daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation > Airports

Airports discussions about existing airports



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 30th, 2011, 07:00 AM   #41
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Mon, Aug 29, 2011
Airport body doesn’t like ‘unesthetic’ animal figures
Taipei Times Staff Writer, with CNA

Taoyuan International Airport Corp (TIAC) has urged the nation’s aviation regulator to help it move colorful public art installations from the arrival lobby of one of the airport’s terminals because their esthetics do not fit in.

TIAC chairman Yeh Kuang-shih (葉匡時) said on Saturday that the colorful animal figures in the arrival lobby of Terminal 2 did not match the overall esthetics and feeling of the facility and he felt they should be moved.

He added that passenger convenience was the airport’s top priority and contended that the figures were blocking the movement of people using the arrival hall.

Yeh’s biggest complaint, however, seemed to be that his company, which is responsible for managing Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, had no control over the positioning or design of the artworks because of legal restrictions.

Based on the Public Art Establishment Measures (公共藝術設置辦法) implemented in 1998, 1 percent of the construction costs of all public facilities must be allocated to public art to create more esthetically pleasing venues.

Following 10 years of deliberation after the completion of Terminal 2 in 2000, the animal figures began to be moved into Terminal 2 last year to meet the public art requirement, and the colorful statues can now be found at eight locations around the facility.

However, according to the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA), the regulation also stipulates that the public artworks must be kept in place for at least five years after they were installed.

The CAA said that if the airport wanted to move the artworks, it could not directly intervene but could only convene a panel of experts to determine if the request was valid.

The regulatory body, which said it had not received any complaints about the look of the figures, expected such a procedure to be cumbersome and time-consuming and might not achieve the result Yeh desires.

However, the TIAC executive was still determined to change the look of Terminal 2.

“TIAC is responsible for the success or failure of the airport’s operations and should have the authority to position the public artworks rather than have the decision made by a group that has nothing to do with the airport’s operations,” Yeh said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 12th, 2011, 06:34 PM   #42
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Mon, Sep 12, 2011
Taipei Times
Pigeons pose serious aviation risk

Flight safety at Taipei International Airport (Songshan) is under scrutiny following the release of a survey that showed that 10 locations near the airport were frequented by wild pigeons, increasing the chances of birds striking planes and causing accidents.

The survey, conducted by the Flight Safety Foundation-Taiwan, tracked the movement of the pigeons using radio waves from January until the middle of May. It identified 10 locations in which flocks of wild pigeons are constantly observed.

The foundation said most of those locations were less than 1km from the airport’s runways.

The closest was at Chengmei Riverside Park (成美河濱公園), which is only 300m away from the runways, followed by Yingfeng Riverside Park (迎風河濱公園), which is 390m from the runways. The former averaged 149 birds, while the latter attracted an average of 98 birds.

The farthest location was Minsheng Park (民生公園), about 1.27km from the runways, the report showed.

The foundation said pigeons gathering at Chengmei Riverside Park and Xinsheng Park (新生公園) were potential threats to landing aircraft because they were close to the end of the runway.

Pigeons at the Yingfeng Riverside Park could affect aircraft during takeoff, the foundation said.

The foundation established that the pigeons were gathering at those locations because people were feeding them.

The report said the pigeons would congregate in flocks around certain feeders at certain hours, adding that the flocks were bigger when there are more feeders around.

The foundation said most people did not associate feeding pigeons with flight safety.

While there are signs in the park banning pigeon feeding, the foundation said that they did little to help control the number of wild pigeons because they did not explain to the public why such behavior was prohibited.

The government cannot fine pigeon feeders because there is no penalty for the behavior.

The foundation said the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) should amend the Civil Aviation Act (民用航空法) by stipulating fines for pigeon feeders.

Currently, the CAA has banned those living within 5km of the runway from raising pigeons. Those raising pigeons in the restricted area could be fined between NT$300,000 (US$10,332) and NT$1.5 million and pigeon lofts would be torn down.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2011, 06:07 PM   #43
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

First Asian hornet stinging reported at Taoyuan airport
Staff Writer, with CNA
Fri, Sep 09, 2011

A female passenger at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, was stung late last month by an Asian hornet, or a “tiger head bee,” in what was reported to be the first such incident at the country’s main airport.

