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Old October 29th, 2009, 09:58 PM   #21
JP
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WIEN - VIENNA














Wohnhaus - Leopold Fuchs - 1912
Landstraße Hauptstraße 23-25 (W1030)










Wohnhaus - Prutscher - 1913
Lerchenfelderstraße 35 (W1070)




Wohnhaus - Berger - 1906
Dannebergplatz 11 (W1030)





Geschäfthaus- Fabiani - 1899
Ungargasse 59-61 (W1030)





Jugenstil Misch Masch





































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Old November 1st, 2009, 09:54 PM   #22
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so many fantastic buildings! Jugendstil is THE architecture!

Riga is also called as "Art Nouveau metropolis", we have more than 800 buildings of the style in the centre alone. Here some examples of Riga, which looks and feels quite different from Western Europe Jugendstil:





Alberta street 4 is one of the most famous Riga's Art Nouveau symbols, built in 1904. It's one of 6 Eisenstein's works in Alberta street and few years ago was completely reconstructed - there are 8 luxurious flats now. Building's facade is ornated by many Art Nouveau elements - mythological animals, faces, flora themes, etc. What I found the most amazing about this building is it's window style in 2nd, 3rd and 4th floor, central part of the building. To my mind, exactly this combination creates the main character of the building.









Alberta street 2 - neighbour building, another Eisenstein's project. Built in 1906. This one is different in it's style - more massive looking, without animals and faces.







Alberta street 2a. Built in the same year - 1906. Guess 3 times which is the architect... This building suprises with it's excessive floor, through it's "windows" you can see skies. Very nice effect! The facade richly ornamented again, motives from ancient Egypt there as well.



Buildings hall and staircase was renovated back in 1990, but outside cries for reconstruction - although this, decayed state has it's own charm.



Alberta street 8. One of the first Eisenstein's projected buildings on Alberta street - built in 1903. Another one of my favourites.





You can spend an hour to properly explore just one building. You can gradually discover it - all it's elements separately and then the whole symmetrical combination which they makes all together.




facade details on Alberta street 6.
Don't have a picture of whole building - it's hidden behind trees. These faces over the entrance symbolizes man's thread of life - although it's rather impossible to decode such message when looking at them

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Old November 1st, 2009, 10:05 PM   #23
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...Alberta street 13 - another one building by Mr. Eizensteins, one of his most experimental buildings, where the architect/engineer in decorative Art Nouveau style experimented not only with various architectural influences, but also with construction materials and elements.



It's built in 1904 and now houses Belgium embassy as well as Riga Graduate School of Law.



Round corner of the building. Those screaming womens on the left and the right side are probably in shock about the current economic situation in Latvia



All these sculptures and ornaments would be enough for a small palace:





We are slowly going towards the next building...



...which is Strēlnieku street 4a. Of course, Eisenstein again - even more heavily decorated building. Built in 1905 as a private school. In Soviet times - believe it or not - there was a dormitory dorms in this luxury building. Now it is school (university) again - the prestigious Stockholm School of Economics in Riga is located there.









In front of this building, the monument to Riga mayor (1901-1912) George Armitstedt is located. His time was probably the most succesful time in the history of Riga - from the beginning of 20th Century until 1st World War the city virtually exploded in it's development.



Now we can step back to the Alberta street crossing point and take a look at different style building - Alberta street 12. This is the work of Konstantīns Pēkšēns (it was his personal house) & Eižens Laube, built in 1903.



This building is considered to be the National Romanticism version of Art Nouveau, it includes also Renaissance and Medieval architectural elements.





One of the most notorious Latvian writers - Rūdolfs Blaumanis, and one of the most notorious painters - Jānis Rozentāls lived in this building as well.







View of all these 3 buildings from Strēlnieku street looks just great:

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Old November 8th, 2009, 03:50 PM   #24
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Very nice, both Vienna and Riga


I'm going to focus on a couple of Belgian architects here. First the most famous and influential of our "big three": Victor Horta. He's pretty much single handedly responsible for the popularity of the curved "whiplash" lines that are typical for the Belgian and french art nouveau architecture. This really almost came out of nowhere. He had designed a neo-renaissance house in his hometown Ghent in the 1880's but he spend most of his early carreer as the assistant of Alphonse Balat who build in a bombastic Beaux-Arts style. If there was any direct influence by Balat on Horta it's probably through the greenhouses of the royal palace. Balat was a very conservative architect but here he created some of the finest 19th century architecture in Belgium using iron.



