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Old March 29th, 2014, 10:07 AM   #521
santy1401
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
image hosted on flickr


^
Yikes overcrowding

I think they need to reduce population or create additional modes of transport (i.e. underground/overground train)

The system is collapsed, but that image is the moment of greatest flow of people on the day. Also depends on the station.

Subway construction next year and tram (bogotram) starts this year.







[IMG]http://i26.************/30c63vm.jpg[/IMG]








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It has budgeted the light rail starts operation in 2015 for which 28 trains that will work with engine will have electrified. This first phase will start from the street and take the race 193 Seventh Street about 106 or 116.

Research and studies are in the second phase and has completed 80 percent. In August this year, 100 percent completed, and then continue with the project funding, which has an average investment of 500 thousand million.
Preliminary studies soon end.




There are stations with less flow of people.

image hosted on flickr


And others ...

image hosted on flickr




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Old March 29th, 2014, 02:20 PM   #522
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
image hosted on flickr


^
Yikes overcrowding

I think they need to reduce population or create additional modes of transport (i.e. underground/overground train)
I'm trying to imagine if those crowds were put into the Transjakarta narrow shelters..

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Old March 29th, 2014, 03:33 PM   #523
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Looks like the Bogota threads are in dire need of updating...


It looks like this photo, which I'm posting for the third time...
image hosted on flickr


was taken at Autopista del Norte and Calle 100. Straight ahead is Caracas, which I gather is the most congested part of the Transmileneo system. The really bad thing is that this is a point where the Transmileneo corridors diverge, with the NQS corridor branching off via those viaducts heading off to the right in the photo to serve crosstown trips. Only 1.5 km ahead, the Calle 80 corridor converges headed toward Caracas, and the Calle 80 corridor is itself fed by the Suba corridor. It's like a giant funnel. As you can see from this map, the Metro will be built some distance to the east and won't get to within easy walking distance of the Caracas corridor until Lourdes, way down at Calle 63:


So, while the Metro will provide direly needed capacity, the relief is provides to the Transmileneo will be ambient (by attracting some riders who now use the Autopista del Norte corridor) rather than direct. The Carrera 7 light rail will be even less useful in that way, and the suburban rail corridor, still less. Beyond that (so I gather), east-west connections between the three corridors are mostly by foot since they're so close together. And even if there were to be direct connections between the Metro and the Transmileneo, the volumes of foot traffic would be huge, as the photo illustrates.

Where I'm going with this is that Bogota is just screwed as far as core capacity. It hardly even matters whether the Transmileneo or the Metro was built first. But at least the Transmileneo provides an alternative for crosstown trips, which would've been prohibitively expensive to do with a metro. And future expansion of the Transmilenio (if the Metro doesn't consume all of the available funding!) will provide additional crosstown corridors along Boyaca and Carrera 68:


Plus, I'm being too pessimistic by focusing on the north side. According to this insane post, on the south side there will be direct connections between the Metro and the Transmilenio at Hospital (on Caracas), Sena (on NQS/Autosur), Portal del las Americas, and (presumably) the future Boyaca and Carrera 68 corridors.

So, what should Bogota have done? What should it do next? I dunno. But I do know that I'll be following events there with interest for the rest of my life.

EDIT: Just found this map, which shows both the Metro and the Transmilenio:

c/o deywibkiss http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=9023, where a larger version can be found
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Old March 30th, 2014, 06:46 AM   #524
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The Gold Line has a 3.7km long tunnel while the Orange Line was built along a former rail corridor and runs through low density suburban sprawl. The Orange Line should be a lot cheaper. Even if the Orange Line was built as light rail and the Gold Line was built as BRT the Gold Line would still be more expensive. The Gold Line is also around twice as busy as the Orange Line.

The Orange Line isn't proper BRT anyway as it has lots of intersections with normal traffic. Proper BRT like what is built in Bogota and Brisbane is completely separate from traffic. As far as I know Brisbane is the only first world city stupid enough to build fully grade-separated BRT and it's been an absolute disaster. The busway reached capacity within 5 years of it being built and the idiots are now considering building a 5km long busway tunnel at the cost of around 5 billion dollars. I have no problems with building bus lanes if you have room for them but spending billions of dollars on tunnels for low capacity buses is just insanity.

