coconut sellers Rs. 200 to Rs. 250. It also depends on the size of the stall,” he added.

Loopholes

While there is an extensive system in place with each market agent playing a definitive role, it is not devoid of loopholes.

“The ones who collect gate fares collect much more than the fixed fare and most of it goes into their pockets. If the gate fare is Rs. 65, sometimes they collect up to Rs. 200. The panchayat is not strong enough to oppose this practice. We have tried to talk about this issue with them but the sellers have had no respite from such exploitation,” said Anand Kumar, secretary, Chandapura Santhe Vyaparigala Sangha.

This weekly market, however, works well for other reasons. According to Anand , transactions of up to Rs. 1 crore are carried out at the santhe and he qualifies this statement by saying “it is good business”. With the highway by the side, the location is convenient for both buyers and sellers.

For the techies that live around Electronics City, the market rids them of the need to take time out for grocery shopping during the week. “I come here every Saturday and buy a week's supply of vegetables. For those who work in factories, this weekend market works well,” said Muniyappa, a newspaper agent.

Roshan, who has a truck of his own, transports vegetables from other markets to this one and earns about Rs. 600 per commute.

“Today, I've brought tomatoes from the market in Hosur. My job is to transport vegetables and other groceries from one market to another. This system works for me,” he said.

source:http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/...cle2896214.ece
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Old February 16th, 2012, 07:54 AM   #5607
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The cool cucumber loves some warmth



If space is a constraint, cucumbers can be grown vertically by using stakes

Next to onions, tomatoes and cabbage, cucumber is the fourth most widely cultivated vegetable in the world. It has been farmed in India for over 4,000 years and large genetic varieties of cucumber have been observed in different parts of India.

There are strong indications that cucumber was first cultivated in India, following which it spread to the Middle East, Europe and reached America in the 1500s.

Basically, there are two types of cucumbers — those that we slice and eat, and the other variety which we use for pickling, called gherkins. India grows a large amount of gherkins mainly for export and it is rarely seen in the local markets. The slicing cucumber can also be used for pickling if picked young.

Warm and tropical

The cucumber plant loves warmth and does well in the tropical climate the whole year through. It needs adequate sunlight, well-drained soil and plenty of water. To grow cucumber, dig a pit and put in plenty of compost and well-rotted manure in 30-cm square pits 30-cm deep. Keep the mounds 90 cm apart. Push two or three seeds in each mound to a depth of 2 cm down into the soil. When the seedlings have produced two or three leaves, retain the healthiest plant and remove the rest.

Stages of growth

If space is a constraint to let them spread on the ground, provide stakes or a trellis and grow them vertically. Pinching out the growing tips encourages branching and increases flower and fruit production. Side dress the plants once it starts flowering.

Cucumber plants have a high requirement of water. The roots are very shallow and require ample soil moisture at all stages of growth. If you have ever bitten into a bitter cucumber, you know it is not something you would want to do again. The bitterness in cucumber is believed to be due to lack of watering. Misshapen fruits, also caused by lack of water, tend to be more bitter. From planting to harvesting, cucumbers take about 60 to 70 days. Pick them when they are tender and crunchy. They are at their best when just about 20 cm long. Regular picking promotes continued production. With its high water content, it is an ideal vegetable for the summer.

Hybrid seeds

Powdery mildew, a common pest in cucumber, may be seen on the leaves. Most of the hybrid seeds sold in the market are now treated against it. A small fruit that turns yellow and falls from the plant has probably not successfully pollinated.

Cucumber is a very low-calorie vegetable and provides just 15 calories for 100 grams. It is a good source of potassium. Thanks to its cooling property, slices of cucumber are placed on irritated skin, and over tired eyes. It is used extensively in skin care in face packs and facials.
'
source:http://www.thehindu.com/life-and-sty...cle2896245.ece
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Old February 17th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #5608
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engineer.akash View Post
yes saw on bing,Mysore is not updated it is showing 2000 imagery
TRy http://www.flashearth.com/
I guess Jan 2011 images.
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Old February 18th, 2012, 08:55 AM   #5609
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Hrudayalaya, RedBus among top innovators

BANGALORE: Two Bangalore companies have made it to the list of the world's top 50 most innovative companies drawn up by US business magazine Fast Company.

While Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospitals has been ranked the 36th most innovative company for changing the face of health delivery in India, online booking platform RedBus has been rated 48th for making bus ticketing and routing easy for passengers and operators alike.

The magazine singles out Narayana Hrudayalaya's efforts towards driving down costs and accommodating the poorest of the poor. Describing Narayana Hrudayalaya as "Wal-Mart meets Mother Teresa", the magazine says hospital's Sanskrit name translates into "God's compassionate home".

The hospital offers low-cost, highquality specialty care in a largely impoverished country of 1.2 billion people, it points out.

About Redbus, the magazine says: "Several years ago, on a busy holiday weekend, Phanindra Sama actually ran after some Indian bus operators in a failed attempt to catch a bus home."

Fast Company, the US magazine, praises RedBus for bringing a huge change in the way tickets are booked. "Customers can view open seats from multiple operators, purchase tickets, and post ratings. Meanwhile, bus operators can track seat availability in real time, and travel agents can pre-book passengers. RedBus tripled sales last year, adding 4.25 million riders," the magazine says.

"Narayana Hrudayalaya's operations include the world's largest and most prolific cardiac hospital where the average open-heart surgery runs less than $2,000, a third or less of what it costs elsewhere in India and a fraction of what it costs in the US," Fast Company says.

Two other Bangalore companies, Wipro and Flipkart, figure among India's top most 10 innovative companies.

The magazine - launched in November 1995 and managed by Alan Webber and Bill Taylor, two former Harvard Business Review editors - says that "by thinking differently about everything, from the unusually high number of patients it treats to the millions for whom it provides insurance, and by thinking a lot like the world's largest retailer, the hospital group is able to continually wring out costs".

source:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...w/11920912.cms
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Old February 18th, 2012, 08:57 AM   #5610
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You can shop while waiting for your bus

BANGALORE: That endless wait for public transport is likely to be livened up soon with movie viewing and shopping binges. Thanks to a BMTC endeavour, bus depots at Hebbal, Jayanagar 9th Block and Kathriguppe will get a makeover with traffic and transit management centres (TTMCs) housing swanky malls and commercial establishments. BMTC will call for bids to develop the three depots into transportation hubs as a PPP endeavour and design, build, finance, operate and transfer (DBFOT) basis.

COMPLETE MAKEOVER "We are unlocking the land value of BMTC assets. These TTMCs will be equipped with adequate bus bays and parking facilities, besides exploring commercial opportunities," said KR Sreenivasa, MD, BMTC.

"The proposal has attracted the attention of infrastructure companies and developers. Ramky Infrastructure, for instance, has won the bid to build and manage Hebbal depot through a competitive bidding process," a company official said.

Concession period for the project is 30 years, which can be extended by another 30. The 7.95-acre Hebbal depot is located at the intersection of NH7 and Outer Ring Road. Hebbal TTMC is estimated to cost a whopping Rs 300 crore with provision of 9 lakh sqft area earmarked for commercial and retail operations.

BMTC has already developed 10 TTMCs at Yeshwantpur, Jayanagar, Shantinagar, Koramangala, Domlur, Whitefield, Vijayanagar, Bannerghatta and Kengeri at a whopping cost of Rs 482 crore from JNNURM funds.

TO BOOST BMTC COFFERS "Annually we earn Rs 35 crore from the 10 TTMCs and expect to clear JNNURM debt. Now, we are planning to build 35 more TTMCs across the city on a PPP model," said Sreenivasa.

"The royalty-based dry rental model in older TTMCs hasn't been successful in generating adequate revenue. The commercially more relevant terms being offered now to develop new terminals will boost BMTC's coffers," said Prashanth Sambargi, partner at Mars Realty.

The PPP model for the new TTMCs focuses on making barren land, where buses were parked and repaired, commercially more viable. "The model is a win-win situation for both the developer and BMTC. We are exploring opportunities to develop retail spaces in some good locations. The corporation can exploit the floor space index to its potential to generate additional revenue" said Raj Menda, MD of RMZ Corp.

Nitesh Shetty, CMD, Nitesh Estates, told TOI they are exploring one or two options proposed under the PPP route.