Around 1890 he started his own carreer again with a small number of proto-art nouveau buildings of which the temple of the human passions is the most famous. At first sight, the building looks like a classic temple but if you look more closely at it you can notice there is not a single straight line in the building. There's always a little, sometimes almost unnoticeable curve and the shape of the capitals and pediment where something new at the time.



In 1893 he finally had developed his own style and because had been extensively networking in the previous years had gained a rich and progressive clientele who where willing to have houses in an avant garde style.

First he build the hotel Tassel and the maison Autrique.



The maison Autrique was the first art nouveau facade but the real shock came with the Tassel house.



The use of steel in the facade of a house was not done at the time as it was considered to be unnatural and was associated with industry. Another big difference with Autrique house was the floorplan. The first still had a conventional interior but with the second he broke with this traditional scheme. In fact he built a house consisting of three different parts. Two stone buildings at both ends of house that where linked by a glass and steel structure which brought light throughout the entire house and created a central staircase, something unseen at the time.



His fame grew quickly with the houses and soon he had the change to build the new houses for the rich and famous of Belle epoque Brussels like the minister of the colonies Van Eetvelde





and the rich industrial Solvay



These contacts also enabled him to get the contract to build a school in the centre of Brussel



With all these projects he quickly gathered the funds to build his own house and studio with the same details and materials during this period.



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Old November 8th, 2009, 03:51 PM   #25
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Two of the most important buildings of this early period unfortunatly dissapeared in the 1960's.

The maison du peuple was torn down to build one of Brussels more uglier towers despite protest.





His most known department store, the innovation, with a facade fully in steel and glass unfortunately ended more dramatically. It burned down in '67 killing 323 people, one of Belgium's greatest disasters.




After 1900 his style slowely started to revert back to his more classical roots. While stil modern the use of visable metal was cut back and his typical whiplash style was fading.

Important examples are the Waucquez department store, now the Belgian Centre for Comic Strip Art.





And the Wolfers Jewellers Shop



Another examples of his transition from his early to his late art nouveau work is this villa in Ronse.



Eventually little reminded of his more extravagant early buildings as this house in Antwerp from 1910 shows.



After the first world war this trend continued and he turned to his own style of art deco. He spend most of his time teaching and overseeing other projects but in between he created a few buildings of which the Palais dus Beaux-arts is the most important.



image hosted on flickr
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Old November 18th, 2009, 03:49 PM   #26
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Royal Greenhouses, Brussels, Belgium:
Designed by the architect Balat (Victor Horta's teacher), these greenhouses are one of Brussels' most remarkable monuments. The seven greenhouses, constructed by the architect Balat in collaboration with his pupil Victor Horta are open to the public for around 15 days a year in late April and early May. The spectacular 19th century Winter Garden, an Art Nouveau jewel classed among the greatest greenhouses of the world is worth visiting as much for its architectural merits as for the astonishing collections of tropical and subtropical plants which it houses (remarkable collections of geraniums, azaleas...).

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr






image hosted on flickr




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Old January 22nd, 2010, 05:04 PM   #27
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Theatre in Prostejov, Czech republic

Architect Jan Kotěra 1905-1907

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Old January 23rd, 2010, 03:20 PM   #28
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Buildings from Hungary

Town hall of Kecskemét (1890-96)



Palace of post (1899-1901), Budapest

The roof


The facade


Inside


The Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest (1891-96)

The facade:


The main hall

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Old January 23rd, 2010, 08:26 PM   #29
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Odon Lechner? Very nice
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Old January 24th, 2010, 12:21 AM   #30
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Lycée Grösslingová et Eglise Sainte-Elisabethe, Bratislava

Auteur Edmund Lechner, 1906-1908





Merci aux collegues de SSC qui m'ont prete ces photografies.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 03:33 PM   #31
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I really like that theater


Anyway, it took a while to get back to this because i had some work related stuff on my mind but after Horta here's Hankar.