This German guy has a good explanation why Brisbane's Busway network is such a disaster.
http://schwandl.blogspot.com.au/2011...-brisbane.html
Nagoya has an elevated busway with guided buses. It has not been a success, there used to be three companies running buses on it, they're down to just one.

It doesn't help though that Japanese regulations make it really hard to use articulated buses (which can be justified given the narrow streets they have to navigate and the great number of pedestrians).
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Old March 30th, 2014, 04:03 PM   #525
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The Adelaide O bahn in South Australia seems like a good BRT system and pretty fast IMO.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 11:05 PM   #526
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twentyfivetacos View Post
The Gold Line has a 3.7km long tunnel while the Orange Line was built along a former rail corridor and runs through low density suburban sprawl. The Orange Line should be a lot cheaper. Even if the Orange Line was built as light rail and the Gold Line was built as BRT the Gold Line would still be more expensive. The Gold Line is also around twice as busy as the Orange Line.

The Orange Line isn't proper BRT anyway as it has lots of intersections with normal traffic. Proper BRT like what is built in Bogota and Brisbane is completely separate from traffic. ...
The initial segment of the Gold Line was opened in July 2003. The segment with the tunnel wasn't opened until November 2009. The numbers below reflect just the initial segments of the Gold Line and Orange Line. Please note that both the Gold Line and the Orange Line feature lots of intersections with normal traffic. The Orange Line does operate in its own dedicated busway for most of its length, and the transit agency is responsible for building and maintaining the busway.

Date Opened
Gold Line LRT: July 26, 2003
Orange Line BRT: October 29, 2005

Average Weekday Boardings (March 2009)
Gold Line LRT: 24,293
Orange Line BRT: 22,334

Total Annual Boardings FY2008
Gold Line LRT: 6.58 million
Orange Line BRT: 7.46 million

Route Length
Gold Line LRT: 13.7 miles
Orange Line BRT: 14 miles

Stations
Gold Line LRT: 13
Orange Line BRT: 13

Number of Railcars or Buses
Gold Line LRT: 24
Orange Line BRT: 30

System Cost
Gold Line LRT: $859 million
Orange Line BRT: $330 million

FY2009 Operations Budget
Gold Line LRT: $44 million
Orange Line BRT: $23 million
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Old March 30th, 2014, 11:18 PM   #527
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How come everywhere - in each national section - when there is a thread about BRT the tram-lovers try to tell to the entirwe world that only trams/lrt are the legitime means of transport. If you say BRt is easier and faster to build and cheaper as well than the LRT they call you liar. The same is for monorails.
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Old March 31st, 2014, 01:31 AM   #528
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How come everywhere - in each national section - when there is a thread about BRT the tram-lovers try to tell to the entirwe world that only trams/lrt are the legitime means of transport. If you say BRt is easier and faster to build and cheaper as well than the LRT they call you liar. The same is for monorails.
Because we're human.
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Old March 31st, 2014, 08:38 PM   #529
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How come everywhere - in each national section - when there is a thread about BRT the tram-lovers try to tell to the entirwe world that only trams/lrt are the legitime means of transport. If you say BRt is easier and faster to build and cheaper as well than the LRT they call you liar. The same is for monorails.
In all seriousness, BRT is most certainly a lesser form of transit than rail-based transit, in just about every metric aside from cost and flexibility.

The absurdity of the "rail is cheaper than buses" argument isn't even worth throwing a wisp of attention at, because duh. It's a distortion of the debate, much like denying that climate change is real.

I'd rather focus on the salient points of the debate. In my mind, they are:
1. Should limited public funds be spent on a more expensive, more premium rail based transit system or a more comprehensive, less premium bus based transit system? Or, does reach of the system trump the premium and the cache of rail?

2. How and when should BRT be used with regards to transit systems? Is it a starting point? A foundation? A part of an overall package/suite of transit options?

3. When we employ BRT, at what point of system usage does the investment warrant upgrading to LRT? How do we incorporate that milestone or set of milestones into the transit plant?

4. Do we abandon the BRT for rail-based transit when it's reached that milestone, or do we keep the BRT corridor and use the alignment to lay rail transit along it?