The hornet injects a potent venom that can damage tissue and even be lethal in some cases.

The woman said she was standing at an airline counter in Terminal 2 on Aug. 30 when she felt an insect flying near her head, local media reported.

She tried to swat it, but then felt an acute pain on her inner wrist, she said.

A wasp, nearly 5cm long fell to the ground and she immediately stamped on it, the woman said.

“The pain was unbearable even after emergency treatment at the medical center and taking medicine,” said the woman surnamed Lee (李), who was leading a tour group to Thailand.

Lee said she could not abandon her group, so she boarded the plane for Thailand as scheduled.

By the time she returned to Taiwan on Sunday, the sting had festered and she later developed cellulitis, a skin infection characterized by swelling, warmth, redness and pain.

This is the first reported case of a passenger being stung by a hornet at the airport since it opened in 1979.

The airport agreed to pay Lee’s medical bills and presented her with a gift.

Management also mobilized more than 30 people at the airport to search for hornet’s nests and other pests, but nothing was found.

An official said that although it was probably an isolated incident, the airport would step up pest control efforts.

Sung I-hsin (宋一鑫), an entomologist with the Council of Agriculture, said that tiger head bees usually build their nests in earth mounds, but can fly more than 10km.

Most likely, the bee that stung Lee inadvertently flew into the airport terminal, he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2011, 08:51 AM   #44
tchen
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 297
Likes (Received): 29

Copied over from williamchung7's post in the Taiwan Infrastructures forum:

Terminal 1 Remodeling Progress: (Photos from the Liberty Times)

tchen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 11th, 2011, 09:10 AM   #45
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

FEATURE: Air traffic controllers tell of stress and joy
IN THE KNOW: While the job of an air traffic controller is very stressful, it is also rewarding and comes with some perks, such as knowing what flights celebrities are on
By Shelley Shan / Staff Reporter
Tue, Oct 11, 2011
Taipei Times

Many people who watched the US movie Pushing Tin walked away with a new-found respect for the work that air traffic controllers do on a daily basis, particularly how they manage to route planes and prevent traffic jams or worse.

However, to actual controllers who work at the North Air Traffic Service Park, the movie only partially portrayed what they deal with on a daily basis.

The North and South Air Traffic Service Parks, run by the Air Navigation and Weather Services, are in charge of regulating air traffic in the Taipei Flight Information Region (FIR), which is bordered by Fukuoka FIR in Japan, Manila FIR in the Philippines, Hong Kong FIR and Shanghai FIR in China.

The Taipei FIR sees 1.2 million aircraft pass through its jurisdiction a year.

“The job of an air traffic controller is to accurately guide aircraft and to make sure they are safely spaced apart in terms of distance and altitude,” senior air traffic controller Genny Teng (鄧惠娟) said. “We have to make sure aircraft that have already taken off can smoothly enter the airspace and that those arriving at an airport can safely land on the runways.”

Aside from handling the pressure of routine work, Teng said air traffic controllers also need to react quickly in emergency situations.

“When Japan was struck by a powerful earthquake and the ensuing tsunami in March, we had to keep flights to Japan from taking off from Taiwan and tried to inform those that were already in the air to stop heading there,” Teng said.

Forty-year-old Mao Hsiu-ju (毛修如) decided to become an air traffic controller because she wanted to follow in the footsteps of her father, who was an flight controller for the air force.

The crash of a TransAsia Airways aircraft in 1995 was the worst experience in her career.

“I was 22. The crash happened only a year after I got my license as an air traffic controller,” Mao said. “I was working at the control tower at [Taipei’s] Songshan Airport [now Taipei International Airport] and the plane was returning from -Penghu to Taipei on Lunar Year’s Eve. I remember communicating with the pilot before the accident and I even told him they were clear for landing, but there was bad weather and I eventually lost contact with him.”

Mao said she had a feeling that something bad must have happened because the communication never resumed.