BMTC is also conducting a feasibility study to examine if Electronics City and Yelahanka depots, too, can be converted into TTMCs under the PPP model.

What's the project about? TTMCs are a vital cog in any city's urban infrastructure. Parking and other facilities will help commuters interchange between different modes of transportation. The proposed TTMCs will house a fuelling station, administration building, washing area and maintenance workshop. These facilities should be created within two years of signing the contract.

The commercial space should be developed within five years of commencement of the contract. The concessionaire will have to pay BMTC an upfront fee of Rs 10 crore and fixed annuity of Rs 1 crore for the concession period. BMTC MD KR Sreenivasa said whoever pays a higher annuity will get the offer on approval from the government.

source:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...w/11920754.cms
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:13 PM   #5611
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Using more power? Bescom will come knocking at your door



The Bangalore Electricity Supply Company (Bescom), in an unprecedented move, has launched an awareness-cum-inspection drive to help reduce the pressure on the power grid during peak hours.


According to Bescom, the City, a major power guzzler, has around 4.5 lakh commercial establishments which record illegal power consumption of 12 per cent.

Starting February 11, around 100 teams belonging to 150 sub-divisions have been visiting commercial establishments across the City to ascertain whether each customer is drawing power more than the sanctioned load.

The target is to inspect 900 installations everyday between 6 pm and 9 pm.

What’s also unique about the drive is that the entire workforce of Bescom has volunteered to work overtime - without demanding any incentive.

Chief Engineer Bescom Ashok Angadi told Deccan Herald that the company was particular not to effect load-shedding this summer.

“To avoid load-shedding, we decided to launch a drive that will help bring down the load during peak hours. Teams have begun to visit individual installations. If the owner is found to be consuming more than the sanctioned power, he/she will be issued a notice to immediately regularise the consumption,” he added.

Teams of five officials comprising assistant engineer and joint engineer and three linemen, headed by an assistant executive engineer will go door to door in commercial areas after their office hours.

C K Sreenath, Assistant Executive Engineer, E-3 sub-division, MG Road, who inspected installations on Church Street on Friday, said that the teams were given a set format to work with.

He said so far his team had visited around 100 of 41,600 installations in his sub-division, and that around 10 per cent of the consumers were found to be flouting the norms.

“Of the 20 installations we visit every day, two to three of them have been drawing additional power. We tabulate the power consumed, verify it with the information available with us, and issue a notice to the violator the following day. We give them 30 days to regularise the excess consumption, or stop the usage. In the event the consumer fails to abide by this, officials have been instructed to disconnect the entire installation,” he said.

Sreenath said the exercise was turning out to be rather effective.

“Initially, we were very apprehensive – we weren’t sure if the consumers would cooperate. At first, they are a little wary, but once we tell them the intention behind the exercise, they are very cooperative. We are in a crisis, but load-shedding should stop becoming the only solution to the problem,” he added.

Sreenath also said high power consumers like ITC Gardenia and UB City had set the ball rolling by cooperating with Bescom.

“ITC which consumes 2000 KV power, has agreed to cut down the usage by 50 per cent during the evening peak hours, and UB City too has agreed to bring down its consumption from 5.5 MW to 3 MW everyday. This has really eased in on the situation,” he added.

Facebook

Bescom is not stopping at conducting inspections drives. The company, which has its own profile on Facebook, has in fact started making appeals to the consumers through the social networking sites.

Bescom in its appeal has requested its consumers to a) reduce lighting in parking and yard areas; b) stop using downward escalators; c) use captive power during peak hours; d) reduce decorative lights; and e) reduce lighting in advertisement hoardings.

source:http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...scom-come.html
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:16 PM   #5612
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Know IT, else no promotion, govt tells its employees

Cabinet decides to cut increments of computer illiterates
The State Cabinet on Friday decided to make it compulsory for a large section of government employees to equip themselves with working computer knowledge and pass a computer literacy test (CLT) to be eligible for future promotions and annual increments.


Briefing reporters after the Cabinet meeting, Law Minister Suresh Kumar said employees who would be recruited directly to government service hereafter shall have to pass CLT, to be conducted by their respective departments, within three months of joining the service.