5. How do we address volatility in liquid fuel prices with regards to BRT?

6. How do we fight the "BRT creep" aspect of BRT systems, something that LRT doesn't have to deal with on exclusive corridors?

7. Possibly most importantly in the United States, are public funds more or less available for BRT systems than rail based systems? Which is to say: do the powers that be offer less money to BRT than LRT, or is it the same amount? (To put this another way, if the choice is between 10 miles of LRT and 10 miles of BRT, why not take the LRT? If the choice is between 10 miles of LRT and 30-40 miles of BRT...that's a debate to have.)

8. At what point does the expense of enhancing bus transit to a premium-like level produce diminished returns on investment? And what comparison are we using to determine that diminished return? TransMilenio is obviously comparing itself to heavy-rail/metro systems, for example, where LA's Orange Line is more on the LRT side of the equation.

9. Should all BRT corridors be designed for easy transition into LRT? Does that engineering expense increase the capital cost way past the affordability index?

10. Do people view BRT as a premium form of transit? Meaning that if it's still just a bus for poor people (not a bad investment as decent human beings, BTW) does that not encourage ridership changes?

11. Does the form of car-centric, suburban development lend itself better to BRT applications than LRT or HRT, and vice versa: does traditional grid, dense village/town/urban development lend itself better to rail transit? If so, is a hybrid system the more appropriate application?

12. If the option on the table is bus based, do we kill it because its not rail based, and thus get NO transit? I'm only throwing this out there because that's happened here, and for some, its a preferable option. Why?

That's it. I think we keep talking about the wrong items in this debate: rail is clearly better than bus based transit. That's off the table.

Nobody ever looks a the rat infested, moldy hell that is an older American subway system and wishes it were done in bus form. Now, they might wish it were cleaner and more comprehensive in reach, and they might lament at the expense of expanding it (which leads to less expansion,) but nobody thinks that bus trumps rail in mindshare, ride quality and efficiency (and if they do, they are just as distorting as those playing the "rail be cheap as buses, yo" card.)

Even at Disney World, everybody WANTS to be on a monorail line; they SETTLE for a clean, well-designed bus transit system (and they'll go slower for more cache and scenic charm via a boat.)

The question is: do the benefits with regards to cost, flexibility and comprehensive reach trump the deficits of bus-based transit systems? They may not, and that's fine, but the cost debate is absurd.

It's like comparing a Hyundai to a Bentley.

Sure, the Bentley is better. Sure, buying a Bentley will yield a better long term ROI, in that the value will fall less or not at all with regards to the price of the vehicle, versus the price of the Hyundai, which will have steep drops in resale value due to lack of cache and perceived quality and premiums. The question is: do you wait your life and your children's children's children lives to save up and buy the Bentley, or do you get behind the wheel of a Hyundai now, start enjoying the benefits of "getting around" and upgrade to the Bentley when you can afford it? Does the mobility and the affordability of the Hyundai trump the premium aspect of the Bentley? (Look on the road: clearly, many drivers have said "yes.")

Granted, a Bentley is clearly a heavy-rail system, but one could easily make the Hyundai versus Mercedes comparison here for LRT. Most people will never be able to afford a Mercedes, and even if they could, they'd rather spend their money on other things versus the premium cache of the Mercedes. So they get the Hyundai. It's not a cool as the Benz, but they put $20K in the bank in lieu of the Benz. Or they bought two Hyundais instead.
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Old March 31st, 2014, 08:47 PM   #530
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This German guy has a good explanation why Brisbane's Busway network is such a disaster.
http://schwandl.blogspot.com.au/2011...-brisbane.html
To be fair, that system looks as if the powers that be went vastly overboard in the "add in premium glam" department. It LOOKS expensive.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 01:43 AM   #531
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace1974 View Post
In all seriousness, BRT is most certainly a lesser form of transit than rail-based transit, in just about every metric aside from cost and flexibility.

The absurdity of the "rail is cheaper than buses" argument isn't even worth throwing a wisp of attention at, because duh. It's a distortion of the debate, much like denying that climate change is real.