The plane was found the next day near Yingge (鶯歌) in then--Taipei County.

“It was so sad that I really don’t want to remember any of it,” she said.

Mao said Pushing Tin might have exaggerated the life of an air traffic controller a little, but she added that they are indeed under tremendous pressure whenever there is heavy air traffic.

She said they generally allow seven or eight aircraft to be in the same zone at a time.

When on duty, each controller must sit at a control seat for an hour and take a 30-minute break before resuming work. They must also take turns working the day shift and the night shift.

Prior to working in their new, spacious and well-lit office in Taoyuan, both Teng and Mao had to work in a dark air traffic control room because they had to be able to see the aircraft on the radar screen.

Jean Shen (沈啟), director of the Air Navigation and Weather Services, said she was a controller when the US was still engaged in the war in Vietnam. She said they had to work with people from the US Air Force to regulate flights from Vietnam.

“Back then, they were using still high-frequency radio to communicate with the pilots,” she said. “The reception was not good and you could hear the loud noises made by the aircraft.”

Despite the long hours and the stress, Teng and Mao say the life of an air traffic controller is not all work and no play.

“We are the first people to know exactly when and on which flights any celebrities are,” Teng said, adding that she had guided planes that had former NBA star Michael Jordan as well as “the King of Pop” Michael Jackson on board.

“We called Jordan’s plane ‘Nike One,’” she said.

Mao said her sister was also drawn to the work as an air traffic controller and eventually became one.

One of their colleagues has four siblings and all of them are air traffic controllers, she said.

“The work is stressful, no doubt, but you gain the sense of achievement after you safely guide the planes to land or to pass over Taiwan,” Mao said.

Published on Taipei Times :
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../11/2003515467
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 31st, 2011, 07:04 PM   #46
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Source : http://pic.feeyo.com/posts/547/5478548.html





__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 31st, 2011, 11:46 PM   #47
Awesome.e
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 1,866
Likes (Received): 33

Hello Kitty?? seriously? LOL!
Awesome.e no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2011, 12:23 AM   #48
Halawala
Fairouzy
 
Halawala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Doha
Posts: 7,868
Likes (Received): 265

Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesome.e View Post
Hello Kitty?? seriously? LOL!
Hello Kitty is like only the most famous livery in Taiwan! And in Japan they have Pokemon. Remember him? The yellow creature, Spongebob's ancestor.
__________________
@Halawala
#R4BIA #thankyouHAMAD
Halawala no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2011, 05:56 PM   #49
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Source : http://pic.feeyo.com/posts/548/5481181.html



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2011, 03:34 PM   #50
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Source : http://pic.feeyo.com/posts/548/5481558.html



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2011, 07:09 PM   #51
Jim856796
Registered User
 
Jim856796's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Citizen of the World
Posts: 8,954
Likes (Received): 847

Terminal 1 of Taipei Taoyuan Airport is currently undergoing a US$57,400,000 renovation project. It includes a new facelift (designed by Norihiko Dan) and a new modern and stylish interior. It also includes construction of dividing walls on the east and west sides of the terminal, renovation of the arrival and departure halls, and construction of new parking garages. It will double its floor area, expand the number of check-in counters, and have enlarged shopping areas. It is expected to increase Terminal 1's capacity from 12 million to 15 million passengers per year when completed. The renovation will take place during late hours to avoid congestion during peak hours.

There is also a suggestion that a third runway be built for the airport, though building a new runway would be very expensive as it would involve a huge compensation for acquiring land. Will the airport be fine with two runways indefinitely or should there be two more runways?
__________________
I honestly think all development projects must be sustainable and futureproof.

You support the good projects... and oppose the bad.
Jim856796 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2011, 05:15 AM   #52
big-dog
Registered User
 
big-dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,080
Likes (Received): 6840

taken by me early last month

big-dog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2011, 09:51 AM   #53
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Wed, Nov 09, 2011
Taipei airport’s new observation deck opens
Taipei Times

Those interested in watching aircraft take off can now do so free of charge from the observation deck at Taipei International Airport (Songshan airport), which will be opened to the public today.