In service government employees below 50 years will have to pass the CLT to prove that they have acquired working computers knowledge within the next three years. “If they do not pass the test within three years, they will not be eligible for promotion and if they remain computer illiterate even after four years their annual increments will be withheld,” Suresh Kumar said.

In order to motivate its employees to acquire computer knowledge, those who pass the test will be provided one time incentive of Rs 5,000.

Those already serving but crossed 50 years of age would be exempted from mandatory computer learning.

However, the scheme is not mandatory for Group D employees and certain categories of employees such as primary school teachers, nurses, police constables, drivers, forest guards, excise guards and health workers. In all, around four lakh government employees will have to equip themselves with computer knowledge.

Cases withdrawn

In another major decision, the Cabinet decided to withdraw 29 police cases filed against 200 farmers during various agitations from 2004 in the districts of Dharwad, Davanagere, Mandya, Bangalore Rural, Raichur, Bagalkot and Shimoga.

The cases had been registered when the farmers were agitating against fertilizer shortage, land acquisition, unscientific pricing for paddy, power cuts among others, Suresh Kumar said.

The Cabinet also approved a proposal from the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) to acquire land in Nelamangala, Bangalore Rural district to raise a battalion. Suresh Kumar said that CISF planned to spend Rs 100 crore on the proposal and the necessary land of 55 acres 36 guntas would be allotted to them at the market rate of Rs 27.75 crore
In another decision, the Cabinet gave its nod for construction of a building in Bangalore to house the Karnataka Information Commission (KIC) at a cost of Rs 17 crore. The building will come up between Multi-Storied Building and Karnataka Public Service Commission.

Eagleton

The Cabinet also decided to take back 55 acre land allotted to Eagleton Golf Village owned by Chamundeshwari Buildtech Pvt Ltd and charge market value for another 71 acre 16 gunta from the builders as per the direction of the Supreme Court.

Other decisions

* Cabinet committee constituted to study recommendations made by the Justice B K Somashekar Commission of Inquiry constituted to probe attack on churches in State. Committee to submit report in one month.
* Govt school in Yelahanka to be shifted to make way for BMTC bus station. BMTC to pay Rs one crore to the school development & monitoring committee.
* Approval for improvement of State Highway 88 between Mysore and Bantawal (219 km) at a cost of Rs 538 crore
* Approval for construction of multi-storied residential cum commercial complex at Vijayanagar in Bangalore for employees of KHB at a cost of Rs 22 crore
* Construction of  ring road between Kanakadasa Road and Hampi Road in Hospet City at a cost of Rs nine crore

source:http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...tion-govt.html
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:18 PM   #5613
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Get around city with click of a mouse

Travelling will become a lot easier in the city once the multi-objective transit system is up and running in the next two months. All a user has to do is log on to the website and enter the origin and destination of travel. In seconds the website will throw up route, mode of transport available, and also the distance. The multi-objective transit trip itinerary planning system, to give it its full name, uses the Geographic Information System (GIS). It is funded by the Centre for Infrastructure, Sustai-nable Transportation and Urban Planning (CiS-TUP).

Governmental agencies were not associated with the project, though BMTC provided the necessary and available data. “We anticipate the system will go live in about two months as we still have to work out the modalities of hosting this system on an appropriate server and at an appropriate place etc,” said the investigator of the project, Dr Ashish Verma of CiSTUP.

As part of the project, a transit passenger information system (PIS) was developed for the city. The aim of the project is to help users plan their trips using the multimodal public transport network of Bengaluru. It recognises that different groups of passengers might have different needs, that is, some might want to minimise the cost of the trip, others might want to walk or wait as little as possible, still others might want to cut down the number of modal transfers. In order to consider the different objectives, this study uses a multi-objective methodology and a generalised cost approach from journey origin to destination.

“The PIS has been developed using a multi-objective generalised cost methodology. Using this system, travellers can get a plan for their journey by entering the origin and destination points. The system integrates public modes of transport like Namma Metro and bus with non-motorised transportation like walking, to output trip itinerary information,” explains Dr Verma.