...
Climate change! That should be sure winner for rail, but the situation is not that simple. Much of the electricity in the United States is generated via coal-burning power plants, whereas buses in many areas are powered with natural gas. The following data is from an environmental impact study for the extension of BART from Warm Springs to San Jose. I fully agree with the decision that the extension should be built to carry BART trains, but it is worth noting that the BRT option was actually predicted to produce the greatest reduction in greenhouse gases. The decision to use BART trains had to be justified based on other criteria, such as which option would take the most cars off adjacent traffic-clogged highways. The ridership numbers predicted for the BRT and LRT options were in the same ballpark, which leads me to believe that the main advantage for BART came from avoiding the need for a transfer to reach Oakland and San Francisco.

Average Weekday (Year 2025)
Busway BRT: 49,100
LRT: 56,600
BART: 87,200

New Trips (Year 2025)
Busway BRT: 35,600
LRT: 37,700
BART: 60,600

Capital Cost (2001 dollars in millions)
Busway BRT: $1,155
LRT: $1,514
BART: $3,710

Annual Operating & Maintenance Cost (2001 dollars in millions)
Busway BRT: $19.5
LRT: $41.8
BART: $63.0

Farebox Recovery
Busway BRT: 21.8%
LRT: 20.8%
BART: 64.4%

Cost per New Rider
Busway BRT: $11.40
LRT: $14.75
BART: $19.36

Daily Trips Removed from Roadways
Busway BRT: 30,791
LRT: 29,006
BART: 51,747

Daily Travel Time Savings (Hours Saved)
Busway BRT: 74,931
LRT: 71,117
BART: 153,913

Level of Noise/Vibration Impacts (Potential # Residential Impacts)
Busway BRT: 254
LRT: 707
BART: 321

Net Change in Air Pollutant Emissions (Tons)
Busway BRT: -773
LRT: -625
BART: -1,211

Net Change in Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Tons)
Busway BRT: -175,612
LRT: -121,813
BART: -151,208

Net Change in Regional Energy Consumption (BTUs)
Busway BRT: -1,297,871
LRT: -1,016,665
BART: -1,482,662
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Old April 20th, 2014, 02:35 PM   #532
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http://www.sbsun.com/general-news/20...san-bernardino

sbX rapid transit line ready to roll out this month in San Bernardino


Omnitrans trains drivers and tests new sbX buses on the new rapid transit line north and south on E Street in San Bernardino on Wednesday. The Omnitrans sbX Green Line will span a 15.7 mile corridor between San Bernardino and Loma Linda, with 16 stations. Service will start April 28. John Valenzuela — Staff

By Neil Nisperos, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin
POSTED: 04/19/14, 5:09 PM PDT

After more than a year of construction and a decade of planning, Omnitrans is about ready to roll out its $197.1-million rapid transit bus line later this month.

The near 16-mile sbX Green Line is the first bus rapid transit service in the Inland Empire.

It opens to the public on April 28, allowing bus riders to travel north and south from Cal State San Bernardino to Loma Linda University.

Officials will hold a completion celebration at 9 a.m. Tuesday at Court Street Square in San Bernardino.

Bus rapid transit, officials said, is faster and has fewer stops. The buses will also have traffic signal priority capability, allowing them to change stoplights to green for speedier travel. The system includes 5.4 miles of dedicated lanes, 16 station locations, with stops at major points of activity, such as colleges, hospitals, government centers, job centers, and retail.

“One of the reasons this particular corridor was selected and garnered support at the federal level at $75 million is because it was already a high-use corridor, and it has many key destinations along the line, which includes two universities, hospitals, the San Bernardino city and county centers, downtown San Bernardino, high schools, and several job centers,” said Omnitrans spokeswoman Wendy Williams. “It’s just a robust corridor in terms of locations that would benefit from the service.”

The rapid transit bus fleet is comprised of 14 natural-gas powered vehicles that can seat about 40, and 80 with passengers standing.

Transportation officials said their goals include reducing traffic on the region’s freeways, improving air quality, increasing bus ridership, fostering transit-oriented development in the West End of San Bernardino County, and providing better transit connections between the Omnitrans system, Metrolink, the Gold Line, and L.A./Ontario International Airport.