The observation deck was part of the Civil Aeronautics Administration’s plan to renovate the airport after international flights resumed at the facility three years ago.

According to the administration, the observation deck has an area of about 1,801m2. It is about 100m away from the runway and can accommodate 500 to 600 people at a time.

The administration said visitors could sit on chairs designed by -Brisbane-based Alexander Lotersztain and drink coffee while watching the aircraft arrive and depart, adding that they could see the Grand Hotel, Miramar Entertainment Park and Taipei 101 from the observation deck as well.

Previously, aviation enthusiasts would view aircraft from Alley 180 on Binjiang Street in Taipei, which is near the end of the airport’s runway.

Minister of Transportation and Communications Mao Chi-kuo (毛治國) said at the inauguration ceremony yesterday that he hoped the observation deck would become a new meeting place in Taipei.

Mao said the deck was a perfect place for couples to spend a romantic evening together and the Taipei Aviation Office might open a forum on its Web site allowing couples to post their love stories.

Mao said the completion of the observation only put a “comma” on the airport’s renovation, which is scheduled for completion by the end of this year.

“[Former Taipei EasyCard Corp chairman] Sean Lin (連勝文) said Songshan airport was inferior to Pyongyang airport,” he said. “I’ve never been to North Korea, but I knew it was not a nice comment. I could only accept it at that time and tried to address it quickly.”

That said, Mao added that Taipei airport now has the potential to be one of the world’s best airports.

The observation deck was scheduled to open in July, but the administration postponed the opening until this month because it was waiting for specially designed chairs to arrive from Spain.

Starting today, the deck will be open to the public daily from 9am to 9pm.

Visitors can enter the observation deck through Terminal 2.

Visitors may not fly kites, operate remote-controlled planes or engage in any activity that might compromise aviation safety. Violators could be fined between NT$30,000 and NT$1.5 million (US$997 and US$49,841), the administration said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2011, 10:07 AM   #54
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Tue, Nov 22, 2011
Taipei Times
Runway work to be completed by Jan. 8, TAIC says

Officials at Taoyuan International Airport Corp (TIAC) said yesterday that preparatory work on the 05/23 runway renovation project should be completed by Jan. 8.

Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport has two runways — 05/23 and 06/24.

The company originally planned for work on the 05/23 runway to take place from Sept. 15 to Dec. 13. However, the contractor backed out of the project in the middle of last month as a result of financial problems, causing the project to be delayed for nearly one month.

The company reopened bidding for the contract last week and is still requiring the winning contractor to finish renovation work by Jan. 8, when passenger numbers will spike as people return home for the Lunar New Year holidays

However, that requirement reduced interest in the project because many considered the risks for being in default on the terms of the contract to be too high.

RSEA Engineering Corp (榮工工程) won the contract on Sunday by placing a bid of NT$180 million (US$5.94 million), which was closest to the minimum bid of NT$190 million, the company said.

To meet the deadline of Jan. 8, the company said that RSEA would have to work around the clock, adding that the company started work yesterday.

In view of the issues with the 05/23 runway, the company has decided to review the contract for renovation work on the 06/24 runway and will announce the results of that next year.

According to TIAC, the estimated cost of the entire runway renovation project will top NT$10.7 billion, which will also include the cost for upgrading new navigation facilities.

The runway project is scheduled to be completed in 2014.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2011, 10:14 AM   #55
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Wed, Nov 23, 2011
FEATURE: Aviation fans on lookout for spots for photography
EXCITING SKIES : Enthusiasts are always looking to snap photos of interesting things in the skies and get ‘hooked’ on the smell of burned rubber from tires hitting the runway
By Lin Chia-chi / Taipei Times Staff Reporter

Following the launch of the observation deck at Taipei International Airport (Songshan airport) on Nov. 8, aviation enthusiasts have started sharing several locations they see as great spots for runway stakeouts and da tie niao, or the art of taking pictures of airplanes.

Taiwan has seen a boom in traffic over its airspace, but because of security concerns at its airports, most facilities are walled off and terminals are rarely designed to facilitate interaction between humans and aircraft.