The project applies to the whole public transport network of the city and covers the currently operational metro route, and all Volvo and BIG 10 routes. CiSTUP plans to add the other category BMTC routes also in due course.

source:http://www.deccanchronicle.com/chann...lick-mouse-227
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:19 PM   #5614
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Want a dance? Ship it to city
Drew Smith, an American musician, used a dance school in namma Bengaluru to make a video for his song “Smoke and Mirrors”, following the route of big businesses to get a job done well — outsourcing to India.

Last October, Mr Smith contracted a dance school in Bengaluru to make a video for his song Smoke and Mirrors featuring original Bollywood-style choreography and Indian actors dressed as Hindu demigods and tossing coloured festival powder.

The production values may be a little amateurish by MTV standards, but for $2,000 it cost a small fraction of the typical budget for a professional film. And Mr Smith has attracted some of music’s most important currency: attention. Since being posted to YouTube on Feb. 2 Smoke and Mirrors has been watched more than 179,000 times, and a recent post about it by Mr Smith’s brother became one of the top articles on Reddit, the social link aggregator.

“You hear so much about big corporations outsourcing”, Mr Smith said by phone on a break from his day job teaching English to immigrants in Hamilton, Ontario. “I was just trying to think of a unique way to release the album and promote it.” Mr Smith, a soft-spoken 31-year-old who has released two albums of mellow, moody songs vaguely reminiscent of Coldplay, said “the absurdity” of outsourcing his music video appealed to him, in addition to the reduced costs.

He did a quick Web search for virtual assistants — business intermediaries, often from English-speaking countries like India or the Philippines, who will perform almost any task for a price — and was connected to Asha Sarella, a young assistant for hire who also teaches at a dance school in Bengaluru.

Sensing an opportunity, Ms Sarella gathered a few friends and quoted Mr Smith a price to cover her expenses; part of the deal was that Mr Smith would credit Ms Sarella and help promote her work. After paying her half upfront, Mr Smith sent the recording and his lyrics, and gave her carte blanche. “The only thing I requested was Bollywood dancing”, Mr. Smith said. “Everything else was up to her”.

Ms. Sarella, who in 2005 achieved a modicum of outsourcing fame when she was one of the virtual assistants featured in an Esquire magazine article about exported work, said she welcomed the opportunity to do something more creative than the data-entry work or chores for distant executives that she has typically done as a virtual assistant. The Smoke and Mirrors video was shot in three days, she said, and the completed film was in Mr Smith's inbox in three weeks. As the play count on the video started to climb, the promotional effect on Mr Smith’s music was immediate. Within two days the song had been downloaded 1,000 times.

source:http://www.deccanchronicle.com/chann...ip-it-city-224
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:22 PM   #5615
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Get ready to smile: Traffic cops to click in Bengaluru

The traffic police will now “aim and shoot” the offenders to avoid any arguments over paying the fines at traffic junctions.

Around 400 digital cameras will now be given to beat constables at these junctions, who will photograph the violations if need be.

The camera will help policemen streamline the flow of traffic at junctions which sometimes can go awry. Recent incidents where traffic policemen have been at the receiving end has prompted the traffic police officers to take steps to avoid such incidents.

M.A. Saleem, Additional Commissioner of Police (Traffic), told Deccan Chronicle that the cameras will be made available in a few weeks and the digitised data stored in the cameras will be used while filing cases.

“There are a number of instances where the violators argue with the traffic police that they did not even travel on the road on the day when the violation occurred. As this is the common argument, we try to provide them with photographs obtained from junction cameras. But new digital cameras will help the police to have photos of those who are involved in road rage, attacks on officers etc,” Mr Saleem said.

A traffic constable was happy with the new project. “It’s better we (traffic police) have additional proof when it comes to violations. Most drunk drivers, when they approach the police the next day, argue that they never misbehaved with policemen the previous night. But only when we show them the video footage, will they know the truth,” he added.

The traffic police have also made video-recording of drunk driving drives compulsory after attacks on traffic policemen have increased. “There are stringent rules under IPC for attacks on police officers. The violators can be booked under IPC 307 or attempt to murder,” Mr Saleem noted.

source:http://www.deccanchronicle.com/chann...-bengaluru-969
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:35 PM   #5616
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Karnataka govt to hold 'International wine festival' from March 2

In its bid to espouse the cause of Karnataka Grapes economy, the state government will be holding the three-day 'International Wine Festival - 2012' in the city from March 2.

Briefing newspersons Additional Chief Secretary and Karnataka Wine Board (KWB) Chairman Subhir Hari Singh said the festival will focus on creating awareness about grapes and wine amongst farmers, entrepreneurs and the general public and provide global exposure to wineries within the state. It also facilitates technological tie-up's between domestic entrepreneurs and foreign wine makers during the festival.

'Karnataka is the second biggest grapes grower in the country after Maharashtra. We have observed the growth of wine consumption linked to growth of the GDP and this being a non-alcoholic drink and its potential to bring good revenues to the state's farmer, the government will provide necessary boost to the wine industry,' he said.

In all 50 wineries, including 10 international players, will participate in the event which offers technical sessions for all stakeholders and exclusive business sessions to foster trade. Wine tasting session is also planned to promote wine consumption. (UNI)

source:http://www.newkerala.com/news/2011/w...ws-160188.html
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:36 PM   #5617
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US healthcare IT firm expanding India operations

Bangalore, Feb 16 : Major US healthcare IT firm Allscripts is expanding its India operations to deliver healthcare information solutions to hospitals and physicians for improving patient care, the company said Thursday.

"We are expanding our solutions’ development centres in Bangalore, Pune and Baroda to create innovative solutions for healthcare professionals to improve patient care,” Allscripts vice-president Cliff Meltzer said in a statement here.

In addition, the company will hire about 300 development professionals this year at lateral, mid and entry levels to spur growth and enhance operational efficiency.

“Our game plan is to build a world-class solutions development organisation by focusing on right people, key solutions and best practices to deliver industry-leading solutions capabilities, performance and innovation,” Meltzer said.

By hosting key clients in India, the company wants healthcare experts to see first-hand how it develops solutions they use.

“We would like to hear directly from our clients how our solutions work in action to provide the best patient care,” Allscripts India operations president Nitin Deshpande said in the statement.

According to Cancer Treatment Centres of America (CTCA), which treats patients for complex cancer disease at its facilities in Chicago, Philadelphia, Tulsa and Phoenix, Allscripts solutions provide access to a single patient record, ensuring up-to-date information and streamlining patient care

source:http://www.newkerala.com/news/2011/w...ws-159882.html
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:39 PM   #5618
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Mysore division unveils its model railroad layout



The layout, spread over 200 sq. ft, showcases miniature working models of trains and landscape


Depicting the railway system in the Mysore division on a smaller scale, the model railroad layout — reckoned to be the first in the country — was thrown open to the public here on Friday.

The concept is a rage in advanced countries and entails showcasing miniature working models of locomotives, trains, signalling system, complete with the route and the surroundings.

The rail network in the Mysore division is depicted in the model with focus on Mysore, with a working model of an imaginary rail system in Kodagu too, even though Kodagu is not served by the Railways yet.

The scale models include the rolling stock, tracks, hillocks, bridges, tunnels, roads and some of the popular landmarks of Mysore and surrounding regions, including the palace, the Lalitha Mahal, St. Philomena's Church, the Krishnaraja Sagar, Chamundi Hills and the temple, K.R. Circle, Mysore zoo, etc. .

Plantations

In addition to Mysore, the railroad model also depicts the coffee plantations of Kodagu. The region was included in the model because the engineering-cum-traffic survey for a new broad gauge railway line from Mysore to Madikere via Kushalnagar was inaugurated in December 2011. The entire layout, spread over 200 sq. ft, is lit with nearly 500 bulbs and the Mysore railway station is the first in the country to create a railroad model, which has been depicted in the heritage gallery on Platform No. 1.

The concept was mooted by senior divisional commercial manager Anup Dayanand Sadhu while a city-based hobbyist Ramji Swaminathan, an expert in model-making, chipped in with his ideas and collections, spending nearly Rs. 8 lakh in pursuit of this concept.

The railroad model was inaugurated by A.H. Vishwanath, MP, and Mr. Sadhu.

source:http://www.thehindu.com/news/states/...cle2904192.ece
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:40 PM   #5619
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Model Railroad Layout: New addition to tourist attractions

People can buy a platform ticket and view the miniature models
The city railway station here is now home to a ‘Model Railroad Layout’, which is the first of its kind in the country.


MP Adagur H Vishwanath threw the doors of the model railroad layout, which was created by the Mysore Division of the South Western Railway, open to the public here on Friday.

The scale models include six miniature trains - two of which are hauled by vintage steam locomotives - running through tunnels and up the hill with six coaches in each train.

It also has models of Chamundi Hill, K R Circle, KRS Dam, Clock Tower, Philomena’s church and Zoo. The 200 square feet model is housed at the existing Heritage Gallery on Platform One at the Mysore Railway Station.

The layout is lit with 500 LED bulbs and will be in operation with day and night effect.

Beacon of hope

For people of the region, who have been hoping that the Mysore-Bangalore double track and a railway line to Kodagu will come true, the ‘Model Railroad Layout’ could be a beacon of hope. The model has a double track between Mysore and Bangalore and includes the Srirangapatna station. The Madikeri station and railway line passing Kushalanagar has also taken shape on the model.

Speaking on the occasion, senior commercial manager, Mysore division, South Western Railway, Dr Anup Dayanand Sadhu said that the concept was initialised about two years back. Sadhu said that he had come across a similar model at the Science and Technology Museum at Chicago, USA, which had about 160 miniature trains.

Similary, Hamburg in Germany has one of the biggest railroad model layouts, he added. Divisional railway manager, Vinod Kumar, said the Mysore division was aiming to provide better facilities to passengers. He said the division was aiming to bag the most tourist friendly station award this year.

MP Vishwanath urged the railway authorities to convene a meeting with passengers and elected representatives to understand the problems faced by the people.He said, that it would them serve the passengers better.

Promise!

MP Adagur H Vishwanath said that work on the Mysore-Bangalore double track is expected to be completed by the end of 2013. He said a team has already visited to inspect the Tippu’s Armoury at Srirangapatna. Priority is to shift the armoury and complete the work at the earliest, he added.

source:http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...n-tourist.html
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:43 PM   #5620
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A smoother, shorter drive between Bangalore, Hassan



Work on NH 48 between Nelamangala, Devihalli almost over


The journey between Bangalore and Hassan, which used to take almost five hours a year ago, has just become smoother and shorter.

Now, the 185-km distance between the two cities on National Highway 48 can be covered in less than three hours after the road was upgraded to a four-lane highway.

The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) has completed four-laning the 81.8-km stretch between Nelamangala and Devihalli (near Bellur Cross), even as the upgrading of the stretch of this highway between Devihalli and Hassan (77 km) is progressing quickly.

The two-lane national highway, a vital link between the State capital and districts in the Malnad and coastal belt, had become saturated with the volume of traffic increasing over the years, forcing the Union Ministry of Road Transport and Highways to widen the road.

Several dangerous curves that led to fatal accidents near Solur, Kunigal, Yediyur and Channarayapatna have been straightened to improve safety.

Driving at during the night on the two-lane NH 48 had become dangerous in the recent past, recalled S.N. Mahesh, a taxi driver from Bangalore, who regularly makes trips to Kukke Subramanya, Dharmasthala and Sringeri.

Sharp curves and large bulky avenue trees made driving a tough task, he said.

COMPLETE MAKEOVER

However, the highway has now undergone a complete makeover. Those travelling on the stretch after a long time may not be able to recognise any of the old landmarks.

One noticeable change from the earlier two-lane highway is the Kunigal bypass, which avoids the congested Kunigal town. Overpasses have been built en route towns and junctions, including Yediyur town and Turuvekere Cross.

WORK ALMOST COMPLETE

R.K. Gupta, NHAI Project Director, Bangalore, told The Hindu that the four-laning work on this stretch executed by LANCO Devihalli Highways Pvt. Ltd. on build, own, transfer (BOT) basis for Rs. 441 crore was almost complete.

Meanwhile, the four-laning of the highway between Devihalli and Hassan, being executed on BOT basis by Larsen & Toubro for Rs. 453 crore is progressing fast and is expected to be completed by June 2013, Mr. Gupta said.

Apart from widening the existing road, the project also involves construction of a greenfield two-lane paved bypass for Channarayapatna town, and the widening and paving of a two-lane bypass construction for Hassan town.

source:http://www.thehindu.com/news/states/...cle2900905.ece
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