“We do know that having bus rapid transit stations that are permanent looking, similar to light rail, helps to spur economic development, as we’ve seen in other cities that this has been done, like Cleveland, Ohio,” said Anna Rahtz, acting planning director for Omnitrans. “Also, the idea is to provide transit options competitive with the private automobile, because it’s faster, more direct and more efficient. We’re hoping to increase transit ridership throughout the valley, and hopefully alleviate traffic congestion and air quality.”

Not everyone has been on board for the sbX line. San Bernardino Area Chamber of Commerce President Judi Penman said the project has actually hurt business in the area.

“I sincerely hope that the value of the bus ridership makes up for the hardship it has cost the businesses,” Penman said. “Those hardships have included the loss of storefront parking, and the left-hand turns that were promised to the businesses. And some businesses just gave up and left.”

Vassileios Douvikas, owner of Burger Mania restaurant on E Street, just south of Mill Street, said his business had declined by 10 percent during construction of the green line. With construction complete, Douvikas said business has returned and he’s hoping ridership could translate to customers.

“If people really are going to use that bus, yeah it’s going to help me, but I don’t see a lot of people using the bus,” Douvikas said. “I hope people use the bus. They’ve done what they’ve done. The business will make money if it works, and people start eating, I would benefit because the bus stop is in front of the restaurant.”

The Green Line is the first of a planned network of sbX corridors in the western Inland Empire.

The West Valley Connector Corridor is a proposed rapid bus line from Fontana to Pomona to serve many significant activity centers in the western portion of Omnitrans’ area, according to plans. The overall vision for the sbX system was approved by San Bernardino Associated Governments, the county’ transportation planning agency also known as SanBAG, in 2004.

Of the $191.7 million cost of the project, 96 percent comes from federal, state and county funds designated for transit projects.

Funding sources include $75 million from the FTA Small Starts Program; $45.62 million from the FTA Urbanized Area Formula Program; $21 million from the Federal Highway Flexible Funds for Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program; $14.34 million from Proposition 1B Bonds; and $5.48 million from San Bernardino County Measure I, the voter-approved half-cent sales tax, from funds dedicated to express bus and bus rapid transit.

Construction for other rapid transit corridors depends on funding. Omnitrans officials hope success with the Green Line will help to bring money for the rest of the system.


Omnitrans has begun training and testing of the new sbX bus rapid transit line north and south on E Street in San Bernardino. The Omnitrans sbX Green Line will span a 15.7 mile corridor between San Bernardino and Loma Linda, with 16 stations. Service will start April 28. John Valenzuela — Staff
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Old April 20th, 2014, 04:44 PM   #533
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More about SBX here:

http://www.estreet-sbx.com/

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Old April 20th, 2014, 04:55 PM   #534
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BRT Rio de Janeiro


https://www.flickr.com/photos/rbpdesigner/7630201478

BRT Curitiba


https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8449676754
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Old May 6th, 2014, 08:24 PM   #535
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BRT in Fort Collins, CO opens 05.10.2014

http://www.fcgov.com/max/max-construction.php

BRT in Providence, RI opens 06.21.2014

http://www.ripta.com/ripta-to-hold-c...id-bus-updates
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Old June 1st, 2016, 05:30 PM   #536
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Fresno, CA is building a BRT-lite.

Source: Fresno Bee (http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/...e80990072.html)

Quote:
MAY 31, 2016 3:53 PM

Fresno leaders to celebrate bus rapid transit construction


...

BRT will operate differently than standard transit bus service because there will be about a half mile between stops instead of a quarter mile; buses will operate with transit signal priority at intersections; and customers will buy tickets at off-board vending machines instead of dropping coins in a cash box aboard the bus.
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Old February 22nd, 2017, 02:34 AM   #537
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Article (with photographs & video) featuring the BRT under construction in the Laotian capital, Vientiane:-

Future Cities - Vientiane
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Old August 24th, 2017, 12:27 AM   #538
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Livery for upcoming Omaha Rapid Bus Transit (ORBT) in Nebraska, USA.



http://www.omaha.com/news/metro/meet...df3e8d23c.html

Livery for upcoming Tulsa BRT (Aero) in Oklahoma, USA



http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/tul...-aero#stream/0
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Old August 24th, 2017, 05:45 PM   #539
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Why do companies always like to put branding on top of windows where it blocks the view of passengers? That's trying to attract new passengers while paying less attention to the ones they have
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