Those reasons, as well as the direction of runways and constantly changing weather, are why it is hard to get good photographs of airplanes, or at least one with a blue sky behind it.

However, Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) tower control staffer Lee Hung-ming (李宏鳴) said this also contributed to photographs that are characteristic of Taiwanese aeronautics, often giving aviation photography in Taiwan an interesting mix of elements.

Lee said those “difficulties” have prompted aviation fans to “find other ways” to get to spots suitable for observing aircraft.

Jim Hung (洪景川), an aviation enthusiast with 37 years experience, who works at the Taipei Astronomical Museum, has never allowed anything interesting happening in the skies elude his attention.

Hung said there are at least 100 serious aviation fans who get a kick from seeing planes take off, the roar of plane engines or the smell of burned rubber from the contact of aircraft tires with the tarmac.

“It gets us hooked like morphine,” Hung said.

Only fully civilian airports in Taiwan allow legal photography of planes, Hung said, citing Kaohsiung International Airport, Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, Taitung Airport and airports in Penghu County’s Wangan (望安) and Cimei (七美) townships, Green Island (綠島) and Orchid Island (蘭嶼) as examples.

Taking photos of planes is acceptable as long as the photographer does not pose any danger to the aircraft, Hung said, adding that the recent hype with Taipei airport’s observation deck was because of its dual usage, with both civilian and military aircraft using its runways, making it a more sensitive location.

If one really wants to take pictures, Hung suggested taking pictures of civilian planes and not military ones.

Although the observation deck offers a comfortable view of the aircraft, Hung said Lane 180, Binjiang Road, in Taipei, which is right at the end of Taipei International’s airstrip, was the best spot for those wanting to take pictures of aircraft landing or taking off.

“It’s a popular spot that draws a great crowd in the evening and at nightfall, as you can actually see the planes go right over your head,” Hung said.

Kaohsiung International Airport is also a favorite, he said, because it is one of the few spots where you can openly observe planes at a close distance.

“You can even smell the burned rubber from the wheels,” Hung said.

However, Hung also reminded those wishing to observe planes to keep safety in mind, citing his own experience of being injured by the barb-wired fences outside an airport. He also said people needed to be careful not to disrupt aeronautic safety by damaging the environment.

Only then can these sites that are particular to Taiwan be preserved, Hung said.

Translated by Jake Chung, staff writer
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2011, 11:28 AM   #56
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Thu, Nov 24, 2011
Taoyuan airport has improved in efficiency: official
Taipei Times

Deputy Minister of Transportation and Communications Yeh Kuang-shih (葉匡時) yesterday said that Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport had greatly improved in efficiency since it became a state-run company last year, adding that it was unfair to describe the airport as an “international joke.”

“The airport does have room for improvement and we have not done enough,” Yeh said. “However, if the airport got a score of 50 out of 100 before it became a company, I would say that the score has now improved to 70.”

Yeh made the comment at the legislature’s Transportation Committee, which was reviewing the budget plan for Taoyuan International Airport Corp (TIAC) for the next fiscal year.

Yeh is currently the chairman of TIAC.

Lawmakers serving on the committee pointed out a series of problems reported at the nation’s largest airport.

Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) Legislator Luo Shu-lei (羅淑蕾) said the purpose of establishing the company was to ensure that the airport was professionally managed like a private firm.

However, 14 separate incidents had occurred at the airport in the year since the company was established, she said.

“International passengers now know what a lousy airport we have,” Luo said. “It has become a joke. When will we hear the end of it?”

Yeh disagreed with Luo’s characterization of the nation’s main gateway as “a joke.”

“People think that Hong Kong International Airport is one of the best airports in the world, but if it also had dozens of journalists who reported on everything that happened there as we do, I am sure they would discover lots of problems as well,” he said.

Democratic Progressive Party Legislator Yeh Yi-jin (葉宜津) said she did not know how the company had the nerve to talk of making the airport the hub of the Asia-Pacific region.