He's not as well known and less of his architecture still remains but together they can be credited for inventing the architectural style. He developed his style independently at the same time and build his own house when Horta designed the Hotel Tassel. They both revolutionized the use of iron in architecture but Hankar's style is much more sober. This led to each of them becoming the main architects of the two defining variations of belgian art nouveau. The floral art nouveau of Horta and the geometrical of Hankar. Although Horta was the most succesful of the two Hankar's style replaced his after 1900 and eventually evolved into art deco. Hankar couldn't enjoy this succes however because unfortunately he died rather young in 1901.



This is his own house in the Defacqz street from 1893.


You can find this ensemble in the same street. The Hotel Ciamberlani on the left is regarded as his masterpiece.


It recently got the renovation it deserved.


Another Ciamberlani house, this time for the brother of the first one.


He did lean towards the Horta style when designing furniture or shopwindows as this example shows.


Another fine example of this use of curved lines was the decoration of the Congo section of the world fair of 1897 in Brussels which finally was his big break.

He had some wonderful ideas (among others a project for an artists city with housing and studios for the seaside town of Westende or an art noveau counterpart for the eifeltower) but because Horta was a better networker and his style was more popular he rarely got the opportunity to build for the upperclass or design big commercial buildings. So the rest of his remainig work consists mostly out of more modest middle class houses like these.



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Old January 24th, 2010, 04:38 PM   #32
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Van de Velde is the last of the "big three". He started a bit later than Horta and Hankar and came from a completely different direction. He started out as a painter without any education or experience in architecture who turned to design influenced by the english Arts and crafts movement. His first steps in to architecture came this way as an interior decorator and he finaly decided to he wanted to take the next step in designing his own house. He wanted everything to come together as a single work of art, not just the house but also all of the decorations, furniture and even the dresses of this wife.



The house itself is still more arts and crafts than art nouveau and at first sight it looks a lot like a traditional cottage, although the layout was revolutionary for its time. The art nouveau influences where mostly restricted to the interior and small details like the doorhandle.






This is something that was carried through in his further work. His buildings used to be rather simple and spartan on the outside while his design, furniture and interiors where among the most intricate and refined of its time. Compare for instance this monument with luscious art nouveau curves with the much more sober exterior of the Hotel De Brouckère.





Around 1900 he moved to Germany where he build soms of his most important buildings in the area around Weimar. This was certainly his most influantial period. While his style eventually evolved towards modernism he also established the school which would turn into the Bauhaus under his succesor Walter Gropius.

Some of this work abroad:

The Hague:

image hosted on flickr





Chemnitz:



Weimar:





Cologne (destroyed):

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Old January 24th, 2010, 05:24 PM   #33
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Art nouveau is just amazing, not only in Architecture but in art generally. I love it. Amazing photos Thanks
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Old January 24th, 2010, 06:18 PM   #34
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The last one from Cologne, is that a theater? When was it destroyed and are there interior pictures?
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Old January 24th, 2010, 07:46 PM   #35
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Indeed, that's the Werkbund Theatre. It was build right before the first world war and was demolished after a few months to build army barracks at it's location. Van de velde and theatres aren't a very good combination it seems.

First he designed a very nice theater for Weimar that never got build.



He also designed the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris but his proposed facade was rejected for a more conservative design by Auguste Perret.

Unfortunately i can't find any picures of its original design or from the interior of the werkbundtheater online.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 07:58 PM   #36
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I like a lot Henry Van de Velde! I´s like Wagner´s secession.
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Old January 29th, 2010, 01:04 PM   #37
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I'll just put pictures of buildings that are renovated or look good enough
Rijeka- Croatia


























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Old January 30th, 2010, 12:22 AM   #38
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Croatia -Opatija -"hotel town"















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Old January 30th, 2010, 03:32 PM   #39
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Opatija 2
Vila Munz-price 11 million euros




















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Old January 30th, 2010, 04:04 PM   #40
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These houses of Rijeka and Opatija not all Jugendstil.

Moorish revival:


Neo-renaissance:




Neo-gothic:


Neo-baroque:

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