She asked that TIAC continue to present regular reports on work at the airport.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2011, 08:17 AM   #57
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Sat, Nov 12, 2011
Direct flights between Taipei and Seoul negotiated
Taipei Times

Direct flight service between Taipei International Airport (Songshan airport) and Gimpo airport in Seoul, South Korea, has finally become a reality after Taiwan signed an aviation pact with South Korea yesterday.

The service was part of President Ma Ying-jeou’s (馬英九) campaign promises of building a “Golden Aviation Circle in Northeast Asia” to connect Taipei, Shanghai, Tokyo and Seoul.

Sources within the Civil Aeronautics Administration had indicated that South Korea had been unwilling to negotiate direct flight service because it was requesting that Taiwan give South Korean flights the right to fly to a third country after they arrive in this nation, also known as the “fifth freedom of the air.” Both sides had been unable to reach consensus on the issue.

Civil Aeronautics Administration Director-General Yin Chen-pong (尹承蓬) said that the negotiations were this time limited to passenger flight services between the two airports. The parties did not talk about the possibility of granting the fifth freedom of the air, he said.

According to a statement issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the direct flight service between the two airports will begin in March next year, when the International Air Transport Association starts to implement its summer scheduling.

Each side is allowed to dispatch seven flights a week, and the governments on both sides can assign specific carriers to offer the direct flight service, using aircraft that can carry 200 passengers or less.

The capacity for the flight service between the Taoyuan and Incheon airports, on the other hand, has been increased from 4,500 seats to 5,500 seats a week.

Like Songshan, Gimpo is located in its country’s capital. According to the administration, passengers arriving at Incheon airport spend about 80 to 90 minutes on the road before they reach downtown Seoul. Travel time will be reduced by about 20 minutes if they arrive at Gimpo airport.

Statistics from the Ministry of Transportation and Communications showed that South Korean visitors to Taiwan had increased from about 167,600 in 2009 to about 216,900 last year. Taiwanese visitors to South Korea had also risen from about 380,500 in 2009 to 406,300 last year.

Currently, Taiwan has 50 weekly flights to South Korea, offered by China Airlines (中華航空), EVA Airways (長榮航空), Korean Air, Asiana Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways and Thai Airways.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2011, 08:41 AM   #58
krnboy1009
Registered User
 
krnboy1009's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 1,661
Likes (Received): 169

Werent they gonna demolish Songshan?
krnboy1009 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2011, 09:08 AM   #59
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Quote:
Originally Posted by krnboy1009 View Post
Werent they gonna demolish Songshan?
I think now they plan to expand it even more with increased international flights. There's also a new MRT station at Songshan as well.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2011, 10:14 AM   #60
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,849
Likes (Received): 18133

Airport security to be stepped up
IMPROVED::A new airport security system is to help prevent boarding passes being issued to suspicious people and assist participation in visa-waiver programs
Taipei Times Staff Writer, with CNA
Thu, Dec 01, 2011

The government plans to launch a new airport security system next year to step up border security as it is tries to join the US’ visa-waiver program.

The new airport security system, combined with other recent security changes, will help with criminal investigations, as well as make it a more -appealing -candidate for visa-free access to countries such as the US, National Immigration Agency Director-General Hsieh Li-kung said.

An advanced passenger processing system, scheduled to begin testing next year, will allow airlines to access real-time information about passengers to prevent boarding passes being issued to suspicious passengers. The agency will cooperate with domestic airlines over the use of the system before it extends its cooperation to foreign airlines, Hsieh said.

Taiwan is one of the first countries in the Asia-Pacific region to adopt the system, he said, adding that Australia and South Korea have done so already.

In August, the agency began operation of an advanced passenger information system that allows immigration officers to receive passenger information from airlines after check-in procedures are completed so that suspicious travelers can be tracked.

Hsieh said a lot of positive feedback has been received about efforts to tighten border security.

Premier Wu Den-yih recently said Taiwan is expected to be included in the US’ visa-waiver program candidate list by the end of the year.

Over the past three years, the number of countries or regions that have accepted Taiwan into their visa-waiver programs has risen from 54 to 124.

Published on Taipei Times :
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../01/2003519664
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
east asian hub airport, taipei

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium